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A Scraper is Sometimes Just a Scraper: A Multi-Method Approach to Inferring Tool Use at an Oneota Site in Southeastern Wisconsin

Author(s): Katherine Sterner-Miller ; Robert Jeske

Year: 2016

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Summary

A sample of lithic artifacts from the Crescent Bay Hunt Club site, a 12th-14th century Oneota village at Lake Koshkonong in southeastern Wisconsin, were subjected to a multiple-method analysis to determine individual tool use. In this example, an assemblage based analysis of raw material type and quality, heat alteration and energy input into manufacturing combined with debitage analysis provides an overall understanding of the lithic economy. Triangular bifaces and unifacial tools from Crescent Bay were then subjected to a combination of micro- and macroscopic identification of edge damage and surface polishes, followed by protein residue analysis to provide four independent lines of evidence that yield strong inferences about tool use. This multi-pronged approach to raw material acquisition, tool manufacturing, tool use, and tool discard provides more comprehensive insights into the role of lithic economy in the daily lives of people than are often derived from Late Prehistoric sites in the Midcontinent.


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Cite this Record

A Scraper is Sometimes Just a Scraper: A Multi-Method Approach to Inferring Tool Use at an Oneota Site in Southeastern Wisconsin. Katherine Sterner-Miller, Robert Jeske. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404545)


Keywords

General
Lithics microwear Oneota

Geographic Keywords
North America - Midwest


Spatial Coverage

min long: -104.634; min lat: 36.739 ; max long: -80.64; max lat: 49.153 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America