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Changing conceptions of significance, importance, and value—moving beyond the "research exception" in Section 106 archaeology

Author(s): Tom McCulloch

Year: 2016

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Summary

Until the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation revised its regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act in 2000, an undertaking that would destroy all or parts of a National Register listed or eligible archaeological site could be considered to not adversely affect the site if data recovery was carried out beforehand. This in spite of the fact that generally only a small percentage of the site was usually excavated, and the rest subsequently destroyed. This paper discusses why the "research exception" was created, and examines the evolving legal and cultural environment that led to changes in the regulations whereby federal actions that impact archaeological properties, as well as data recovery itself, are deemed to have an adverse effect on the historic property. 


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Changing conceptions of significance, importance, and value—moving beyond the "research exception" in Section 106 archaeology. Tom McCulloch. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435020)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 275

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America