Society for American Archaeology 80th Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA (2015)

Part of: Society for American Archaeology

This collection contains the abstracts from the 2015 annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Most files in this collection contain the abstract only. The Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology provides a forum for the dissemination of knowledge and discussion. The 80th Annual Meeting was held in San Francisco, California from April 15-19, 2015.


Resources Inside This Collection (Viewing 401-500 of 3,697)


  • Home on the Range: An Environmental History of Land Use Changes at Paa-ko, New Mexico (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer Rozo.

    By using multiple lines of evidence from the archaeological material record, as well as from the environmental pollen record, this paper will explore the history of anthropogenic landscape changes at one particular site in the Galisteo Basin of New Mexico. Located on the margins of the Spanish mission system, the ancestral Pueblo site of Paa-ko and its surrounding field systems present an ideal opportunity to tease out the thread of colonial influences on local communities, particularly with the...

  • The Application of X-Ray Diffraction to the Characterization of Clay Samples from the Tuxtla Mountains, México (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Isabelle Martínez-Muñiz.

    In this project I applied X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques to characterize the mineralogical composition of 11 clay samples collected from the Tuxtla Mountains, in the vicinity of Matacapan, Veracruz, México. These samples had already been analyzed through X-ray fluorescence (Pool 1990), and the data generated by XRD was compared to the already existing elemental analyses of these clays and of ceramics from the region. In this way, I attempt to distinguish minerals added to these clays in the...

  • The Performativity of Measurement (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Schon.

    This paper examines the archaeological traces of measurement in light of the roles of mensuration in quotidian rituals. Most archaeologies of performance emphasize public spectacle, coordinated by elites, usually taking place in highly visible ceremonies. While some instances of measurement do fall under this rubric, most occur with less fanfare. Nevertheless, even mundane acts of measuring may be accompanied by some amount of pageantry. Differences in context, furthermore, yield varying...

  • Fish heads that turn heads: catfish from Cabeçuda shell mound (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniela Klokler.

    Zooarchaeological analysis of the Cabeçuda shell mound identified a number of Ariidae (Genidens barbus, G. genidens) neurocrania with exceptional preservation. This site is a large mound located in southern Brazil, and the faunal collection was sampled during archaeological interventions done in the 1950s. Generally, Ariidae specimens are a common find in Brazilian shell mounds. However, Cabeçuda is the only site that presents elements with this level of preservation. Catfish neurocrania are...

  • The Benefits of Virtual Offices for a 21st Century Cultural Resource Management Consulting Firm (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Theron Isensee. Christopher Webster. Roger Werner.

    In today's day and age, we have created technology to help benefit our interaction, our communication, streamline our workload and increase our work output. The need to be in person or in house all the time as a business has changed. A company is able to save resources by allowing employees to work on their own schedule, but yet still accomplish all of the tasks, workload, and exceed deadlines by being virtual. This form of business leads to a more relaxed and happier lifestyle for those...

  • #arrowheads: Instagram as a Creative, Social Media-Based Approach to Public Archaeology (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Lynch.

    Social media is a hot topic of discussion and innovation among archaeologists. Although we've improved our ability to digitally reach wider audiences, "social media" is not a single entity. Each platform is different: purposes, user bases, and means of connection vary widely. As archaeologists, we must be proactive about fully understanding these differences, in order to find the most effective ways use each platform and reach a greater public. This paper provides an example of one way to...

  • New perspectives on Native American occupation of the Puget Lowlands of Washington during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene transition from the Bear Creek Site (45KI839). (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Kopperl. Amanda Taylor. Kenneth Ames. Christian Miss.

    The Bear Creek site (45KI839) in Redmond, Washington has yielded important information about Native American settlement, subsistence, and technology in the Puget Lowlands during the Late Pleistocene-Holocene transition. This poster presents new data on radiocarbon and optically-stimulated luminescence dating, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and lithic analysis conducted as part of the 2013 data recovery investigation. New dates contribute to an age model that places the initial archaeological...

  • Location, Location, Location: Multi-scalar Investigations into the Unexpected Timing and Length of Occupation of a Late Woodland and Early Mississippian site in the Lower Mississippi Valley (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Howard Cyr. Scott Meeks. Rocco de Gregory. Hunter Johnson.

    Site 22HO626 is a multicomponent site located along an abandoned meander loop of the Yazoo River, Holmes County, Mississippi. Due to the presence of surface collected exotic lithic materials and a close proximity to the Poverty Point center of Jaketown, 22HO626 was expected to represent a Late Archaic settlement within the lower Mississippi Valley. However, work by the University of Tennessee’s Archaeological Research Laboratory and Tennessee Valley Archaeological Research indicates a more...

  • Mapping Abydos: Bridging the Gap Between Legacy Data and Modern GPS Survey Methods in Egypt (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexander Makovics. Mark Gonzales. Dr. Matthew Adams.

    The Greater-Abydos Mapping Project began with the goal of creating a highly accurate, integrated GIS system for the entire 35km² site. This included incorporating all topographic and modern features, the translation and importation of previously utilized site coordinate systems, and all known archaeological data, including legacy data from historic excavations which started in the 1920s. Constraints in past cartographic and surveying methods, compounded by the scale of the Abydos site, over time...

  • Faux for Fact: An Experimental Ceramic Restoration Process (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica Chapman.

    This poster entails research conducted with experimental restoration processes on ceramic materials. The focus of this research is in determining a potentially ideal adhesive for use on ceramic cultural remains within the restoration process. The restoration process can be very invasive and destructive, thus to perform experiments with various chemicals on faux artifacts will ultimately help the archaeologist further understand the proper techniques that need to be carried out in order to...

  • Mortuary Archaeology of Burials from Two Swahili Stone Towns, Mtwapa and Manda, Dated to Circa 1600 CE. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lindsey Proctor. Chapurukha Kusimba. Janet Monge. Muhammad Mchula. Sloan Williams.

    Two ancient Kenyan Swahili sites were excavated over the course of five field seasons, from 2008-2012. Mtwapa (ca. 1000-1750 CE), located on the southern coast of Kenya, and Manda (ca. 800-1600 CE), located on the Northern coast, were once wealthy cosmopolitan polities involved in the Indian Ocean trade network. Both towns had populations of 5,000-10,000 at their height of occupation, and contained large central mosques. Mtwapa excavations occurred between 2008 and 2011 and produced a minimum...

  • The Alluvial Geochronology of Pharo Village and Implications for Cycles of Site Occupation and Abandonment (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrea Maniery.

    The results of geoarchaeological investigations at Pharo Village, a Fremont hamlet situated on an alluvial fan in central Utah, are reported in order to reveal how changes in alluvial dynamics contributed to the rise of Fremont farming there as well as the site’s eventual abandonment. Cutbanks along Pharo Creek, the meandering stream adjacent to Pharo Village, were mapped and sampled during fieldwork. Field and subsequent laboratory analysis allowed reconstruction of the alluvial geochronology...

  • What were they thinking? Using electroencephalogram (EEG) to map brain activations during stone tool manufacture. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Colleen Bell.

    While psychologists have been using many different methods to map brain activity during various tasks, archaeologists have yet to fully utilize the potential of these techniques to examine early human cognition. Paleolithic stone tools provide a promising line of evidence in human behavioral and cognitive evolution. Recently, brain imaging modalities such as Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) have been used to more directly link cognition and...

  • Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Archaeological Survey: Results from Portugal and Mozambique (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brandon Zinsious. Jonathan Haws.

    Any technological advance that can save archaeologists time, money and manpower should be explored thoroughly. This poster presents the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or Drones, as a supplemental tool to traditional archaeological survey. Examples from Portugal and Mozambique are included to give visual representations of the possible uses of drone technologies. We used a commercially-available Phantom 2 quadcopter with a GoPro camera for coastal survey in Praia Ray Cortico, Portugal....

  • Interpretations of the Use of Avian and Mammalian Fauna at Sapa’owingeh (LA 306) (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Laura Steele.

    Ethnographic reports of ancestral Puebloan peoples from the twentieth century suggested a food taboo for turkeys, except in rare cases. In contrast, some archaeological interpretations involving sites that predate A.D. 1300 have concluded that turkeys were an integral part of the Puebloan diet. From a modern, secular perspective, archaeologists often assume that there is a distinct separation between the use of animals for ritual and dietary purposes. This paper argues that it is impossible to...

  • The Earliest Known Occupations of the Globe Highlands in Central Arizona (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David Doyel.

    Excavations along Pinal Creek north of the Town of Miami in the Globe Highlands of central Arizona have identified a lengthy settlement history extending several thousand years from the Archaic period to the historical Apache occupation. The focus of this paper is on the earliest known periods of occupation identified by excavation. A preceramic component consisted of a structure fragment and a pit from which maize was recovered that produced a date of 790-415 B.C. E. (calibrated two-sigma),...

  • Rethinking and Refining the Activities Associated with the Monumental Compounds of Jatanca, Peru (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only John Warner.

    The Late Formative Period site of Jatanca is located in the southern sector of the Jequetepeque Valley, Peru. The five architecturally intricate monumental compounds that make up the core of this site housed sociopolitical, economic, and ritual activities that operated at a variety of interdependent scales. Recent excavations in 2014 within Compound I have further refined our knowledge of the relationships between the complex multiscalar activities that took place within these important spaces....

  • Archaeology of the 18th-Century French Colonial Metoyer Land Grant Site, Natchitoches, Louisiana (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Clete Rooney. David Morgan. Kevin MacDonald.

    Recent plans to develop a tract of land on Cane River prompted examination of a locality pivotal to understanding the colonial creole experience in northwest Louisiana. Survey work in 2011 and 2012 identified a large river front site, part of which was home to the plantations of Narcisse Prud’homme, John Plauché, and Pierre Metoyer—the latter an economically prominent colonial known for his relationship with the celebrated Marie-Thérèse Coincoin. Subsequent archival research, geophysical survey,...

  • Preliminary Testing of Facial Approximation Methods for finding the Pronasale in Children (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Simon. Hugo F.V. Cardoso.

    Facial approximation has been increasingly used in archaeological human remains but its accuracy in children is often uncertain due to the lack of research in this area. There are currently several methods in use to predict the nose pronasale position, but they have all been developed for use in adults. Considering that the face, including the nose, undergoes significant size and shape changes during growth, the validity of these methods in children is largely unknown. Preliminary testing of...

  • Small Sacred Spaces: The Results of Investigations into Subterranean Features at N950 and Grupo Agua Lluvia in northwest Belize. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kyle Ports. C.L. Kieffer. Marisol Cortes-Rincon. Rissa Trachman.

    This paper explores the ways in which the Maya conceptualized subterranean features as sacred landscapes within the Three Rivers Region in northwest Belize. Contemporary archaeological investigations have suggested that large cave systems served as important locations for rituals. The ubiquity of these features to the Maya indicate that these concepts of sacred space may have extended to regions, and sites without naturally forming caves. This research focuses on the utilization of small...

  • The Forgotten King (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David Clinnick. James Walker.

    One hundred and fifty years ago, a letter of correspondence was read aloud at a meeting of scientists in Newcastle, UK, boldly claiming for the first time that humans had not always been alone in their genus. William King, the Anglo-Irish geologist, was the first person to recognize Neanderthals as a separate species of Homo, and one of the first people to substantiate claims regarding the antiquity of man. He did not live long enough to see his proposition or name (Homo neanderthalensis)...

  • 49ers and Firm Foundations: A Short Archaeological History of San Francisco’s Civic Center (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebecca Karberg.

    As part of the work undertaken as part of the rehabilitation of the historic Federal Office Building at 50 United Nations Plaza in San Francisco, the US General Services Administration uncovered some of the remaining foundations for San Francisco’s old City Hall, which was destroyed in the earthquake of 1906. These foundations represent the easternmost extent of the city hall, which had not been previously documented. Previous work on the rehabilitation project had turned up artifacts that...

  • Red and Yellow Tracks in the Aurignacian: The Spatial Distribution of Colorants at Abri Castanet (Dordogne, France) (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joelle Nivens.

    Abri Castanet is one of the most important Early Aurignacian sites in the Dordogne (France). First excavated in the mid-20th century by early pioneers of modern excavation techniques, the site yielded invaluable insights into Paleolithic art and personal ornamentation. More recent excavations continued this trend, using total stations to precisely provenience artifacts and sieved sediment. Such rigorous methods and others have elucidated production and use patterns of stone tools, personal...

  • Comparative Social Inequality and Class Structure in Ancient Cities (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jacqueline Fox.

    Using the Gini index and associated Lorenz curve, ancient cities dispersed throughout several cultural areas and representing varied temporal periods will be compared by a representative measurement of wealth. Using residential house size in several sites where the complete extent of the residences are mapped, calculated area and volume will be used as the standard for comparison. The volume of each structure is a more representative measurement of wealth because it encompasses the cost of labor...

  • Colorful pictures: Understanding the material of the Mesoamerican precolonial codices (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ludo Snijders. Tim Zaman.

    In this session the most recent advances are presented of an ongoing interdisciplinary project aimed at better understanding the materials of which, and with which, the Mesoamerican Precolonial codices were made. These materials are as varied as ranging from turquoise from the southern United States to cochineal from Oaxaca, jaguar skins from the tropical areas and Maya Blue from the Yucatan peninsula. As such, this understanding allows for a reconstruction of the whole complex practice of...

  • Early Cultural Developments and Adaptations in Hunter/Gatherer Communities: A Case Study from Keatley Creek on the Canadian Plateau (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Suzanne Villeneuve. Brian Hayden.

    The emergence of socio-economically complex hunter/gatherer communities has been identified as one of the most critical theoretical issues in the study of early cultural evolution. In North America, one key geographical area for studying the emergence of complex hunter/gatherer societies has been the Northwest Coast and Plateau. The village site of Keatley Creek, one of the largest sites of complex hunter/gatherers in Western Canada, has featured prominently in understanding the emergence and...

  • Chemical residue and microbotanical analyses in the Royal Kitchen at Kabah, Yucatan. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Edgar Leal Hernandez. Luis J. Venegas de la Torre. Mario Zimmermann.

    Since 2010 the "Proyecto de Restauración e Investigación Arqueológica en el Grupo Este de Kabah, Yucatán", under the direction of archaeologist Lourdes Toscano, performed explorations in the area that covers structures 1C-2, 1C-3, 1C-4 y 1C-5. The goal of these interventions is bearing out the hypothesis that the group served as a special food-processing area. Excavations resulted in the recovery of faunal remains, ceramics, as well as several types of lithic tools like prismatic blades,...

  • Exploring Technological Organization through Time: Mimbres Pottery Production (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Taliaferro. Bernard Schriever. Jeff Speakman. Elizabeth Toney.

    For some time, archaeologists have sought to characterize the manner in which ceramic technology was organized in the Mimbres area of southwestern New Mexico. Recent syntheses of INAA compositional data allow for a more thorough characterization of the organization parameters associated with ceramic technology in the Mimbres region. Here, we present a more contemporary analysis of the manner in which ceramic technology was organized in the Mimbres area using Costin’s (1991) organization of...

  • Possible Functions of a Late Prehistoric Coarseware from the Estuary Zone of Eastern Soconusco (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Timothy Garfin. Sachiko Sakai. Hector Neff.

    Recent surveys in the mangrove zone of far-southern Pacific coastal Chiapas, Mexico, identified a coarse pottery, called "sewer-pipe ware," that was initially thought to have been used in sal cocida salt production during historic times. Distributional and excavation data along with functional considerations, however, point to a potentially more interesting hypothesis, namely that "sewer-pipe ware" vessels may be portable kilns or saggars used in the production of Plumbate pottery, a famous and...

  • An integrated digital approach for ceramic analysis at Baita Semati, northern Ethiopia (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Cinzia Perlingieri. Habtamu Mekonnen. Michael Harrower.

    This paper provides an overview of the methods and results of the ceramic analysis conducted in two study seasons at the archaeological site of Baita Semati, in northern Ethiopia. The work was articulated into three main steps: 1) analytical description of the morphological attributes, 2) typological classification, 3) chronological and cultural interpretation and comparisons. Our goal was to create rich records for all pottery objects that would include standardized descriptions, typological...

  • Fortified lookouts and border patrol in the Late Intermediate Period Colca Valley, Peru (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren Kohut.

    During the Late Intermediate Period (AD 1000-1450), the Colca Valley in the southern Peruvian highlands was heavily fortified. Survey of hilltop fortifications (pukaras) identified a class of large non-habitational pukaras located along the rim of the valley that were perhaps designed to monitor the vast expanses of puna surrounding the valley. Additionally, a prehispanic road which leads into the valley from the south passes through a primary defensive wall at one of the sites—further...

  • The Taphonomic Study of Small Fauna Gruta da Nova Columbeira (Portugal) (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Milena Carvalho. Jonathan Haws.

    This poster presents the results of a taphonomic study of Gruta Nova da Columbeira, a cave site containing at least six separate Middle Paleolithic occupation levels in Vale do Roto, Portugal. The valley contains at least five other caves that have been occupied at different times. Gruta da Nova Columbeira, excavated in 1963, has well-preserved faunal remains rendering it a good site for studying Neanderthal subsistence behaviors. The excavation yielded larger fauna such as red deer, ibex,...

  • ON THE TRAIL OF IVORY: MAPPING TRADE IN IRON AGE SOUTHERN AFRICA (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ashley Coutu.

    Our current knowledge of the pre-colonial ivory trade in southern Africa consists of evidence from a number of archaeological sites dating from the 7-11th centuries AD, such as Schroda, K2, Ndondonwane, and KwaGandaGanda. These sites have yielded large caches of ivory debris, suggesting that these places were centres for ivory carving/production. However, it is unknown whether raw ivory was obtained locally or brought from further afield, whether there was a standardised mode of production, and...

  • Elemental and microscopic characterization of quartzite stone discs and knives from the Slocan Narrows Pithouse Village, Upper Columbia River Region. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Micah Stimson. Nathan Goodale. David G. Bailey. Alissa Nauman.

    Chipped stone tools made from fine-grained quartzite with thin mica-rich (phyllitic) lamellae are commonly recovered from archaeological contexts along the Upper Columbia River in the interior Pacific Northwest. In this study we present the results of a comprehensive analysis of a collection of quartzite discs and knives recovered from the Slocan Narrows Pithouse Village. Our analysis includes examination of microscopic use-wear traces to attempt tool function interpretation, as well as...

  • Relatedness and Social Organization at the Ray Site (11BR104): Biological Distance Analysis of a Middle Woodland Ridge Top Cemetery (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Elissa Bullion. Jason King.

    A considerable number of biodistance studies have been conducted on archaeological populations from the Lower Illinois Valley. Many of these have included groups of remains dating to the Middle Woodland Period (50BCE to 400CE), a period which has in the past gained attention for the elaboration of burial mound complexes, intensification of horticulture, as well as proliferation of "exotic" and intricately crafted artifacts. In the Lower Illinois Valley, this period is also characterized by the...

  • Archaeological and Geomorphic Investigations of Paleoindian Sites near Smith Mountain, VA. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph Gingerich. William Childress. Daniel Wagner. Michael Johnson.

    Identification of stratified Paleoindian components in eastern North America is rare. Because few stratified sites exist, cultural chronologies and depictions of Paleoindian lifeways have been drawn from large geographic areas and warrant revision. Recent work along the upper Roanoke River in Virginia has identified several sites that show an almost complete cultural sequence from 8,000 to 13,000 calendar years ago. These sites also show the use of a unique suite of lithic raw materials during...

  • Danish Colonial Health Policy and Practice on St. Croix, US Virgin Islands (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Meredith Reifschneider.

    During the period between 1803 and 1848, a series of medical hospitals were constructed on St. Croix, US Virgin Islands in order to provide medical services to enslaved individuals in an effort to reduce mortality and morbidity. My research seeks to interrogate how medical initiatives and treatments were implemented, contested, or received by various actors, including Danish colonial doctors and nurses, plantation health care providers, and enslaved individuals. This research will be...

  • Modeling sea level rise and shoreline change in a complex sedimentary environment: Case study from Chesapeake Bay (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Leslie Reeder-Myers.

    Accurate estimates of past shoreline locations are important for archaeologist interested in the complex relationships between sea level rise and human ecology. However, shoreline reconstructions require careful consideration of highly variable eustatic, isostatic, tectonic, and sedimentary processes. In the Chesapeake Bay, records from marsh cores have produced high resolution models of relative sea level rise since the Bay first emerged between 8000-7000 BP, influenced by both global sea level...

  • Can government be self-organized? A mathematical model of the collective social organization of ancient Teotihuacan, Central Mexico (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Tom Froese. Carlos Gershenson. Linda Manzanilla.

    Teotihuacan was the first extensive urban civilization of Mesoamerica and one of the largest of the ancient world. Following a tradition in archaeology to equate social complexity with centralized hierarchy, it is still widely believed that its origin and growth was controlled by a dynastic lineage of powerful individuals. However, much data is indicative of a government of co-rulers, and artistic traditions expressed an egalitarian ideology while deemphasizing individuals. Yet this...

  • Documentation Of Lithic Artifacts Using An Inexpensive Reflectance Transformation Imaging System (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Leszek Pawlowicz.

    Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) creates a relightable virtual image of an artifact, allowing interactive manipulation of the light direction and light curve characteristics to bring out details difficult to impossible to see with the naked eye or in a photograph. One potential use of RTI is in the visual documentation of lithic artifacts, traditionally done using line drawings because of the difficulty in recording their features using still photographs. Techniques for enhancing lithic...

  • Plants in a Day: A Cost Distance Analysis of Single Day Distance to Floral Resources of the Ancestral Puebloans at Goat Springs Pueblo (LA 285) (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Casey Riggs. Suzanne Eckert.

    The way in which groups interact with their surrounding environment can provide insight into the importance of natural resources for a social group, despite having a large reliance upon cultivation for subsistence. For this study the landscape around Goat Springs Pueblo (LA 285) was analyzed to identify accessible botanical resources for the pueblo’s inhabitants. Current research has indicated that abiotic natural resources were not frequently accessed, therefore site use may have been related...

  • Lithic Technological Organization at Last Supper Cave: Reconstructing Paleoindian Mobility and Landscape Use at an Upland Site in Northwestern Nevada (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Danielle Felling.

    Excavations at Last Supper Cave (LSC), Nevada by Tom Layton and Jonathan Davis in the early 1970s revealed an extensive record of occupation including a Paleoindian component recently re-dated to ~10,300 14C B.P. Despite the potential for the site to reveal information about Paleoindian lifeways in the Great Basin during the Terminal Pleistocene/Early Holocene (TP/EH), analysis of these early artifacts, including numerous Great Basin stemmed projectile points, tools, and debitage, was never...

  • Spatial and chronological components of Middle Stone Age artifact assemblage variability in deeply buried alluvial fan contexts (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sheila Nightingale. Marina Bravo Foster. Jessica Thompson. Jeong-Heon Choi. David Wright.

    Alluvial fan deposition characterizes the geological setting of many Stone Age sites in the East African Rift System. In these settings, researchers must consider multiple origins of technological variability, such as chronology, spatial trends, and depositional history. Because of logistical constraints, deeply buried artifacts in alluvial fans can only be examined through small excavation windows or where deposits have been heavily eroded. Under both scenarios, variability in in situ artifact...

  • Recent Excavations and Current Research at Spiro Mounds (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott Hammerstedt. Patrick Livingood. Amanda Regnier.

    Geophysical survey at Spiro provided evidence for dozens of contemporaneous structures near the well-known Craig mound. Over the last year, four of those structures were excavated by University of Oklahoma field crews. This paper will discuss the results of those excavations and discuss whether the evidence supports James A. Brown's recent interpretation of an early 15th century 'Event' at Spiro. SAA 2015 abstracts made available in tDAR courtesy of the Society for American Archaeology and...

  • A Hunter’s Paradise: a zooarchaeological analysis of hunting practices in the Kankakee Marsh (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Bryan Dull. Mark Schurr. Terrance Martin. Tamatha Patterson.

    From about 16,000 BCE to the early 20th century, the Kankakee Marsh was a vast wetland covering about a million acres in northern Indiana and Illinois. Today the marsh covers about one percent of its original area. After Removal Period, the marsh was famous among hunters for its abundant populations of fur bearing mammals and waterfowl. A regional analysis of the Kankakee Marsh is conducted to analyze the intersite variability of the faunal remains recovered. These sites date from the Archaic to...

  • Relations in the Zuni Region: A Comparative Study of Ceramics (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Newcomb.

    In the Cibola region of the American southwest, the Pueblo III to Pueblo IV transition saw a major increase in the local production of red ware and polychrome vessels. In addition, the period is characterized by a dramatic increase in ceramic decorative style diversity in the Cibola region. In this poster, I present evidence for shifts in settlement patterns and community organization, including collective actions and social transformations in the Zuni region during the Pueblo III and Pueblo...

  • Inscribed Places: Examining Rock Art Sites on the Pajarito Plateau (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alison Livesay.

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), one constantly encounters cultural remains of the past, whether they are of research buildings utilized during the Manhattan Era, or the remnants of dwellings of Pre-Columbian farmers on the Pajarito Plateau. Rock art sites are often encountered places where images of various meanings have been physically pecked and scratched out by people inscribing their identities and worldviews onto the surrounding landscape. Because a landscape can persist in form...

  • Searching for Continuity in the Hinterlands: Households at Rancho San Lorenzo’s Floodplain North Settlement Cluster, Belize (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Tiffany Lindley.

    In this paper I will summarize the results of the 2013 and 2014 field seasons at the Floodplain North settlement cluster, located within the Rancho San Lorenzo Survey Area in the Mopan River Valley, Belize. Investigations sought to identify continuous occupation from the Late Classic to Postclassic periods. Maya occupation at Rancho San Lorenzo peaked in the Late Classic, followed by a drastic decrease in population levels. However, pedestrian survey undertaken in 2013 revealed Postclassic...

  • 3D Scanning of Bronze: Repeatability and Reliability across scanners. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kristina Golubiewski-Davis.

    As 3D scanning is integrated into the archaeological tool kit, more objects are being captured using a variety of scanning methods and specific scanners. This poster explores how laser scanning, white light scanning, and photogrammetry compare across the Next Engine, Breukmann (300mm and 90mm lenses), David SLS-2 (30mm and 60mm pattern sizes), and photogrammetry (compiled with Agisoft Photoscan) using a Gauge Repeatability and Reliabity test. Five objects were scanned five times using each of...

  • The use of geochemical analysis and visual methods for understanding raw material acquisition around Amud Cave, Israel (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ravid Ekshtain. Erella Hovers. Shimon Ilani. Irina Segal.

    Amud Cave (eastern Upper Galilee, Israel) is known for its Middle Paleolithic deposits, containing thousands of animal bones and lithic artifacts from 3 anthropogenic stratigraphic units, dated to 68-55 ka. Excavations revealed hominin remains, including Neanderthal burials. Technological characteristics of the lithic assemblage show that the knapping sequence started off-site. However, related mobility patterns remained poorly understood. In order to understand the organizational decisions made...

  • Forensic Archaeological Research in the Recovery of WWII MIA’s on a Pacific atoll: Tarawa (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Agamemnon Pantel. Mark Noah. Kristen Baker. Chester Walker. Jay Silverstein.

    Archaeological research on 538 MIA’s from WWII has been ongoing on the Pacific atoll of Tarawa over the past two years under the auspices of History Flight, an NGO. Tarawa, one of the bloodiest WWII battles in the Pacific, still has hundreds of MIA’s unaccounted for in one of the most densely populated locations on earth. History Flight, with the collaboration of professionals, para-professionals, military volunteers, DOD and the local community have been successful in locating and recovering...

  • Macro-regional cultural development of the Interior Columbia Plateau (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Carol Schultze, PhD.

    Despite a wealth of data and continued opportunities for data collection, the prehistory of the Interior Columbia Plateau of the Northwestern United States continues to be organized and discussed on the basis of a handful of local regional chronologies. Many of those popularly in use were created decades ago and (in spite of a few notable exceptions) there remains a need for the archaeological community to generate a more synthetic chronology. This paper tests the premise that cultural...

  • A Tale of Two Styles: A Geoarchaeological Investigation into Lima & Ychsma Construction Materials at Cajamarquilla, Peru (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Nichole Bettencourt. Rafael Segura-Llanos.

    This paper examines construction materials from Cajamarquilla, one of the largest prehistoric urban sites on the Central Coast of Peru. Little work has been published about the architecture at Cajamarquilla, other than to comment on the enormity of the site and its constructions. Rammed earth (tapia, in Spanish) is the main construction style at Cajamarquilla, but with marked observable differences between the Lima Phase (AD500 – 800) and Ychsma Phase (AD1100 – 1450) occupations. Lima walls were...

  • The Kashaya Pomo Cultural Landscape Project: A Community-Based Approach (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Katherine Dowdall. Otis Parrish. Margaret Purser. John Wingard.

    In order to more effectively co-steward Kashaya Pomo cultural resources, the California Department of Transportation and the Kashaya Pomo Tribe conducted a multi-year community-based cultural landscape study. This study documents that for some as yet immeasurable time back into antiquity, the lives of Kashaya ancestors were structured by a landscape that included burn-managed ecosystem components, clearings for villages and other Kashaya places, trails, and boundaries. Their accumulated bank of...

  • Oneota Subsistence Practices at the Christenson Site (13PK407) (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Amanda Bernemann.

    The Christenson site (13PK407) is a Moingona phase Oneota site along the Des Moines River, dating to around AD 1250. Excavations took place in both 1983 and 2001 in order to salvage the site from erosion by the Des Moines River. Analysis of the 1983 deer remains indicated a mid- to late-winter season of death, suggesting that the Christenson site represented a winter occupation, This season of occupations differs from other Moingona phase Oneota sites, and this reanalysis of the 2001 faunal...

  • In the Twilight of a Brave New World: From Multimedia Work Areas to Material Transformations in the Late Chalcolithic and Neolithic in Bulgaria and North Greece (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Petya Hristova.

    Putting together gold and graphite to decorate a pot for example, has not become a widespread practice in the Balkan later prehistory but a mark of an intriguing entanglement of innovation and tradition, materials and images. This paper considers evidence of specialist production according to Costin's model as it can be surmised on the basis of data from Chalcolithic and Late Neolithic contexts in Bulgaria and north Greece. It reflects on how mixing materials and techniques in search for a...

  • Redefining Configurations of Urban Settings in Steppe Societies (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Bryan Miller. James A. Johnson.

    Despite exciting turns in archaeological approaches to ‘urbanism’ emphasizing smaller-scale or lower-density occupations, the study of urban centers among mobile pastoral groups continues to escape notice. The development of urban centers associated with intensive production, exchange, and habitation are often deemed incompatible with societies that have mobile components, or are engaged in greater mobility related to pastoral production. Nevertheless, numerous Eurasian steppe societies have...

  • Catholic Burial as Native Resistance in Post-Dissolution Ireland (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Rachel Scott. Finola O'Carroll.

    The Dominican friary in Trim, County Meath, Ireland, was founded in AD 1263 by Geoffrey de Geneville, Lord of Trim. An important religious center, the Black Friary was used for burial during the late Middle Ages both by the Dominican friars and by lay individuals living around the town. In 1540, as part of the dissolution of the monasteries, the commissioners of King Henry VIII suppressed the friary and sold its lands, buildings, and goods. However, although the site no longer possessed formal...

  • Granite and pXRF: An Experimental Approach to Nondestructive Sourcing of Ground Stone Tools (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Tawny Tibbits. Ellie Harrison-Buck. Terry Powis.

    Portable x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) is a rapidly spreading yet controversial technology in archaeology. Current research on pXRF technology has produced marked improvements in calibration standards and accuracy of results. Previous studies using pXRF have focused primarily on obsidian and basalt; however with current advances in technology it is possible and necessary to test the applicability of pXRF to accurately characterize heterogeneous materials. This research proposes a methodology for...

  • Internally Divided: An Archaeological Investigation of a Jamaican Slave Village, 1766 to 1838 (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Hayden Bassett.

    On the large-scale sugar plantations of the Caribbean, enslaved Africans were forced into dense communities on the scale of small urban townships. In many cases, the "slave village" site was allotted by the plantation owner, though the internal composition was largely left to the choices and dynamics of the enslaved community. This poster summarizes the findings from a recent archaeological survey of the slave village of Good Hope estate, an 18th/early-19th-century sugar plantation in northern...

  • Starch and Ceramics: Dietary Transition and Technology in the Sigatoka Valley, Fiji (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicole Hernandez. Julie Field. John Dudgeon. Christopher Roos.

    Food production and manipulation, as well as associated technologies during Fijian prehistory are understudied archaeologically. Human colonization of Fiji occurred circa 2640 BP. Colonists subsisted on a diet composed of marine resources (fish, shellfish), and terrestrial fauna (bats, birds, tortoises). In contrast, 1,000 years later, most Fijians had transitioned to a fully agricultural diet. The contemporary Fijian diet centers on cultivated starches, imported originally by Fiji's colonists,...

  • On The Waterfront...Or Not: Investigating the Relationship Between Late Archaic Landuse Patterns and Hafted Biface Curation in the Midsouth (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Judith Melton. Jesse W. Tune.

    During the Late Archaic period in the Midsouth United States people appear to have practiced seasonal landuse patterns. Warm weather aggregation sites were located along major rivers in the region, while upland site locations reflect occupations of dispersed populations during colder periods. To understand how people organized biface technology within such a seasonal mobility pattern, we analyzed the relative curation rate of hafted bifaces from multiple sites. Magnolia Valley (40RD314)...

  • Isotope diachronic changes in Armenia during Neolithic and Chalcolithic period: Environment, herding strategies, human dietary practices (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Estelle Herrscher. Adrian Balasescu. Modwene Poulmarc'h. Valentin Radu. Roman Hovsepyan.

    The Caucasus, at the crossroads of Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia, is a key region to investigate the modalities of the distribution of plants. Our study aims at documenting the presence of C4 plants, wild and domestic as millet crop and detecting their management and consumption through this area using stable isotope analysis of human and animal remains. Two Armenian archaeological sites, Aknashen (Late Neolithic) and Godedzor (Late Chalcolithic), allowed a detailed sampling of 95...

  • Loon, Fish, and Beaver: Inland Lake subsistence and settlement from the northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Beverley Smith.

    Small Late Woodland period occupation sites around Hubbard Lake, MI provide a rare opportunity to examine the empirical evidence of seasonality and subsistence from faunal assemblages in the Upper Great Lakes region in light of long-standing models. While much work has been done regarding the Inland Shore fishery of the Upper Great Lakes, there have been few opportunities to consider Inland Lake localities and their importance in Juntunen phase strategies of settlement and subsistence. SAA...

  • Macrobotanical Investigation of Sonaji, Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Benjamin West. Maria Bruno.

    This poster presents the results of a macrobotanical analysis from the site of Sonaji, Bolivia located on the Taraco Peninsula in the Lake Titicaca Basin of the Andes. Sonaji is a low mound built from generations of occupations through the Formative (1500BC-AD 500) and Tiwanaku (AD 500-1100) periods. We consider eleven macrobotanical samples from diverse contexts (middens, floors, pits). These data, when interpreted with ethnographic data and past paleoethnobotanical research from the region,...

  • Slippery Oysters & a Cold Beer: Incorporating Food into Archaeology Education (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Nohe. Michael Thomin.

    Through outreach and education, The Florida Public Archaeology Network, promotes the public appreciation and value of Florida's archaeological heritage. Food has regularly been used as a fun learning device in classroom settings: from teaching excavation techniques using a chocolate chip cookie to finding core samples in a PB&J. Public events held in cafés or over a pizza seem to break down social barriers and garner greater community cohesion. Recently, we have taken this one step further by...

  • The Micro Seriation of Chupadero Black-on-White (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Angel Pena. William Walker. Sunnie Sartin.

    In this poster we examine the Chupadero Black on White ceramic tradition of the Jornada Magollon cultural area located in the American Southwest. In search of microstlylistic variations within the Chupadero Black on White, we argue that this ceramic tradition can be classified into smaller phases or styles for more exact dating methods. Examples of this type of practice has been demonstrated in the Mimbres Black on White ceramic tradition, which had been the only white wear of the cultural area...

  • Holocene Precipitation Variability in Northern Baja California: Correlating Lithic Abundance and Climatic Change from Scorpion Shelter (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordan Myers.

    In order to understand human adaptation to climatic regimes, I compare lithic assemblages and oxygen isotope values from kangaroo rat remains found at the hunter-gatherer shellfish-collecting site of Scorpion Shelter in coastal northwestern Baja California. Scorpion Shelter is important because it contains a continuous faunal record for a coastal community that spans from the terminal Pleistocene through the Holocene (~11,600 BP – present). Using Human Behavioral Ecology, we would expect to see...

  • The complete genome sequence of a 45,000-year-old modern human from Eurasia (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Qiaomei Fu.

    We have sequenced to high coverage the genome of a femur recently discovered near Ust-Ishim in western Siberia. The bone was directly carbon-dated to 45,000 years before present. Analyses of the relationship of the Ust-Ishim individual to present-day humans show that he is closely related to the ancestral population shared between present-day Europeans and present-day Asians. The over-all amount of genomic admixture from Neandertals is similar to that in present-day non-Africans and there is no...

  • Oxygen and Carbon Isotope Chemistry and Maize Beer Consumption in the Prehistoric Andes: An Experimental Pilot Study (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Weston McCool. Joan Brenner Coltrain.

    The consumption of alcohol in prehistory is a much-studied subject, largely because alcoholic beverages were often central to social engagement, and the organization of many political, economic and religious institutions. While the role of alcohol is known to have been an important component of many societies, the ability to recognize alcohol in prehistoric contexts has proven difficult. As a result of this, many authors investigating alcohol in prehistory have used indirect indicators such as...

  • Quantifying Pre-Industrial to Mid-Late 20th Century Anthropogenic Lead and Mercury Pollution in Caribbean Marine Environments (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Felicia Pena. Molly Zuckerman. Nicholas Herrmann. Evan Peacock.

    Various lines of evidence indicate that levels of anthropogenic pollutants, such as lead and mercury, have increased in terrestrial and atmospheric environments since the early 19th century and the advent of industrialization. While exposure to these two heavy metals is a global concern, this study focused primarily on marine environments located in the Caribbean. Using ICP-MS, this study aimed to detect and quantify anthropogenic pollutants, specifically lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg), using...

  • The Ancient Methone Intensive Survey Project: New Research at a Harbor City in the North Aegean (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only MaryAnn Kontonicolas. C. Myles Chykerda.

    Methone (located in Pieria, Greece) was a key trading hub in the prehistoric and historic North Aegean, visible in the discovery of an array of workshops, production tools, and imported artifacts, and by some of the earliest evidence for the Greek alphabet in the Mediterranean. The 2014-2016 Ancient Methone Archaeological Project aims to enrich our understanding of the settlement and situate it within the wider Mediterranean world. The principal components of the project–intensive surface...

  • Us vs Them: Identity Formation in Pre-Hispanic Tlaxcala (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Witt. Nadia Johnson.

    Tlaxcala occupies a unique position in the history of New Spain, due both to its alliance with Cortés against the Aztec and to its mid-16th century flourishing as a model republica de Indios. Spanish and indigenous chroniclers throughout the colonial period spoke of the tlaxcaltequidad—the strong regional identity and patriotism that characterized the state. We believe that this is not merely the product of Spanish favoritism and elite opportunism post-Conquest, but rather, the development of a...

  • Archaeological Landscapes and Districts and Section 106 of the NHPA - Examples from California (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica Tudor.

    Archaeological sites have traditionally been considered only as potentially eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion D (data potential) of the NRHP, but professionals in the field of Cultural Resources Management have begun to push for archaeological sites to be considered under Criteria A (significant events), B (significant people), and C (artistic value or method of construction) as well. Furthermore, archaeological sites are increasingly considered...

  • Bosutswe Landscapes: Defining African Complexity through Spatial Archaeometry (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Carla Klehm. Eileen Ernenwein. Katie Simon. Jeremy Menzer. Mica Jones.

    This multi-component project addresses how societies in Iron-Age Botswana (550-1650 CE) experienced the change from small, rural-centered life to centralized power based on increasing involvement in trade across the Indian Ocean. How this change occurred remains a central focus, with increasing pressures on the environment in this desert-margin landscape a likely contributing factor. It features the Bosutswe region, situated on the eastern edge of the Kalahari Desert, where the site of Bosutswe...

  • Illicit Trade Networks in Spanish Texas (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Casey Hanson.

    This poster presents the results of an investigation of the contraband market and frontier trade networks that existed in Spanish Colonial and Mexican Texas. The archaeological record dating to the late 18th and early 19th centuries in San Antonio is defined by the appearance of English-made goods, predominately refined English earthenwares, illegally imported from New Orleans. This investigation compared artifact collections and documents from the Bexar Archives spanning the Colonial Period...

  • Ground-penetrating radar and terrestrial laser scanning reconstruction of the prison and Civil War era historic fortifications on Alcatraz Island (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark Everett. Timothy S. de Smet. Robert Warden. Tanya Komas. Jason Hagin.

    Between 2012 and 2013 we conducted a cultural resources assessment and historic preservation project with the National Park Service on Alcatraz Island using terrestrial laser scanning and ground-penetrating radar. Alcatraz is most (in)famous for its brief period as a Federal Penitentiary (1934-1963); however, for the vast majority of its history it was a military fortification – Fortress Alcatraz - under the U.S. Army. As the need for harbor defense diminished, the island was converted into a...

  • Art and the Ancestors: Sculpture from the Cave Complex at Quen Santo, Guatemala (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Caitlin Earley.

    At the site of Quen Santo, Guatemala, a hilltop center overlies an elaborate cave complex. First documented by Eduard Seler, the caves at Quen Santo have also been explored by modern-day archaeologists. Missing from modern analyses of Quen Santo, however, is a consideration of sculpture from the site: Seler recovered almost thirty stone monuments, most related to themes of death, ritual, and the ancestors. In this paper I explore the sculptural corpus of Quen Santo for the first time, arguing...

  • Making History Personal: Community-Focused Archaeology in the Nevada City Cemetery, Nevada City, Montana (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Marsha Fulton. Crystal Alegria.

    The small cemetery overlooking Nevada City, Montana, holds this history of the town in a unique and personal way. To the nearby descendants, the cemetery symbolizes the continuity of family, community and history. In August, 2014, Extreme History partnered with Project Archaeology to map and assess the cemetery as part of a Teacher Workshop. The project revealed the value of the personal community connection to sacred places. By working with descendant members of the community, we were able to...

  • Comparative analysis of ceramic assemblages from 18th century Caribbean enslaved populations (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Reese Cook.

    Multiple ceramic samples were type identified and analyzed for the use in a regional comparative analysis of enslaved populations. The sampled ceramics were obtained from multiple contexts collected from various Caribbean locations. The comparative analyses clarify social dynamics, prosperity, and sustainability within enslaved populations. Afro-Caribbean, colonial tradewares, and exotics were compared by quantifying frequency and present/absent along with the level of diversity in the local...

  • Exceptionalism and Raw Material Choice in Western European Early Upper Palaeolithic Symbolism (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Ranlett.

    Since the Lower Palaeolithic, rare, exotic and unusual mineral and fossilized materials (e.g. amber, jet, belemnite, ammonite, soapstone) have constituted objects of interest for humans and our recent ancestors across Eurasia and Africa. There are examples of novel materials being collected, curated and/or minimally modified since nearly the beginning of prehistory. Beginning in the Upper Paleolithic, a number of these raw materials became, for the first time, a habitual part of human...

  • Mesocarnivores and the Human Niche (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ximena Lemoine.

    Human settlements and occupations of any size or length present novel selective pressures and scenarios not only for the human populations composing them, but also for wild plant and animal communities surrounding them. The presence of human settlements, particularly those with increasing sedentism and intensified local landscape use, have lasting effects on wild animal communities as they interact with, tolerate, and even utilize human spaces. What happens to wild animal populations when they...

  • Rock Art and Prehistoric Roads: The Connection in Southern Peru (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David Reid.

    The site Toro Muerto, located in the Majes Valley of southern Peru, constitutes one of the largest and better studied rock art sites in South America. Approaching Toro Muerto through a ‘landscapes perspective,’ we can situate the site within a changing ideological, socio-economic, and political landscape beginning in the Middle Horizon (A.D. 600-1000) to the 18th century Colonial-period. This paper goes beyond the typical site-level analysis to place Toro Muerto at the center of a southern...

  • The Results of Using Associated Records to Facilitate New Research: Recent Excavations at the Elk Mountain Site (48CR301) (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jody Clauter.

    The Elk Mountain site (48CR301), also known as the Garrett Allen site, is located in south-central Wyoming in the Carbon Basin along Halleck Ridge. The site was excavated every year from 1969 until 1978, and a University of Wyoming field school was held at the site in 1979 and 1980. The excavations were highly productive and recovered artifacts included ceramics, manos, and metates; large amounts of lithic debris, tools, and faunal remains. Despite its productivity, a site report, site map...

  • New bioarchaeological evidence for Guangala and Manteño-Huancavilca Cultures in Santa Elena peninsula (Southern Ecuadorian coast). (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Erick López Reyes. Jonathan Santana Cabrera. Lourdes Colcha Guamán. Domingo C. Salazar García. Juan Abella Pérez.

    In this contribution we present the preliminary results of a study that addresses the funerary practices and the osteobiographical profile of various sites from Guangala culture (Regional Development Period, 300 BC-800AD) and Manteño-Huancavilca culture (Integration Period, 800AD-1530AD). In this case, we have investigated human remains from the Guangala site OGSE-46 from Samarina, several locations from the Manteño-Huancavilca period in La Libertad (OGSE-47) and Chanduy; most of them have not...

  • Digital Solutions in an Imperfect World: Digital Asset Management, Outreach and the Crisis in Curation (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joel Zovar.

    Difficult realities have set in for some cultural resource professionals. Space (and funding) to protect cultural materials is at a premium, causing some curators and archaeologists to think about heritage preservation and site conservation in new ways. Using the presenter’s experiences developing an archaeology outreach website, this paper explores how digital asset management has become a useful addition to traditional methods of artifact and site conservation in Louisiana, a state with a rich...

  • The Power and Narrative of Liminality: The Quadripartite Badge in Maya Iconography (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Victoria Ingalls.

    Ancient Maya iconography primarily depicted elite individuals in idealized states of being and rationalized their power and authority through ideological concepts. This study reexamines previous assumptions made concerning the Quadripartite Badge. This motif is examined based on iconographic associations and contexts, as well as temporal and spatial distributions. The spread of this motif is demonstrated through time and its spatial dispersals are noted for their political consequences. It is...

  • From Orioles to Airplanes: O’odham Traditional Cultural Properties and Traditions of Travel through the Western Papaguería (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Maren Hopkins.

    Ethnographic research conducted on Barry M. Goldwater Range East with members of the Tohono O’odham Nation identified a series of ancient and historic travel routes relevant in O’odham history and contemporary traditions. These routes range from ancient foot trails leading to the Sea of Cortez to historic wagon roads and modern highways connecting O’odham communities. The O’odham commemorate important places in their history through place-naming, storytelling, songs, and traditional cultural...

  • Utilizing Visual Resource Management to Assess Effects on Historic Properties; Working within the BLM VRM Framework (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Morgan.

    This paper will provide an overview of using the established Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Visual Resource Management (VRM) system to assess indirect visual effects on historic properties. Per Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the introduction of visual elements that diminish the integrity of the property’s significant historic features constitutes an adverse effect. The VRM system was designed to inventory landscapes, identify those with high scenic values worth...

  • Investigation and Analysis of Anthills Found in Archaeological Settings in the Northern Great Basin. (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Amy Nelson. Jordan Pratt.

    Anthills are ubiquitous across the Great Basin, with the potential to affect archaeological sites through bioturbation. This study considers if lithic debitage found on the surface of anthills (and within) represents the redistribution of specific size grades, with an emphasis on vertical redistribution of smaller flakes from below ground to the surface. Our study targeted anthills near previously analyzed lithic plots around the perimeter of Rimrock Draw Rockshelter (35HA3855), a Paleoamerican...

  • Putting Xultun on the Map (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Adam Vitale.

    This poster shall illustrate the several different mapping phases of the archaeological site of Xultun, Guatemala in order to demonstrate how the mapping process has significantly altered our understanding of the site. Xultun was first surveyed by Sylvanus Morely in the 1920’s whose maps included a handful of structures and stelae. The site remained largely uninvestigated for the next 50 years until Von Euw expanded the map, through his epigraphic work for the Peabody Museum. Xultun’s map did...

  • Pueblo I/Pueblo II subsistence strategy in Klethla Valley: a view from a resource processing/storage site along Begashibito Wash (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark Brodbeck. Deil Lundin.

    The Arizona Department of Transportation conducted a highway widening project on US 160 between Cow Springs and Tonalea which required archaeological excavations at site AZ-J-33-35 (NN) as mitigation. The site is along Begashibito Wash in the western reaches of the Klethla Valley in northern Arizona. The excavations at AZ-J-33-35 (NN) uncovered an architecturally unique resource processing/storage site where locally available plants and corn were harvested, processed, and stored. Evidence for...

  • Life on the Edge: An Investigation of 18th Century Spanish Colonial Subsistence Strategies in the Northern Rio Grande (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lucy Gill. Gabrielle Borenstein. Adam Watson.

    The 18th century Northern Rio Grande basin of New Mexico was a politically volatile and contested landscape. Hispano settlers, including those who established the aldea of San Antonio del Embudo (now Dixon, New Mexico) along the Embudo River in 1725, found themselves entangled in a complex web of socioeconomic interactions and, at times, hostilities with diverse indigenous peoples. To what extent did these Spanish colonists adhere to European subsistence strategies or embrace native foodways? Do...

  • Taphonomy and Negative Results: An Integrated Approach to Residue Analysis (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Barker. Jonathan Dombrosky. Amy Eddins. Kari Schlerer. Barney Venables.

    Residue preservation within the matrices of artifacts is a complex process that can be better understood when multiple types of biomolecules (e.g., protein and fatty acid residues) are evaluated as part of a systematic whole. Commonly, types of residues are evaluated independently, which may relate to different types of biomolecules requiring distinctive methods for extraction and analysis. Thus, the archaeologist either encounters positive results (a hit for a particular residue, such as a...

  • Mistaken identity?: A reassessment of the Angel Mounds historic cemetery site using anthroposcopic and XRF analyses (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jayne-Leigh Thomas. Meghan Buchanan. April Sievert. Heather Alvey. Lee Drake.

    In 1940, a collection of human skeletons were excavated from a historic cemetery on Mound F at Angel Mounds State Historic Site, near Evansville, Indiana. Based on the presence of a single historic grave stone, these remains were determined to be Euroamerican. However, after further study of morphological characteristics and copper staining, we suggest that several individuals are of Native American descent. An evaluation of the elemental composition of the copper staining using a portable X-ray...

  • An Archaeological and Historical Inquiry of Andagua, Peru, 1000-1800AD (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexander Menaker.

    This paper outlines developing dissertation research that integrates archaeological and historical evidence about the community of Andagua and the Ayo Valley in the Southern Peruvian Andes. Constructed as a Spanish colonial reducción, Andagua resides in a seldom-visited highland area, and today is merely considered a rural, provincial neighbor of Arequipa. Andagua, however, has a striking past evident in the substantial prehispanic remains that surround and lie buried beneath the contemporary...

  • Geoarchaeological Methods for Sediment Samples from Northwestern Belize (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Luisa Aebersold.

    The Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area (RBCMA) is an area comprised of over 260,000 acres of protected land, which is owned and managed by Programme for Belize (PfB), an entirely Belizean conservation organization. This area is ideal for geoarchaeological research that encompasses human-environment relationships by analyzing sediments. This poster will present methods and results on preliminary geoarchaeological techniques completed on sediments at the University of Texas at Austin in...

  • Paleoenvironmental Change and Megafaunal Extinction at Page-Ladson, Florida (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Angelina Perrotti. Michael Waters. Jessi Halligan.

    Sporormiella sp. is a coprophilous fungi associated with large herbivore dung that can be used as a proxy to track megafaunal extinctions. The data is based on its abundance or absence within dated sediments, which is often presented as a percentage related to the total pollen sum. This poster presents the results of a fossil pollen and Sporomiella analysis from a sediment core extracted from the Page-Ladson Site, located in a sinkhole in the Aucilla River, Florida. The 5 meter core spans the...

  • How Archaeologists Can Identify Human Resilience and Vulnerability to Climatic Conditions (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott Ingram.

    If interdisciplinary concepts such as resilience and vulnerability are to be useful to archaeologists, then understandable methods of identifying these complex social phenomena are needed. Archaeological approaches that use familiar methods and material indicators will encourage exploration of these interdisciplinary concepts. This presentation will demonstrate how both human resilience and vulnerability to climatic conditions can be identified using changes in residential abandonment rates...

  • Problems at the Peaks: A Zooarchaeological Analysis of Subsistence Stress at Elden Pueblo (2015)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah MacDonald.

    When past populations experienced extended periods of resource shortages, acquisition and processing strategies changed to secure enough food. Understanding how faunal materials reflect those prehistoric reactions to subsistence stress remains a relatively unexplored topic in Southwest archaeology. Elden Pueblo, located in Northern Arizona, provides insight into this topic. As one of the final Sinagua occupation sites in the San Francisco Peaks region, the site’s abandonment during a cool and...