tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Hunting with talc? Experiments into the functionality of certain Late Neolithic ground projectile points from the site of Liangchengzhen, Peoples Republic of China

Author(s): Geoffrey Cunnar ; William Schindler ; Anne Underhill ; Fengshi Luan ; Hui Fang

Year: 2009

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Collaborative excavations by the Shandong University and Field Museum at the Longshan Period site of Liangchengzhen in eastern Shandong Province, China have uncovered over 200 projectile points constructed from several prevalent material types of varying hardness. The majority of the points were finished by grinding. The smaller percentage were finished by pressure flaking. Raw materials utilized in projectile point manufacture included chlorite schist, chert and talc schist. To better understand their efficiency as projectile weapons, several of the points were replicated and tested in well controlled penetration experiments. While it is argued that talc schist projectile points could have functioned as weapons, they were also likely highly symbolic tools constructed and used for ceremonial or other non-utilitarian purposes.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Hunting with talc? Experiments into the functionality of certain Late Neolithic ground projectile points from the site of Liangchengzhen, Peoples Republic of China. Geoffrey Cunnar, William Schindler, Anne Underhill, Fengshi Luan, Hui Fang. Ethnoarchaeology. Journal of Archaeological, Ethnographic, and Experimental Studies. 1 (2): 185-212. 2009 ( tDAR id: 423188)


URL: http://lcoastpress.metapress.com/content/m24247q8h326331p/


Keywords

General
bow & arrow Hunting Spear

Geographic Keywords
China


Spatial Coverage

min long: 73.62; min lat: 18.198 ; max long: 134.761; max lat: 53.544 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): EXARC Experimental Archaeology Collection Manager


Record Identifiers

ExArc Id(s): 9978

Notes

Rights & Attribution: The information in this record was originally compiled by Dr. Roeland Paardekooper, EXARC Director.


Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America