The Role of Synthesis in American Archaeology and Cultural Resource Management as Seen through an Arizona Lens

Author(s): Jeffrey Altschul

Year: 2016

Summary

Since the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act in 1966, American archaeology has been transformed from an academic discipline to a service industry that provides regulatory compliance. Much like the rest of the nation, Arizona has benefited from the identification and excavation of thousands of archaeological sites. We have learned much about what happened in the past. We have not, however, been as successful in synthesizing the new data into new understandings of why humans behaved as they did in the past and how such understandings can help society confront the key issues of our day. After reviewing the last 50 years of synthetic research in Arizona, I offer a path forward to integrate archaeology and archaeologists with other sciences and scientists to address critical issues whose solutions require a time horizon which only archaeology can provide.

Cite this Record

The Role of Synthesis in American Archaeology and Cultural Resource Management as Seen through an Arizona Lens. Jeffrey Altschul. Journal of Arizona Archaeology. 4 (1): 68-81. 2016 ( tDAR id: 446793) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8446793

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Keywords

Investigation Types
Heritage Management

General
Synthesis

File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
JAzArchV4N1_2016_68-81_Altschul.pdf 1.13mb Oct 7, 2018 10:46:58 AM Public
Article text uploaded with the permission of Glen E Rice, Editor of the Journal of Arizona Archaeology