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New York African Burial Ground Skeletal Biology Final Report, Volume 1. Chapter 12. Subadult Growth and Development

Author(s): , ,

Year: 2004

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Summary

Growth and developmental status is often used as an indicator of general health

status at the population level. A brief review of literature regarding human skeletal growth and development indicates there are several methodologies for assessing these processes in human skeletal remains (Albert and Greene 1999; Flecker 1942; Goode et al. 1993; Gruelich and Pyle 1950; Hoppa 1992; Hoppa and Fitzgerald 1999; Hoppa and Gruspier 1996; Johnston and Zimmer, 1989; Livshits et al. 1998; Miles and Bulman 1994; Saunders 1992; Saunders et al. 1993; Sciulli 1994; Todd 1937). Particularly, adult height may be used as a proxy for an individual’s general state of childhood and adolescent nutritional status (Goode et al. 1993; Hoppa 1992; Miles and Bulman 1994). However, Hoppa (1992) and Miles and Bulman (1994) have recently proposed the use of cross-sectional long bone growth profiles in archaeological populations as a means to assess a population’s health status, using long bone lengths would stand as a proxy for stature estimates for immature remains. On the other hand, Goode et al. (1993) propose standardizing (see below) all long bone measurements as a method of representing any or all long bones measured in a single graphic plot. This method was promoted as a means of: 1) circumventing situations wherein infant and child skeletons are either fragmentary or skeletal elements are not equally represented, 2) promoting intra- and interpopulation growth comparisons, and 3) as a means of diagnosing individuals with grossly deviant standardized values for closer analysis of the abnormality (1993:323).


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Cite this Record

New York African Burial Ground Skeletal Biology Final Report, Volume 1. Chapter 12. Subadult Growth and Development. Susan Goode-Null, K. Shujaa, Lesley M. Rankin-Hill. In New York African Burial Ground Skeletal Biology Final Report, Volume 1. Pp. 461-513. 2004 (tDAR ID: 365642) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8NS0SR2


Keywords


Temporal Coverage

Calendar Date: 1640 to 1800


Spatial Coverage

min long: -74.017; min lat: 40.694 ; max long: -73.977; max lat: 40.734 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Prepared By(s): National Park Serivce

Submitted To(s): General Services Administration Northeastern and Caribbean Region


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

New York African Burial Ground Skeletal Biology Final Report, Volume 1


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husbrabg_ch12_rvsd.pdf 287.13kb Aug 5, 2011 4:28:55 PM Public