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Paper / Report Submission (General Sessions)

Part of: Society for Historical Archaeology 2017


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Documents

  • The 1839 Parker Academy: On the Frontier of Transformative Resistance and Social Justice (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435402] Peggy Brunache. Sharyn Jones.

    The Parker Academy, founded in 1839 in southern Ohio, was the first secondary school in the country to house multiracial, coeducational classrooms. Furthermore, several primary sources suggest it was also a participatory component of the Underground Railroad network. This paper highlights our findings of recent excavations and continuing archival research to explore how the school was a site of everyday resistance under a framework of transformative change through education for a multi-racial...

  • The 18th Century Shipbuilding French Industry : New Perspective on Conception and Construction (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434715] Marijo Gauthier-Bérubé.

    The Machault, a French frigate, sank in Chaleur Bay, Québec, in the context of the Seven Years War, in 1760. Built in Bayonne, the archaeological analysis of the frigate gave us a unique vision of the 18th century shipbuilding industry. Coming from a privation shipyard next to the Arsenal of Bayonne, the Machault lay amidst a clash between regional shipbuilding traditions and the globalisation of naval techniques in Europe.   The study of the ship’s structural remains provides a unique view of...

  • 19th-Century Innovation at a 21st-Century Industrial Park: Archaeological Investigations at the Valentine and Company Iron Ore Washing Plant, Centre County, Pennsylvania (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434651] Gary F. Coppock.

    It was during a standard Phase I archaeological survey for a proposed Centre County industrial park that the buried remains of a 19th-century industrial plant − the Valentine Iron Ore Washing Plant (36CE526) − were discovered.  Subsequent investigations revealed not only the layout of the facility, but also the important role that a local ironmaster had on the entire iron industry.  In 1815 several Valentine brothers relocated to Centre County to lease an idle iron furnace.  Soon they were...

  • 300 Years: Archival and Archaeological Investigations at the Mission San Antonio de Valero (The Alamo) Probable First Site (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435497] Kay Hindes. Susan R Snow.

    The Mission San Antonio de Valero (known as The Alamo) was established in 1718, by Father Antonio Olivares. The mission was believed to be located in its first location for about 12 months before it was moved to a second location. The third and final location is where it is located today in Alamo Plaza. The first site location has been lost for almost 300 years. In February, 2013, Kay Hindes, City Archaeologist for the City of San Antonio located a number of artifacts that are colonial in age in...

  • 37 Pounds of Beads!: Reconstructing Provenience and Looking for Change and Continuity in an Orphaned Collection (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435468] Melanie S Lerman.

    This paper aims to understand processes of change and continuity by examining how the introduction of European manufactured glass beads in the 16th-19th centuries affected preexisting native shell bead consumption strategies in Southern California. Data from two different coastal burial sites that were occupied by the Tongva/Gabrieliño people will be analyzed; one from an 1877 excavation on Santa Catalina Island that has virtually no provenience information, and another from more recent...

  • 3D in the Toolbox: An Operational Comparison of Acoustic, Photogrammetric, and Laser Scanning Methodologies Tested at Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary in 2016. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435442] John C. Bright.

    The clear, fresh waters of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary offer an ideal testing ground for acoustic and light-based imaging systems. During the 2016 field season, Thunder Bay researchers conducted several field operations to acquire, process, and compare side scan sonar, multibeam sonar, laser-scanner, and photogrammetric data at numerous archaeological shipwreck sites. The resulting analysis provided valuable insights into this array of remote sensing systems in terms of their ability...

  • Abandoned Rural Settlements and Landscape Transformations in the Early Modern and Modern Period: Innovative Methodological Approaches of Historical Archaeology within a Central European Context (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435484] Lukáš Holata. Michal Preusz.

    Settlement and landscape transformations in Central Europe during the Early Modern/Modern period were beyond interest until 1990s and, ironically, remain insufficiently recognised despite better preservation of sites, larger collections of artefacts and broader data sources. Nevertheless, complexity of sites, often with extensive destructions, and a requirement of integration very variable data sources (especially a combination with written evidence and historical maps is significant) generate a...

  • Accuracy of Underwater Photogrammetric Methods: The Case Study of the Invincible Wreck Site (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435520] Benjamin Jones. Fraser Sturt.

    This report presents an accuracy analysis of the 2016 underwater photogrammetric survey of the HMS Invincible, an at-risk British wreck of historic import, which afforded the opportunity to compare the three-dimensional models generated by a variety of widely available cameras. In a two-phase project, photogrammetric data from the Invincible wreck site was compared against swath bathymetry, and the cameras used onsite were tested on reference objects under controlled pool conditions. The results...

  • An Adaptive Legacy: Repurposing Lighthouses from Navigational Aids to Heritage Tourism Destinations in North Carolina (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434721] Lauren M Christian.

    The lighthouses of North Carolina were originally constructed to aid navigation through treacherous waterways, but the advancement of modern navigational equipment has diminished their necessity for that purpose. In 2000, the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act was enacted to see to the transference of federally owned historic light stations to qualified new stewards. Today, the National Parks Service, private organizations, and community associations manage the lighthouses on the...

  • Advancing interpretation of USS Monitor through digital reconstruction (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435411] Hannah E. Piner.

    It can be difficult to interact with a large artifact actively undergoing conservation treatment and desalination. The artifact is almost constantly submerged in a treatment bath making it impossible or impractical for the archaeologist to study the particularities and imperfections of the object. This can postpone significant archaeological interpretation for years. By digitally reconstructing USS Monitor’s iconic gun turret, using photogrammetry and laser scanning, USS Monitor Center staff at...

  • Advancing The Study Of Cultural Frontiers In Post-Medieval Ireland – Native Innovation In The Face Of Colonial Power (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435412] Paul J Logue.

    Historical archaeology in the north of Ireland offers much to the global debate on identity and cultural interaction. There, social order in the post-medieval period has been portrayed as representing a culturally isolated conservative society: a point of contrast with ‘civilised’ Europe. North Irish elites are traditionally believed to have used earth and timber indigenous sites as alternatives to a supposedly more mainstream European architectural lexicon. Recent studies challenge this...

  • African Americans, Resistance, and the Spiritual Alteration of the Physical Environment on the Levi Jordan Plantation, Brazoria County, Tx (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435439] Tara Ruttley. Cynthia Ericson. Kenneth Brown.

    In 1986, the University of Houston began conducting archaeological excavations at the Levi-Jordan Plantation in Brazoria County, Tx in an effort to recover contextual material that would reveal information about the enslaved community, sharecroppers, and tenants who lived at the plantation. Established in 1848, the plantation was home to nearly 150 slaves at its pre-civil war peak, and was a major producer of both sugar and cotton. Early excavations of the curer’s cabin and church revealed...

  • America Loses a Star and Stripe. The First Full-Scale Battle of the Southern Winter Campaign of 1778-1779, the Battle of Brier Creek, Georgia. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434670] Daniel Battle.

    One of America's bloodiest Revolutionary War Battlefields remained lost and poorly understood until recently. The use of LiDAR mapping and terrain analysis, metal detection, and cadaver dogs, characteristics of a complicated battlefield environ revealed themselves. The Battle of Brier Creek, Screven County, Georgia was the first open land engagement of the British Southern Winter Campaign of 1778-1779. It was also the first Patriot offensive in the South against an overwhelming British force...

  • Analysis Of Amidships On The Emanuel Point II Shipwreck (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435396] Charles D Bendig.

    Over the past four years University of West Florida archaeologists have excavated the amidships area of the Emanuel Point II (EP II) shipwreck, which was once part of the ill-fated 1559 Spanish colonizing expedition led by Tristán de Luna y Arellano. During excavation, staff and students were able to uncover and record the mainmast step and location for two bilge pumps. Archaeologists also recorded and systematically removed over 30 disarticulated timbers related to the pump well enclosure....

  • Analysis of Mollusks from the Slave Village at Betty’s Hope, Antigua, British West Indies (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434804] Alexis K Ohman.

    Since 2007, excavations at Betty’s Hope plantation have yielded a large amount of faunal material from a variety of contexts on the site: the Great House, Service Quarters, Rum Distillery, and Slave Village. The faunal analysis has begun for the Great House and Service Quarters contexts by focusing on the fish and mollusks in order to ascertain the roles of local vs. nonlocal/imported resources and their incorporation into English foodways at Betty’s Hope. Excavations in the Slave Village began...

  • Anatomy of a 16th-century Spanish galleon: The evolution of the hull design (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435416] Jose L Casaban.

    During the 16th century, the evolution of the Spanish galleon as an oceangoing warship followed a different pattern than in other European nations. The galleon was the product of a maritime tradition developed in Spain that combined Mediterranean and Atlantic design and construction methods. It was designed to protect the fleets of the Indies run, the first permanent interoceanic system from Europe to America, and to defend the Spanish territories overseas and the Iberian Peninsula. This paper...

  • Anchors Through History: The Case of Lagos, Portugal. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434705] Joana Isabel Palma Baço.

    Historical archaeology research has proven that Lagos bay was a mercantile hub for more than two millennia, with maritime traffic reaching as far as Northern Europe, Mediterranean, Northern Africa, and Egypt. Fishing activity in the bay, is even more ancient than maritime traffic. Our study has located and research a large collection of anchors related to this maritime activity in Lagos. We intend to present a series of typologies, including previously unknown examples and show how these...

  • Application of Alternative Light Source to Identify Painted Markings on a Model 1917 Renault French Tank (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435363] Douglas Scott.

    A very large battle damaged artifact, a M1917 French Renault tank, at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Missouri was subjected to analysis with an ALS (altenative light source) in order to identify and bring out faded painted markings. The ALS aided in identifying the tank as a vehicle assigned to the First French Tank Regiment. Work witht the ALS also helped more clearly identify the tank maintenance crew as Americans mechanic trainees who scratched their names on the inside of...

  • Archaeological Considerations In The Study Of The Anthropocene (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434708] James Gibb. Sarah N. Janesko.

    The Anthropocene epoch, garnering the interest of geologists and environmental scientists for the past decade, has now entered the archaeological lexicon. As in other disciplines, questions remain about what Anthropocene means and when it began, as well as how it differs from the Holocene. This presentation explores some of these issues and offers a ground-up approach by which conventional approaches in archaeology might be adapted to a reassessment of the human experience and the role of...

  • An Archaeological Exploration of St. Joseph’s College, the First Catholic Boarding School for Boys within the Oregon Territory (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434682] Cayla L. Hill.

    St. Joseph’s College was located within St. Paul, Oregon, the first Roman Catholic mission in the Pacific Northwest. It was established in 1839 by Father Francois Blanchet, four years after the French-Canadian settlers in the area had requested the presence of a Catholic priest. On October 17, 1843, St. Joseph’s College was officially dedicated, becoming the first Catholic boarding school for boys within the Oregon Territory. The school eventually closed in June 1849 due to the mass exodus of...

  • The Archaeological Potential Of The Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434668] Russell K. Skowronek. Rolando Garza.

    In 2015 the "Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail" (www.utpa.edu/civilwar-trail ) opened in South Texas. Spearheaded by the Community Historical Archaeology Project with Schools (CHAPS) Program of the University of Texas- Rio Grande Valley with federal, state and local partners it is the only trail in Texas dedicated to the era of the American Civil War.  The trail connects Brownsville on the Gulf of Mexico with Laredo some 200 miles up the Rio Grande.  It includes battlefields, forts, and historic...

  • Archaeology and Offshore Development: Advancing our Archaeological Understanding through Collaboration with Industry (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435401] Louise Tizzard.

    The last 15 years have seen a massive increase in offshore development around the UK which has provided archaeologists the opportunity to find and examine new sites from areas of seafloor, in deeper waters and further from the coastline than was previously possible.   In particular, collaboration between archaeologists, geologists, engineers and other stakeholders has significantly advanced our understanding of preservation of inundated palaeolandscapes over large areas, and the potential for...

  • Archaeology at Paoli Battlefield: Expanding the Interpretations of Conflict (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434675] Matthew A. Kalos.

    On evening of September 20, 1777, and into the morning hours of September 21, British Major General Charles Gray led an elite force of British soldiers on a nighttime bayonet raid on American General Anthony Wayne’s encamped troops. The bloody attack enraged the Patriots, and the battle became engrained in American ideology as the Paoli Massacre.  Although the battle was brief, its national and local importance extends for over 225 years.  Today, archaeology at the Paoli Battlefield seeks to...

  • Archaeology in a Revolutionary Town: Multi-Temporal Heritage Narratives at the McGrath Farm, Concord, Massachusetts (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434678] Travis G. Parno. Andrew J. Koh. Sarah Schofield-Mansur.

    The town of Concord, Massachusetts played a critical role in the American Revolutionary War and will forever be linked to this momentous military conflict. While this connection is understandable, Concord has a rich history of indigenous, European, and American life dating back thousands of years. The McGrath Farm site is an excellent example of this complicated and storied past. Once a portion of a farm owned by prominent Revolutionary War figure Col. James Barrett, the McGrath Farm reflects...

  • Archaeology in San Antonio: An Auspicious Paradigm for the Protection of Cultural Resources (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434771] Matthew T. Elverson.

    The City of San Antonio’s Unified Development Code (UDC) contains some of the strongest preservation ordinances in the country for the protection of archaeological resources. In accordance with the UDC, the Office of Historic Preservation (OHP) conducts an archaeological review of new development in the city, specifically within one of the city’s 27 local historic districts, locally designated landmark properties, public property, within the river improvement overlay district. Private...

  • The archaeology of a Seattle city block from 1880s squatters, Great Northern Railroad workers, and the establishment of Pike Place Market. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435386] Alicia Valentino.

    An inconspicuous city block near today’s Pike Place Market held the remains of a 19th century shantytown, evicted in 1902 to prepare for the Great Northern Railroad tunnel beneath Seattle. Construction monitoring of a modern development yielded the remnants of middens and privies dating as early as the 1880s. Spared from the city’s major regrade projects, photographs, maps, and artifacts demonstrate that this parcel was once part of the dense carpet of "squatter’s cabins" covering the city’s...

  • The Archaeology of an Early Resource-Extraction Industry: The Cod Fishery, 1600-1713 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434653] Arthur R Clausnitzer Jr.

    As much as popular histories overlook it, the cod fishery of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries brought the first significant numbers of Europeans to North American shores and provided the earliest colonists in the northeast with an economic foundation from which to build new societies. As an industry which was an important staple for two regions the cod fisheries deserve careful study, but it has only been in the last decades that archaeologists and historians have undertaken critical...

  • The Archaeology of Cowboy Island: The Santa Rosa Historic Archaeology Project (SRHAP) (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434779] Courtney H. Buchanan. Amber M Madrid. Brittany N Lucero. Michael McGurk. Jennifer E Perry.

    This paper presents the findings from the first year of a new historic archaeology research project on Santa Rosa Island, one of the five islands of Channel Islands National Park off the coast of southern California. A new, multi-year project dedicated to recording the extant historic structures and sites related to the 19th- and 20th-century ranching complex was started in 2014, instigated by the recent opening of the Santa Rosa Island Research Station. Since May 2014, four CSU Channel Islands...

  • The Archaeology of Enslaved Labor: Identifying Work and Domestic Spaces in the South Yard (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434717] Terry Brock.

    While the domestic lives of enslaved families and communities are a critical element of understanding enslaved life, the majority of each day was spent carrying out work for their masters. Recent excavations at Montpelier have begun to examine structures related to the work of James Madison's domestic slaves. These excavations include work on the extant kitchen and two smokehouses, buildings clearly designed for the support of the Montpelier Mansion. However, the proximity of these structures to...

  • An Archaeology of Homeplace at the Parting Ways, an African-American Settlement in Plymouth, Massachusetts (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434660] Karen A Hutchins.

    The paper will explore how the African-American residents of a late 18th- and 19th-century community called Parting Ways in Plymouth, Massachusetts constructed a homeplace in the years following their emancipation from slavery. Beyond their importance to household productivity, daily practices—for example, cooking, eating meals, taking tea, and household chores—constituted social interactions and exchanges between individuals that fostered a sense of security and strengthened the bonds of...

  • Archaeology of Pierre Metoyer’s 18th-Century French Colonial Plantation Site, Natchitoches, Louisiana (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434788] Clete Rooney. David Morgan. Kevin C. MacDonald.

    This paper discusses recent findings and interpretations at the 18th century plantation of Pierre Metoyer, a prominent resident of French colonial Louisiana. Metoyer is historically best known for his relationship with Marie-Thérèse Coincoin, a freed slave of African descent living in the Natchitoches area in the 1700s and one of the most important founding ancestors of the regional Creole community. Since 2011 the National Park Service’s Southeast Archeological Center (SEAC) has been assisting...

  • Archaeology of repression and resistance during Francoist dictatorship (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435502] Xurxo Ayán. Carlos Tejerizo. Josu Santamarina. José Señorán.

    Structural and physical violence are common instruments used by dictatorial regimes in order to impose their hegemony and to gain legitimacy within local communities. At the same time, repression usually entails resistance from individuals and societies, which may be active or passive, physic or ideological. Both repression and resistance are materialized in landscapes and objects which can be analysed through Archaeology, telling stories not visible by other means. In this paper, we will...

  • Archaeology, Education, and Gentrification: The View From San Francisco (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435440] Kim Christensen.

    San Francisco, and the Bay Area more broadly, is currently an epicenter of gentrification due largely to the tech economy.  Higher education is implicated in these processes too, though, as universities expand due to increased enrollment pressures.  This paper explores how these intersecting issues have played out during the first semester of teaching "Introduction to Archaeology" for the UC Berkeley/UC Extension San Francisco Fall Program for Freshmen as part of the American Cultures Engaged...

  • The ArcheoBlitz and Citizen Science at Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site, North Dakota. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435441] Jay Sturdevant. Dawn Bringelson.

    As part of the NPS centennial celebration, Knife River Indian Villages NHS and the Midwest Archeological Center hosted a citizen-science event focused on engaging local area Middle School students. The ArcheoBlitz was designed as a multi-day event to highlight research activities focused on the history and resources preserved at the park. The event was loosely modeled on Bio-Blitz events that have successfully been used by the NPS and National Geographic Society to gather natural resources...

  • Archival Digitization and Accessibility in a Small Island Nation: A Case Study (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435366] Kelley ScudderTemple. Michael Pateman.

    Archaeologists, anthropologists, researchers and educators are all aware of crucial role that archival documents play in the discovery process. Those who work in the Caribbean are painfully aware of the absence of accessible archived documents in many island nations.  During the summer of 2016, through a grant with the British Library Endangered Archives Program (EAP914), the Zemi Foundation began working with the Turks and Caicos National Museum on the development of a National Archives. A...

  • Arctic Steam: HMS Pioneer and the Technology of the Search for Franklin (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434746] Mara A Deckinga.

    In mid-nineteenth century Britain, the dramatic disappearance of Sir John Franklin and his men led to a large-scale search conducted throughout the Arctic by sailing ships and steamers.  The rescue expeditions, conducted over a twelve-year span, highlight the shift from reliance on sail to the prevalence of steam during this period.  HMS Pioneer (formerly the merchant Eider), was built as a topsail schooner with oscillating steam engine, and later outfitted as part of an Arctic squadron.  The...

  • Are ROVs The New VIP?: Developing A Supplemental Method For Recording Shipwrecks (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435445] Katherine L Clevenger.

    This paper highlights the benefits of utilizing low-cost remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to photograph and record video footage of several shipwrecks in the Great Lakes. Using such methods, data can be used to create photogrammetric models and orthomosaics of wreck sites, which can then facilitate the creation of scaled, two-dimensional digital site plans. In comparing digital site plans to those produced using traditional mapping techniques, it is possible to determine the accuracy of the...

  • Artifact Revelations on the Guthrie Homestead (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434793] Clare M Votaw. Brianna Patterson.

    The Guthrie family first came to America from Ireland around 1720 and settled in St. Charles County, Missouri in 1816. The family owned many acres of land, which they passed down through the generations.  Archaeological work on the Guthrie Farmstead commenced due to impending impact on the property for housing development. A cultural resource management company conducted thorough and extensive work on the farmstead, which revealed a homestead site (23SC1041) on the property. The site was a...

  • The Ash Grove Meaathouse: Public Archaeology and Preservation at a Fairfax Family Property (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434813] Christopher Sperling.

    The Fairfaxx County (Virginia) Park Authority mission statement specifies the, "…protection and enhancement of…, cultural heritage to guarantee that these resources will be available to both present and future generations." When staff preservationists identified the need to stabilize a historic meathouselocated at an eighteenth century house site built by a member of the county’s namesake family, it presented the opportunity to demonstrate commitment to this mission.  In order to stabilize the...

  • Asking New Questions of Old Collections, The Future of Curated Assemblages. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434809] LisaMarie Malischke.

    Part of the future of Historical Archaeology is the re-examination of existing collections by applying new research questions. An example of this is Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729), where a productive fourth year of excavations in the 1970s went unpublished. In re-examining the whole artifact assemblage with its associated architectural features, I gathered new information regarding daily life at the fort. Using an ethnohistorical approach I constructed the political situation that surrounded the...

  • Assessing the Damage and Remaining Archeological Potential of Commercially Salvaged Sites Mozambique Island: the case of São Sebastião fortress wrecks. (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435505] Cézar Sebastião Mahumane.

    Following discovery of sea route around the Cape by Vasco da Gama in 1498 that opened the maritime trade between Europe and India, Mozambique Island-which served as capital of Portuguese East Africa from 1507 to 1898-came to play an important role in mediating the maritime interactions that subsequently emerged. The Island’s underwater archaeological heritage that results from this history has been heavily impacted over the last decade by commercial salvage activity as assessed in 2015 by the...

  • B-24 Liberator Aircraft: Survey Results and Partnerships for Upcoming Recovery Project (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435488] Megan Lickliter-Mundon.

    In 1944, factory workers and community members from Tulsa, OK financed the last B-24 Liberator built by the Tulsa Douglas Aircraft plant. They named her Tulsamerican, signed and wrote messages on her fuselage, and sent her to Europe with a part Tulsa crew. She crashed off the coast of Croatia after a bombing mission but was never forgotten as a WWII community icon. After imaging and preservation surveys in 2014 and 2015, researchers are now preparing for the recovery of remains and personal...

  • Balancing with Guns: Establishing an Integrated Conservation Priority for Artillery from Site 31CR314, Queen Anne’s Revenge (1718) (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434712] Erik R Farrell.

    Among the artifacts from the wreck of Queen Anne’s Revenge (QAR), the artillery represents a particularly evocative and informative subset. Conserving a cannon protects the object, reveals archaeological information, and allows for impressive museum displays for public education. However, the conservation of an individual cannon represents one of the largest single-object expenditures of time and materials of any subset of QAR artifacts. These expenditures must be prioritized within the ongoing...

  • Between the Mythic and the Material: Texas Exceptionalism and Early Austin History (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435431] Noel Harris.

    Popular histories portray the Republic of Texas capital city of Austin between 1839 and 1846 as a crude frontier town, characterized by Anglo-American heroism and material deprivation. By stressing these aspects of Republic-era life, such histories omit many facets of early Austin’s social history, including enslaved forced migration and individualism that diverge from this narrative. This research carefully examines extant objects, architecture, and primary source documents to suggest an...

  • Beyond the Walls: An Examination of Michilimackinac's Extramural Settlement (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434737] James C Dunnigan.

    Since 1959 the continuous archaeological investigations at Fort Michilimackinac have shaped our understanding of colonial life in the Great Lakes. The fort served as the center of a vast, multicultural trade network. While the Fort’s interior continues to be vigorously excavated, little attention has been given to the larger village that emerged outside the Fort’s walls in the latter half of the eighteenth century. Summer excavations from 1970-1973, conducted by Lyle Stone, attempted to explore...

  • Black and White and Red All Over: The Goodrich Steamer Atlanta, 1891-1906 (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435421] Lauren M Christian. Victoria L Kiefer.

    Often overlooked in the story of the westward settlement of America, transportation of passengers and cargo through the Great Lakes and northern river systems accounted for a substantial volume of migrant travel. From the mid-1800s through the 1930s, passenger steamers on the Great Lakes were designed to combine luxury and speed. The Goodrich Transit Company, for example, was one of the longest operating (1856-1933) and most successful passenger steamship lines on the Great Lakes. Passage on the...

  • Blackbeard's Beads: An Analysis And Comparison of Glass Trade Beads From The Shipwreck 31CR314 (BUI0003) Queen Anne's Revenge Site Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435451] Kimberly Urban.

    In 1717, the French slaver La Concorde de Nantes was captured by pirates and renamed the Queen Anne’s Revenge (QAR). It is believed that the pirates removed the enslaved Africans before taking the ship. However, some scholars believe the pirates sold the slaves in North Carolina. One marker of a ships involvement in the slave trade are beads. Physical examination of beads is used to determine the date and country of manufacture and used to correlate a ships involvement in the trade. Thus far,...

  • Blacksmithing for Fun and Profit: Archaeological Investigations at 31NH755 (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435379] Natalie Pope. Tracy A. Martin. William G. Green.

    Archaeological investigations at an early 19th century historic site along the banks of the Lower Cape Fear River near Wilmington, North Carolina, uncovered evidence of a small blacksmith shop and adjacent domestic occupation.  Archaeological features included the footprint of the burned blacksmith shop, approximately 15 by 15 feet in size, along with a dense scatter of charcoal, slag, and scrap iron.  Adjacent to this building were structural posts and artifacts that appear to be related to a...

  • Bricks on Black Water: Excavations and Public Education at an 1830s Gulf Coast Brickyard (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435433] Jess Hendrix.

    In the mid-1820s the newly acquired American port town of Pensacola began to develop a huge military complex. Resulting from the demand for brick needed in the construction of a number of third-system masonry coastal forts and a Naval Yard, Pensacola developed a substantial brick industry almost overnight. Today, little remains of the many brickyards that supplied millions of bricks for forts located from New Orleans to the Dry Tortugas off the coast of Key West, Florida. Over the last several...

  • Building a New Ontology for Historical Archaeology Using the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434751] Robert DeMuth. Kelsey Noack Myers. Joshua J Wells. Stephen Yerka. David Anderson. Eric Kansa. Sarah W. Kansa.

    Unlike prehistoric archaeology, there is no general unified system by which historical archaeological sites are classified. This problem, which is in part due to recognized biases in the recording of historic archaeological sites, has resulted in numerous incompatible systems by which various states classify historic sites. This study demonstrates a first step toward providing historical archaeologists with the means of creating a more cohesive ontology for historic site reporting. The advent of...

  • Bunker Hill Farm, Camp Michaux: From Farmhouse to Bathhouse (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434743] Victoria A Cacchione. Maria Bruno.

     Isolated in a single location in central Pennsylvania within Michaux State Forrest rest the remnants of an Early Republic farmstead, a Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp, a Prisoner of War (POW) Interrogation Center from World War Two (WWII), and a Church camp. The one common factor throughout each of these disparate time periods is the farmhouse built circa 1788. This wooden structure stood until the 1970s when the Church camp ended. Now only the stone foundation remains along with...

  • Buttoning Up at the Biry House A Study of Clothing Fasteners of a Descendant Alsatian Household (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434707] Maxwell Forton.

    Excavations at the Biry house of Castroville, Texas yielded a large assemblage of buttons, which may be studied to yield a better understanding of the lives of Alsatian immigrants within the community. Buttons represent a class of material objects that are simultaneously intimate and utilitarian in nature. While buttons are used on a daily basis, we remain largely aloof to these small, discrete fasteners in our lives. This paper represents an exercise in discerning the information that buttons...

  • C. J. Young Artist: Archaeology of Civil War Photography and Stencil Cutting at Camp Nelson, Kentucky (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435514] W. Stephen McBride.

    Recent excavations at Camp Nelson Civil War Park, KY have focused on the William Berkele Sutler store, which was part of the camp’s commercial district. While excavating north of the Berkele Store, we unexpectedly found evidence of a photograph gallery which included a stencil cutting operation.  Both of these products were in demand for Civil War soldiers, the former to send portraits of themselves back to loved ones, perhaps for the last time, and the latter to mark and claim personal...

  • Camp of the 6th New York Volunteer Infantry and the Battle of Santa Rosa Island, Florida (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435452] William B. Lees.

    In October of 1861 the camp of the 6th New York Volunteer Infantry was surprised and routed and the Battle of Santa Rosa Island ensued. Confederates destroyed the camp before being pushed off the island by regulars from nearby Fort Pickens. Research at the site was kicked off by an RPA-certified Advanced Metal Detecting for the Archaeologist training hosted by the University of West Florida, Florida Public Archaeology Network. Results expanded on the understanding of the site developed after the...

  • Can Economic Concepts Be Used To More Effectively Raise Awareness And Value Of Underwater Cultural Heritage? (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434792] Chris Underwood.

    During the past twenty years, the UK among other countries has undergone a period of urban and social regeneration. As part of this process maritime environments including historic ships have been integrated into harbour and coastal redevelopments, with tourism and social wellbeing considered key components. But, has underwater cultural heritage (UCH) formed a part? The most obvious is the Mary Rose along with smaller collections housed in larger institutions. Acknowledging that innovative...

  • Can't See the Forest for the Trees: The Upland South Folk Cemetery Tradition on United States Army Corps of Engineers Land in Georgia (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435527] Allen Wilson. Michael P. Fedoroff.

    The nature of the mission of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers--water management, and the dams and reservoirs necessary to accomplish this mission have resulted in many familial and community cemeteries on USACE land falling under the stewardship of the Corps. The desire to settle near productive bodies of water, the time period around which these areas were being settled, and the preference to establish these cemeteries on high grounds resulted in numerous examples of the "Upland South Folk...

  • Capitalism, Hobos, and the Gilded Age: An Archaeology of Communitization in the Inbetween (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435485] Justin E. Uehlein.

    The years following the Civil War and leading up to the Great Depression are largely left out of archaeological discourse. Whether as a result of perceived temporal insignificance (it’s not old enough!), or the assumed ephemerality of such assemblages, peoples dispossessed of their homes as a result of the greatest crisis in modern capitalism have been forgotten in mainstream discourse and effectively ignored by archaeologists. A focus on capitalism within historical archaeology supports this...

  • Carpeted with Ammunition: Investigations of the Florence D shipwreck site, Northern Territory, Australia (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435530] Jason, T. Raupp. David Steinberg.

    The American transport ship Florence D disappeared in the murky waters off of the Tiwi Islands after being bombed by Japanese fighter planes on their return from the first air attack on Darwin Harbour on 19 February 1942. Considered one Australia’s great wartime mysteries, the location of the site was unknown until discovered by a local fisherman in 2006. Archaeological investigations of the wreck later conducted by teams from the Northern Territory’s Heritage Branch verified the identity of the...

  • A Case for STP Survey on Carribean Plantations: Stewart Castle, Jamaica (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435486] Sean Devlin. Lynsey A. Bates. Jillian Galle.

    In this paper, we argue that site survey, prior to and in addition to open area excavation, is essential to addressing our understanding of the contested landscapes of plantation life. Building on a research strategy employed by DAACS on former British Caribbean plantations, preliminary results from 2016 fieldwork at the eighteenth-century Jamaican sugar estate of Stewart Castle suggest the methodological power and analytical opportunities of systematic shovel-test-pit (STP) survey. This...

  • Casualties, Corrosion, and Climate Change: USS Arizona and Potentially Polluting Shipwrecks (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435482] Jeneva Wright.

    USS Arizona, a steel-hulled battleship sunk in Pearl Harbor, HI on 7 December 1941, is an iconic American shipwreck, a war grave and memorial, and is among many shipwreck sites that contain large amounts of potential marine pollutants. Unlike most similar sites, however, USS Arizona has been the subject of long-term and ongoing corrosion studies aimed at understanding and modeling the nature of structural changes to the hull. Gaining a detailed understanding of the interaction between the marine...

  • Cemetery Vandalism: The Selective Manipulation Of Information (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435492] Melissa Eiring.

    Few universal protocols are in place for cemetery preservation and its associated records. Typically, vandalism is associated with physical objects. Often overlooked are the written records. Despite the potential wealth of information, there is currently no guarantee that the record keeping of a cemetery or individual gravemarkers exists or is accurate. The selective disclosure of information or manipulation of records-or documentary vandalism- can lead to vandalized historical records and...

  • Champagne and Angostura Bitters: Entertaining at a Galapagos Sugar Plantation, 1880-1904 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434806] Ross W. Jamieson. Fernando Astudillo. Florencio Delgado. Peter Stahl.

    From 1880 to 1904 Manuel J. Cobos ran the El Progreso Plantation in the highlands of San Cristóbal in the Galapagos Islands.  This operation focused on sugar, cattle, coffee, and fruit production, exploiting the labour of convicted prisoners and indentured peons from mainland Ecuador.  Excavation of the household midden in 2014 and 2015 demonstrates that Cobos imported a variety of goods that tied this remote location in Pacific South America to a global supply chain of luxury consumer products...

  • Chinatown 1868 to 1920: Rock Springs, Wyoming (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435371] A.Dudley Gardner.

    The Chinese settlement in this nineteenth century southwestern Wyoming coal mining town has unique elements.  On September 2, 1885, when Chinatown was attacked and burned to the ground.  This attack was devastating but by 1885 the Chinese immigrant population that lived in Rock Springs had developed a well-ordered, sophisticated interaction sphere that extended to most mining and railroad communities in southern Wyoming.  This presentation looks at how the archaeological evidence from Chinatown...

  • A Chinese Camp in Nevada’s Cortez Mountains (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435385] Robert W. McQueen.

    Recorded in 1994 and excavated in 2009, site 26LA3061 is a late-19th century Chinese workmen’s camp located in the heart of central Nevada’s Cortez Mining District. The site had multiple habitations including dugouts, tent flats, and stone ruins, which yielded several interesting finds—the 6,000+ artifacts included domestic and foreign coins, lots of opium paraphernalia, and a lock of hair that underwent DNA testing. Cortez was infamous for its successful hiring of a large force of Chinese...

  • A Chinese Coin and Flaked Glass: The Unrecorded History of Smith Cove (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434740] Alicia Valentino.

    In the tide flats of Smith Cove was one of Seattle’s small shantytowns, occupied between 1911 and 1941. In 2014, construction monitoring uncovered the remnants of this community, and with it, materials representing an itinerant, low-income, multi-cultural population. The artifacts indicate the presence of Native Americans, Japanese, Chinese, and Euro-Americans, and demonstrate how Smith Cove functioned as a multi-cultural nexus of traditional practices within a modern industrialized urban...

  • A Civil War Battlefield: Conflict Archaeology at Natural Bridge, Florida (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434818] Janene W Johnston.

    The Civil War Battle of Natural Bridge was fought within miles of Tallahassee, Florida, in March of 1865. Much of the site is now the Natural Bridge Battlefield Historic State Park and a metal detector survey was conducted of previously unsurveyed portions of the state-owned land, supplementing work previously done. KOCOA analysis and the survey results provides a new landscape-based interpretation of the placement of the battle events, which will be utilized in future interpretation of this...

  • Clandestine, Ephemeral, Anonymous? Myths and Actualities of the Intimate Economy of a 19th-Century Boston Brothel (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435547] Jade W Luiz.

    Although prostitution was illegal in 19th-century Boston, it was not carried out in secret, nor did it produce so ephemeral a trace as to render it invisible in the historical and archaeological record. Study of material remains from the 27/29 Endicott Street brothel demonstrates the multi-layered realities of brothel life as the residents of the brothel developed strategies for coping with being purchased for ostensibly intimate acts that were in fact commercial transactions. These strategies...

  • Closing the Loop: The Civil War Battle of Honey Springs, Creek Nation, 1863 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434729] William B. Lees.

    The Oklahoma Historical Society conducted metal detector survey of the Civil War Battle of Honey Springs, Creek Nation (Oklahoma) in the 1990s. A variety of papers between 1995 and 2002 reported on different aspects of this research, but I present a comprehensive archaeological treatment of the battle here for the first time. Results show the battle to have been a series of three engagements over several miles, with a distinctly different signature at each of the three conflict locations. This...

  • Clusters of Beads: Testing for Time on the Carolina Frontier c.1680-1734 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434759] Sarah Stroud Clarke. Jon Marcoux.

    When analyzing archaeological sites with almost continual episodes of occupation, it is often difficult to discern distinct temporal periods; given this challenge archaeologists have long relied on a variety of methodological techniques to help narrow down dates of occupation. In 2012, Jon Marcoux published a new correspondence analysis study using over 35,000 glass trade beads in Native American mortuary contexts dated c.1607-1783 with the results indicating four discrete clusters of time. This...

  • Collaborating with Carpenters: Historic House Care and Archaeology at Strawbery Banke Museum (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435515] Alexandra Martin. Ana C. Opishinski.

    Strawbery Banke Museum is an outdoor history museum in Portsmouth, NH with over 40 historic houses.  The majority of these buildings sit on their original foundations, enabling archaeological research into the daily lives of the historic neighborhood’s residents.  Recently, the primary motivation for museum excavations has been in preparation for construction work planned by the museum’s Heritage House Program.  This presentation will describe how the archaeology department works in...

  • "Comfort and Satisfaction to All": Excavation of a Nineteenth-Century Coffee House (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435479] Michael J. Meyer.

    In 2015, the Missouri Department of Transportation investigated a mid-nineteenth century property formerly known as the Racine House. From 1850 until 1872, the house operated as a coffee shop, saloon, boarding house, hotel, and general gathering place for working class men. Catering almost exclusively to French-Canadian immigrants, the Racine House was one of many such "social clubs" in this heavily-Germanic neighborhood. Recent archeological excavations uncovered a pair of features located...

  • Commodity Culture: the formation, exchange, and negotiation of Early Republican Period identity on a periphery of the Spanish Empire in Western El Salvador (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435364] Lauren Alston Bridges.

    During the Early Republican Period, the sugar industry increasingly connected a fledgling Salvadoran country to a global market. A creolized labor force produced sugar on large estates known as haciendas. The hacienda was a crossroads of indigenous, African, and European interests as evidenced in the ceramic landscapes of the Río Ceniza Valley. The extensive organization of labor, on a periphery of the Spanish Empire, was underscored by a complex set of power relations. This research focuses on...

  • Community Networks at the Stanford Arboretum Chinese Workers’ Quarters (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434752] Christopher Lowman.

    The historical response and endurance of Chinese diaspora communities in California, living with legally reified racism, is a critical component of understanding the economic and social impacts of immigration restriction. Between 1876 and 1925, the Chinese employees at the Stanford Stock Farm and Stanford University impacted the development of agriculture and infrastructure through their labor and entrepreneurship as farm workers, in construction, as gardeners, and as domestic workers. Over that...

  • The Community of Chase Home: Institutional and Material Components of Children’s Lived Spaces in Victorian Portsmouth (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434744] Katherine Evans.

    The Chase Home for Children opened in 1883, housed in an immigrant-rich neighborhood of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The Home accepted children, "without distinction of race, creed, or color*" who needed temporary or long-term care and housing. Chase Home was guided by tenants of the Progressive Era and supported solely by the local community, at a time before state welfare was available. In contrast to single religious denomination orphanages typical in Victorian America, or strict reformatory...

  • Comparative Analysis Of Waterscreening Soil From A French Colonial Living Floor In St. Charles, Missouri (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434722] Steve Dasovich.

    Excavations collected approximately 14.4 cubic meters of a hard-packed living floor from a Fremch Colonial outbuilding for waterscreening (from 23SC2101).  This paper will discuss the partial analysis of the materials and information recovered from this mass soil collection process and draw broad conclusions about the efforts usefullness.  

  • Comparative Archaeological Analysis of Ship Rigging During the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434658] Grace Tsai.

    The first two decades of the seventeenth century saw a period of rapid technological advancement in shipbuilding, including ships’ rigging. This paper analyzes the changes in rigging seen in artifacts excavated from wrecks spanning from AD 1545 to 1700. Compiled from the most recent publications and/or personal correspondences, the list of artifacts include: blocks, sheaves, pins, deadeyes, chainplates, parrels, cordage, sails, and other miscellaneous parts. These remains will be analyzed to...

  • A Comparative Examination of the Dietary Practices of British and French Occupants of New France. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434819] Kristen A Walczesky.

    The examination of faunal remains from archaeological sites provides a wealth of information pertaining to the diets of past peoples and comparative analyses allow for an in-depth understanding of similarities and differences that occur amongst sites. This research focuses on the comparative analysis of faunal data from a variety of sites located in and around Québec City. Data from a privy associated with the French (1720s-1760) and English (1760-1775) occupations of the second Intendant’s...

  • Concealed Clothing or Cold Climate? The Discovery of 103 Articles of Historic Clothing in an Iron-Worker’s Cottage (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435541] Elizabeth A. Comer. Kathy Abbott.

    During restoration of a ca.1817 worker’s house in Catoctin Furnace, Maryland, 103 articles of clothing were discovered inserted between the eaves. The heavily worn and patched clothing for men, women and children includes both current fashion and utilitarian articles. An extraordinary discovery in its own right, the dataset is augmented by the recovery of over 200 buttons, as well as pins, needles, and shoes from excavation beneath the floorboards of the house. This paper shares research on the...

  • Conducting an Archaeological Survey Across a Country: the Trials and Triumphs of the Nicaragua Canal Archaeological Baseline Project (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434789] Emlen Myers. Christopher Polglase. Benjamin D. Siegel. Manuel Roman. Douglas Park.

    In 2014, ERM undertook an archaeological baseline survey for the Canal de Nicaragua project as part of an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment. Intended to assess the entire canal route, the area examined included a 10km wide corridor from the Boca de Brito on the Pacific coast to the mouth of the Punta Gorda on the Caribbean coast (a 1,400km² impact area). This paper presents ERM’s Nicaragua project as a case study of a high level CRM effort operating within a politically charged medium...

  • Confronting Uncomfortable Pasts: Gender and Domestic Violence in Pennsylvania Company Towns, 1850 to Present (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434706] V. Camille Westmont. Mikaela Girard.

    Historical archaeology has an opportunity to tell histories that have been obscured, overlooked, or forgotten, purposefully or otherwise, through the passage of time; however, some of these facets of the past continue to ring true in the present. Archaeologists from the University of Maryland have documented patterns and stories of domestic violence in small company "patch" towns in Northeastern Pennsylvania’s Anthracite coal region covering nearly 100 years of history. Oral histories with town...

  • Consuming the French New World (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435427] Elizabeth M Scott.

    All of France’s New World colonies were based on relationships with particular geographies, according to the products and resources wanted by the Crown, which may be thought of as the ultimate "consumer" of French colonial landscapes.  Colonists and French descendant communities engaged with these different landscapes for both commercial and family subsistence purposes.  Obtaining, producing, and moving such resources as furs, wheat and flour, hams, bear oil, salt, and sugar required a variety...

  • Convicts, Cargo, and Calamity: The Wreck of the Enchantress (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434815] Abigail E. Casavant.

    From 2010-2015, the University of Rhode Island and St. Mary’s College of California conducted an underwater archaeology field school in the waters of Bermuda on a site called the "Iron Plate Wreck." Aptly named for a large block of sheet iron located at the stern, the wreck’s identity remained a mystery for over 50 years. In 2013, however, historical research provided clues to the identity of the wreck, revealing it is the Enchantress, an early 19th century British merchant vessel with a unique...

  • Corrosion Monitoring and Preservation in Situ of Large Iron Artifacts at the Queen Anne’s Revenge Shipwreck site (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434681] Sarah Watkins-Kenney.

    At North Carolina state archaeological site 31CR314 (Queen Anne’s Revenge), the overall conservation management strategy is full excavation and recovery of all artifacts. Preservation and protection of artifacts in situ is, however, needed as long as they remain on site. Research on in situ monitoring and preservation of large iron artifacts (cannon and anchors) began in 2008. With funding provided by a Mini North Carolina Sea Grant further data was collected in 2012-2013 for eight cannon and...

  • Crime and Criminality in 18th Century Virginia (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434810] Jessica L Barry.

    The definition of a criminal has always been "a person who commits a crime," but the definition of a crime has been fluid through time. There are levels of severity of crimes and they all don’t carry the same weight in the justice system or in society. In Colonial Virginia, there were prisons in every county as well as a courthouse where the trials were held. This small conglomeration of buildings were at the heart of the county seat where the civil and social lives of the citizens flourished....

  • Current Interpretations at the "Cemetery" Site at Old Colchester Park and Preserve (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434756] Erica A. D'Elia.

    The Old Colchester Park and Preserve (OCPP), located in southern Fairfax County along the Occoquan River, was acquired by the Fairfax County Park Authority in 2006. The nearly 145 acres of preserved parkland includes numerous prehistoric and historic sites spanning 10,000 years of human occupation. Prominent among these sites is the colonial tobacco port town of Colchester, ca. 1754-1830. Current excavations are focused on the site immediately adjacent to the cemetery, located about half a mile...

  • The Dardenne Presbyterian Church Archaeological Project (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434811] Jordan L Schaefer. Judith A Finot.

    This paper examines the archaeological remains of the Dardenne Presbyterian Church in Dardenne Prairie, Missouri. Constructed in 1845, the Church served as a gathering ground for residents of the area for both religious and social purposes. During the course of the Civil War, the Church was encountered by Union soldiers who proceeded to burn it down in 1862. Today, the remains of the church can still be found. Through selective shovel testing and excavation, various building materials have been...

  • THE DECLINE OF THE TRADITIONAL IRON WORKING INDUSTRY IN THE ABUJA AREA OF CENTRAL NIGERIA: THE ROLE OF BRITISH COLONIAL POLICIES. c. 1800-1960 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434755] Abiye E. Ichaba.

    By the beginning of the 19th century iron working played important roles in the economic and socio-cultural ways of the inhabitants of Abuja. The traditionally produced iron tools and implements provided the much needed tools for agriculture, warfare, trade, inter-group relations, control of the environment, and other socio-cultural developments. By c. 1800 A.D., British colonial interests in the area had increased, just like other parts of Nigeria. This paper explores the decline of the...

  • Decolonizing Landscapes: Documenting culturally important areas collaboratively with tribes (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435536] Valerie J Grussing.

    The Characterizing Tribal Cultural Landscapes project outlines a proactive approach to working with indigenous communities to identify tribally significant places, in advance of proposed undertakings. A collaborative effort among BOEM, NOAA, tribal facilitators, and the THPOs of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde in Oregon, Yurok Tribe in California, and Makah Tribe in Washington, we use a holistic cultural landscape approach to model methods and best practices for agencies and tribes to...

  • The Deep History of a Modern Phenomenon: An Archaeological Perspective on Corporate Agriculture in Northwest Ohio (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435437] Robert Chidester. Maura Johnson.

    Yard signs proclaiming, "Family Farms Not Factory Farms!" are a common site along rural highways in the Midwest. These signs are a direct response to the tremendous growth of corporate agriculture during the second half of the 20th century and the concomitant decline of the traditional farming model in which a single family owns and operates a productive, commercial farm. While most lay people likely assume that "factory farms" are a fairly recent economic phenomenon, in reality land...

  • Deepwater Shipwrecks and Oil Spill Impacts: An Innovative Multiscalar Approach from Microbial Ecology to 3D Scanning Systems (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435463] Melanie Damour. Leila Hamdan. Jennifer Salerno. Robert Church. Daniel Warren. Christopher Horrell.

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and partners implemented a multidisciplinary study in 2013 to examine impacts from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill on deepwater shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Shipwreck Corrosion, Hydrocarbon Exposure, Microbiology, and Archaeology Project, or GOM-SCHEMA, conducted a comparative analysis to assess micro- to macroscale impacts from the spill by examining microbial community biodiversity, their role in artificial reef formation, and...

  • Dentistry as Social Discourse: Aspects of Oral Health and Consumer Choice using a Bioarchaeological Perspective (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434702] Lisa R. Matthies-Barnes.

    This study examines the presence (or absence) of professional dental restorative work in the form of fillings, crowns, bridges, or even full sets of dentures, using an integrative biocultural approach.  The dataset is derived from an intensive survey of historic cemeteries subjected to bioarchaeological analyses, and include differences in geography (urban versus rural), gender, race/ethnicity, age, and commensurate socioeconomic levels.  Since restorative dental work was both expensive and...

  • A Diamond Trowel: Minecrafting Archaeology at Fort St. Joseph (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434713] James B Schwaderer.

    The development of digital technology is transforming society, including archaeology, in new and ever-expanding ways. From theodolites and GIS to informational databases and ion dating, the technological boom of the twenty-first century has provided new tools that increase the precision and complexity of archaeological analysis. The use of digital media by the average person has exploded, and such technologies provide new and intriguing avenues to reach and educate the public about archaeology....

  • Digital Historic Preservation: Recording and Interpreting the Patterson-Altman’s Mill with 3-D Scanning (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434765] Sarah J La Fevre.

    The purpose of this study is to compare the traditional recording as conducted by the Historic American Engineering Record (HAER) with modern 3-D scanning, focusing on the Patterson-Altman Mill located in Saltsburg, PA. The Patterson-Altman Mill was originally built in 1912 and recorded by HAER in 1987 (HAER No. PA-110), and is currently featured on the Preservation Pennsylvania at Risk 2013/14 and Preservation National 2014 list. This study will use the image data collected from a 3- D Leica...

  • Directions in Deepwater Marine Archaeology: Using Technology to Grow and Synthesize Knowledge on the Deep Frontier. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434758] Eric Swanson. Tiffany Goldhamer. Ray Blackmon.

    The increased use of remote sensing technology has allowed archaeology to go farther and deeper than ever before.  The capability of effecting real-time adaptations to Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) surveys and the increase in resolution of remote sensing equipment has provided scientists with a better opportunity to study and research what lies below the ocean’s surface.  It is with advancing technology that science and engineering has allowed for the better protection and understanding of...

  • Discovering the Blue Ridge Exploradores: Celebrating Thirty Years of Public Engagement at the Berry Site (2017)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435410] Melissa Timo.

    Juan Pardo and his men arrived in western North Carolina 450 years ago hoping to establish an overland route from the capital of Spanish Florida at Santa Elena (Parris Island, SC) to the silver mines of Zacatecas, Mexico. Excavations at one of the Pardo-established forts (known as Fort San Juan, Joara, and the Berry Site) began in 1986. Public engagement has been a key component from the first field season. This paper will discuss the evolving role outreach has played in the continuing...

  • Discovery and future of the lost fleet of the Mongol Empire (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434769] Yoshifumi Ikeda. Randall Sasaki.

    The story of Kamikaze, or the legendary storm that destroyed the ill-fated fleet of Khublai Khan off Japan, is a well known story in history. It is recorded that more than three thousands vessels were lost. The search for the lost fleet took decades while only small hull fragments and scatters of artifacts were found. In 2015, finally a well-preservd vessel was discovered at Takashim Island in Nagasaki Prefecture. Unfortunately, the large majority of Japanese archaeologists had not realize the...

  • Diving In The Desert: A First Look At The Underwater Archaeology Of Walker Lake (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434723] Neil N Puckett.

    Underwater investigations of drowned terrestrial sites have become increasingly important to the pursuit of New World, prehistoric archaeology. The Atlantic and Gulf Coast shelves, the rivers of Florida, the Pacific Coast, and the Great Lakes have each provided evidence for human occupations in now inundated landscapes. These pursuits have resulted in invaluable information on human behavior, offered excellent preservation of perishable and datable materials, and often presented uniquely buried...

  • Diving into the PAST: Developing a Public Engagement Program for Pensacola’s Emanuel Point Shipwrecks (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434725] Nicole Grinnan. Della A Scott-Ireton.

    Remnants of Spain’s failed attempt to settle modern-day Pensacola in 1559, the Emanuel Point shipwrecks are legacies of Florida’s long colonial history. Community interest in the sites has been profound since the discovery of the Emanuel Point I wreck in 1992, but challenging dive conditions have limited opportunities for public access. After award of a grant to explore Emanuel Point II in 2014, the University of West Florida (UWF) Division of Anthropology and Archaeology began considering new...

  • Diving into the Past: The Corsair at Crystal Cove State Marine Conservation Area (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434733] Tricia Dodds.

    Crystal Cove State Park is home to many unique cultural resources that tell the story of California’s fascinating past. Its marine conservation area is no less extraordinary. In 1949, a Navy F4U Corsair airplane met its watery grave off the coast of Crystal Cove. Since its rediscovery, this underwater site has been studied and recorded by California State Parks with the assistance of other institutions. In 2014, the California State Parks Dive Team revisited the Corsair to evaluate its current...

  • Documenting Subfloor Pits in a Slave Cabin at the Bulow Plantation (1821-1836), Flagler County, Florida (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434694] James Davidson.

    In 2014 and 2015, the University of Florida Historical Archaeological Field School conducted excavations at the Bulow Plantation, a large sugar plantation in East Florida which was founded in 1821 and destroyed in a fire in 1836, during the Second Seminole War.  Our focus was a single domestic slave cabin of frame construction with a coquina stone chimney/fireplace. Excavations revealed a previously unknown architectural detail at the site in the form of a stone lined sub-floor pit feature or...

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