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What can we infer about family plots scatterings in a 19th Century Southern Georgia church grave site.

Author(s): Chuanyu Fu ; L. Meghan Dennis

Year: 2015

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Summary

 Through human history, the deceased have been buried, their bodies or representations placed in a space, most near their familial ties. Graves are not only places of rest but places to revisit the past and sanctuaries of still powerful affections. Why, in a 19th century Northern Georgia church gravesite do family plots of the same name scatter throughout different locations on the site, even within the same time periods? Why were the boundaries of the family plots physically set yet the relations of the same family cover different plots?

This paper will explore the history and characteristics of Carmel Church and its progression into a modern day collection of generations of families and their stories. The graves, their spaces, and their neighboring graves hold many tales that seem "strange" without context.

The graves brings a connection to the present from the past, yet also tell stories of their own origins.


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What can we infer about family plots scatterings in a 19th Century Southern Georgia church grave site.. Chuanyu Fu, L. Meghan Dennis. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434081)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 521

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America