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The Age and Distribution of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris ) in Tennessee and the Southeastern U.S.

Author(s): Timothy Baumann ; Gary Crites

Year: 2016

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Summary

Arriving after AD 1000, the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) was the last domesticated plant to be adopted in the prehistoric Eastern Woodlands. Beans were combined with corn and squash to create the "three sisters" agricultural system. Recent scholarship has argued that the earliest beans entered the eastern US from the lower Plains and through the Great Lakes. When and how beans entered into the southeastern U.S. is not clearly understood because very few beans have been directly dated. New radiocarbon dates of beans from Tennessee and neighboring states are presented that may provide new evidence of multiple trade/migration paths.


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Cite this Record

The Age and Distribution of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris ) in Tennessee and the Southeastern U.S.. Timothy Baumann, Gary Crites. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Orlando, Florida. 2016 ( tDAR id: 404947)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -91.274; min lat: 24.847 ; max long: -72.642; max lat: 36.386 ;

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America