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I don't see color, but I see your hijab: How Public Archaeology can Confront Race, Racism, and Islamophobia in Social Science Education

Author(s): Mia Carey

Year: 2017

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Summary

Millennials are hailed as one of the most racially progressive generations in America’s history. African Americans and other people of color are becoming consciously aware of the challenges that they face in navigating America as a minority. White millennials, who describe themselves as being racially progressive, typically lack awareness or understanding of discrimination and racism and use colorblindness as a way of coping with fear and ignorance. Their colorblindness invalidates the identities and experiences of minorities, and equates color with something negative. This leaves white millennials ill-equipped to deal with changing classroom demographics and the knowledge and experiences that minorities bring to the classroom. By embracing a culturally relevant pedagogy aided by archaeology, young, white social science educators can begin to bridge the gap by confronting their own white privileges and inherent biases.


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I don't see color, but I see your hijab: How Public Archaeology can Confront Race, Racism, and Islamophobia in Social Science Education. Mia Carey. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 429285)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -84.067; min lat: 36.031 ; max long: -72.026; max lat: 43.325 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15609

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America