Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (Geographic Keyword)

1-7 (7 Records)

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (32WI17) Material Culture Reports, Part VI: Preliminary Analysis of Vertebrate Fauna from the 1968-1972 Excavations (1986)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Carole A. Angus. Carl R. Falk.

National Park Service archaeological excavations at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site from 1968 through 1972. Although a preliminary report describing the extent and nature of the excavations was produced shortly after the close of each season's fieldwork, until recently the extensive collection of artifacts and other materials recovered during that work has remained largely unanalyzed and unreported for want of sufficient funding. A systematic effort to analyze and report all...


Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (32WI17), Material Culture Reports, Part IX: Personal, Domestic, and Architectural Artifacts (1993)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Steven Leroy DeVore. William J. Hunt, Jr..

Fort Union served as the major trading establishment for the American Fur Company and its St. Louis descendants (Bernard Pratte and Co. and Pierre Chouteau, Jr., and Co.) on the Upper Missouri River between 1828 and 1865. In 1865, Charles Chouteau sold Fort Union to Hubble, Hawley and Smith, otherwise known as the North Western Fur Company. During its last years of existence, between 1864 and 1866, the traders shared the post's facilities with the U.S. Army, the latter utilizing Fort Union as a...


Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (32WI17), Material Culture Reports, Part VII: Building Hardware, Construction Materials, Tools, and Fasteners (1987)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Steven Leroy DeVore.

Between 1968 and 1972, four seasons of archeological investigations were conducted at the Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, North Dakota. The fort served as the major outpost of the American Fur Company on the Upper Missouri River between 1829 and 1865. Between 1865 and 1867, the U. S. Army utilized the fort facilities as a base of operations against the Northern Plains Indians. The excavations were conducted at the fort in order to obtain structural information concerning...


Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (32WI17), Material Culture Reports, Part X: Native American Burials and Artifacts (1994)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Steven LeRoy De Vore. William J. Hunt, Jr..

Fort Union, the headquarters of American Fur Company's Upper Missouri Outfit, dominated the region's fur and bison robe trade from 1828 to 1865. The Minneapolis-based North Western Fur Company operated the trading post from 1865 to 1867 and the U.S. Army had a contingent of soldiers there from 1864 to 1865. In 1867, the Army bought and razed Fort Union for building materials in the construction of Fort Buford, a new infantry post two miles to the east. In 1965, Congress designated Fort Union a...


A Magnetic Gradiometer Survey of the Waterline Corridor at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (2000)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Robert K. Nickel. William J. Hunt, Jr..

In August 1999, archeologists from the Midwest Archeological Center conducted a magnetic survey of the existing waterline alignment at Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site. This was done as the first phase of a three-phase project whose overall goal is to assist the park in achieving Section 106 compliance in conjunction with proposed Fiscal Year 2000 installation of a new waterline. The routes of the current waterline and its replacement transect two known significant sites - the...


Monitoring of Bluff Contouring: Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (1992)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Steven E. Daron.

The purpose of the archeological work conducted at the Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site was to monitor the removal of excess fill material from the bluff south of Fort Union. Sometime after Fort Union was abandoned, a large gravel pit was dug west of the Fort. This pit removed a section of the bluff in front (south) of the Fort and part of the Fort’s southwest Bastion. After the establishment of Fort Union as a National Historic Site efforts were made to fill the eastern part of...


Utility Trench Monitoring along the West and North Walls, Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site, North Dakota (2003)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Douglas D. Scott.

The park plans to upgrade its telephone and alarm system. Trenching along the palisade was required to lay the new utility lines. Archeological monitoring was required since portions of this area were believed not to have been disturbed by previous excavation activity associated with the fort reconstruction work from 1986-1989.