Working To Stay Together In "Foresaken Out Of The Way Places": Examining Anishinaabe Logging Camps And Lumbering Communities As Sites Of Social Refuge In The Industrial Frontier Of Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

Author(s): Eric C. Drake

Year: 2018

Summary

Recent historical analyses of American Indians and wage labor have sought to challenge the "traditional" versus "modernist" dichotomy that has long shaped narratives of Anishinaabe labor history in the Upper Great Lakes.  This paper discusses how collaborative research, involving the archaeological investigation of logging camps and mill sites in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, has aided in challenging the assumptions underlying this narrative form.  More specifically, this paper explores the variegated ways in which members of one Anishinaabe lumbering community engaged the logging industry as a means to resist removal and negotiate the social and economic tensions created by federal assimilation programs and the labor demands of industrial capitalism.

Cite this Record

Working To Stay Together In "Foresaken Out Of The Way Places": Examining Anishinaabe Logging Camps And Lumbering Communities As Sites Of Social Refuge In The Industrial Frontier Of Michigan's Upper Peninsula.. Eric C. Drake. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441775)

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1840 - 1940

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contact(s): Society for Historical Archaeology

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 696