Long Term Vulnerability and Transformation Project (LTVTP) - Documents and Data

NSF Project Resources - Margaret Nelson, Arizona State University, PI

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Documents and Data from Hegmon et al. Marking and Making Difference: Representational Diversity in the US Southwest
  • Documents and Data from Hegmon et al. Marking and Making Difference: Representational Diversity in the US Southwest
    PROJECT Uploaded by: April Kamp-Whittaker

    Data sets included in this project were created for the article "Marking and Making Difference: Representational Diversity in the US Southwest.". Published in American Antiquity 81(2), 2016, pp. 253-272. By Michelle Hegmon, Jacob Freeman, Keith W. Kintigh, Margaret C. Nelson, Sarah Oas, Matthew A. Peeples, and Andrea Torvinen The paper is based on data from the Cibola region of the US Southwest, and each (.xlsx) file includes the data for a given time period (Pueblo III, Early Pueblo IV, Late...

Documents and Data from Hegmon et al. Mimbres Pottery Designs in their Social Context
  • Documents and Data from Hegmon et al. Mimbres Pottery Designs in their Social Context
    PROJECT Uploaded by: April Kamp-Whittaker

    This is the data used in the chapter "Mimbres Pottery Designs in their Social Context" by Michelle Hegmon, James R. McGrath, F. Michael O'Hara, III, and Will G. Russell in New Perspectives on Mimbres Archaeology: Three Millennia of Human Occupation in the Desert Southwest edited by Particia A. Gilman, Roger Anyon, and Barbara Roth

General Resources from the Long Term Vulnerability and Transformation Project
  • General Resources from the Long Term Vulnerability and Transformation Project
    PROJECT Margaret Nelson. National Science Foundation.

    Long-Term Coupled Socioecological Change in the American Southwest and Northern Mexico: Each generation transforms an inherited social and environmental world and leaves it as a legacy to succeeding generations. Long-term interactions among social and ecological processes give rise to complex dynamics on multiple temporal and spatial scales – cycles of change followed by relative stasis, followed by change. Within the cycles are understandable patterns and irreducible uncertainties; neither...