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Race and the water: the materiality of swimming, sewers and segregation in African America

Author(s): Paul R. Mullins ; Timo Ylimaunu

Year: 2017

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Summary

Few dimensions of the color line were monitored as closely as access to American rivers, beaches, and swimming pools, which became strictly segregated in the early 20th century. This paper examines the heritage of color line inequalities in Indianapolis, Indiana's waters, where beaches were segregated, African Americans were restricted to a single city pool, and waterways in African-American neighborhoods still accommodate sewer overflows. Despite that history, a new wave of urbanites is now settling in formerly African-American neighborhoods, displacing historically African-American communities,and reclaiming the waterways without any recognition of the link between race and the water. 


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Cite this Record

Race and the water: the materiality of swimming, sewers and segregation in African America. Paul R. Mullins, Timo Ylimaunu. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Fort Worth, TX. 2017 ( tDAR id: 435154)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
20th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 603

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America