Corrosion Monitoring and Preservation in Situ of Large Iron Artifacts at the Queen Anne’s Revenge Shipwreck site

Author(s): Sarah Watkins-Kenney

Year: 2016

Summary

At North Carolina state archaeological site 31CR314 (Queen Anne’s Revenge), the overall conservation management strategy is full excavation and recovery of all artifacts. Preservation and protection of artifacts in situ is, however, needed as long as they remain on site. Research on in situ monitoring and preservation of large iron artifacts (cannon and anchors) began in 2008. With funding provided by a Mini North Carolina Sea Grant further data was collected in 2012-2013 for eight cannon and one anchor at the site. This paper presents and discusses results for analysis of data collected for large iron artifacts at the site since 2008, including calculation of corrosion rates, and corrosion indicators. Analysis of the data appears to indicate that attachment of sacrificial anodes to cannon and anchors at the QAR site has helped to improve the stability of these corroding artifacts.

Cite this Record

Corrosion Monitoring and Preservation in Situ of Large Iron Artifacts at the Queen Anne’s Revenge Shipwreck site. Sarah Watkins-Kenney. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434681)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
18th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 246