North America: Southern Southwest U.S. (Geographic Keyword)

1-25 (113 Records)

Aerial Imaging Using UAVs (Drones) in Chihuahua and Nayarit, Mexico, to Map and Archive Archaeological Sites (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Searcy. Scott Ure. Michael Mathiowetz. Jaclyn Eckersley. Haylie Ferguson.

In 2017, we used UAVs (drones) to record eight archaeological sites from the air. As this type of technology becomes more refined, we have found that it is especially useful in carrying out three specific tasks: contour mapping, archiving site conditions, and identifying architecture. This paper reports our findings resulting from aerial images captured while flying archaeological sites in Nayarit and Chihuahua, Mexico.


Agave Bloom Stalk Ovens in the Southern Chihuahuan Desert (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Richard Stark.

This is an abstract from the "Hot Rocks in Hot Places: Investigating the 10,000-Year Record of Plant Baking across the US-Mexico Borderlands" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Fire cracked rock (FCR) and hearth features represent one of the most commonly observed cooking features encountered by archaeologists. This research presents an ethno-archaeological context in which FCR utilization and discard is observed, providing a Middle Range theoretical...


Agave Roasting Pits of the Mescalero Apache (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Holly Houghten.

This is an abstract from the "Hot Rocks in Hot Places: Investigating the 10,000-Year Record of Plant Baking across the US-Mexico Borderlands" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. One of the main staple foods of the Mescalero Apache was Mescal or Agave. The heart of the plant is cooked in an earth oven for four days. The plant is then eaten straight out of the oven or dried for storage and supply. Today the roasting of Mescal is still done every year in...


An Alternative Explanation for a Modified Rabbit Innominate Spatulate Tool (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert DeBry. Kristin Corl.

This is an abstract from the "Local Development and Cross-Cultural Interaction in Pre-Hispanic Southwestern New Mexico and Southeastern Arizona" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. ​Bone tools are not always recognized in a zooarchaeological analysis, and often once identified, the function or use is even more difficult to define. A modified rabbit innominate found by the authors in two Jornada-Mogollon sites presented here is one such example. The...


American Periphery, Sonoran Heartland: Recent Archaeological Explorations of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Veech.

This is an abstract from the "Transcending Boundaries and Exploring Pasts: Current Archaeological Investigations of the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (ORPI) is a vast, rugged, and remote unit of the U.S. National Park System situated in the heart of Arizona’s Sonoran Desert. Measuring 1,338.25 km² (517.7 mi²), the park encompasses an area half the size of the state of Rhode Island....


Archaeothanatological Analysis of Mortuary Practices in the Prehistoric Sonoran Desert and Implications for Interpreting Sickness through Postmortem Processing (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordan Krummel. James Watson.

The La Playa archaeological site in the Sonoran Desert represents one of the earliest agricultural settlements in northwest Mexico. Over 310 mortuary features have been uncovered during salvage excavations since the site was discovered in 1930, revealing a wide variability in mortuary practices that may reflect specific treatments for pathological or transgressive individuals after death. This paper describes analyses of burials uncovered during the 2017 field season utilizing the...


Ash Matters: The Ritual Closing of Domestic Structures in the Mimbres Mogollon Region (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Barbara Roth.

Throughout much of the Southwestern U.S., ash was an important component of ritual deposition and has ethnographically been closely associated with processes of cleansing and renewal. The presence of ash in ritual contexts is well documented, but it also appears to have played an important role in the closing of domestic structures. In this paper, I present cases of ritual closure of domestic structures and examine the role that ash played in these closures using data from pithouse sites in the...


Assessing Evidence of Hunting as Subsistence Specialization at an Early Classic Period Hohokam Farmstead (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jacqueline Fox. William Bryce. Andrea Gregory. Travis Cureton.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Logan Simpson recently mitigated multiple prehistoric sites along the Middle Gila River in Arizona for the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Florence Flood Retarding Structure Rehabilitation project. One site, AZ U:15:836(ASM), is a small Hohokam farmstead within the Grewe-Casa Grande canal system. Recent investigations at the site identified evidence...


Backpack Biographies: Re-scaling Undocumented Migration in the US-Mexico Borderlands (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Cameron Gokee. Jason De León.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeologies of Immigration and Refugee Resettlement" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Federal agencies and news media often report undocumented migration across the US-Mexico border in gross terms of hundreds of thousands to millions of crossings and apprehensions—a scalar project that then plays into broader political discourse about national belonging. In this paper we draw on research by the Undocumented Migration...


Beyond Ethical, Legal and Practical Considerations: Unprovenienced Archaeological Items at Descendant Tribal Heritage Centers and Museums (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Holly Metz.

This is an abstract from the "To Curate or Not to Curate: Surprises, Remorse, and Archaeological Grey Area" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The mission of the Huhugam Heritage Center, which is both a tribal and federal repository, is to "ensure our Akimel O’otham and Pee Posh cultures flourish for future generations." This includes not just the physical remains of ancestral culture, but the cultural practices themselves. While we care for the...


Bold Line Geometric: Revisiting a Lesser-Known Rock Art Style in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Victoria Roberts.

This is an abstract from the "The Art of Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Bold Line Geometric is one of five currently identified rock art styles in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of southwest Texas. It has previously been described as thick, glossy pigment applied in bold lines, geometric shapes, and globular anthropomorphic and zoomorphic forms. In 1965, David Gebhard laid the ground work for the initial description and definition of...


Bonita Canyon: A Chronology of Prehistoric Occupation and Predictive Analysis of Archaic Sites (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Savanna Moore.

This is an abstract from the "Partners at Work: Promoting Archaeology and Collaboration in the Chiricahua Mountains" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. One of the goals of the Student Conservation Association (SCA) is to develop the next generation of conservation leaders. While the focus is often on natural resources, cultural resources, as a nonrenewable resource, have, until recently, been neglected. Chiricahua NM has been partnering with the SCA...


A Brief History of Apache Occupation at Chiricahua National Monument (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emma Cook.

This is an abstract from the "Partners at Work: Promoting Archaeology and Collaboration in the Chiricahua Mountains" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Chiricahua National Monument, located in southeastern Arizona near Willcox, holds evidence for thousands of years of Native American occupation. Relatively recent in this timeline is occupation by the Chiricahua Apache. Up through the 19th century, the Chiricahua Apache ranged over a significant part...


Bringing the Landscape Home: The Materiality of Placemaking and Pilgrimage in Jornada Mogollon Settlement (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Myles Miller.

This is an abstract from the "Sacred Southwestern Landscapes: Archaeologies of Religious Ecology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Among prehispanic and historic societies of the American Southwest and Mesoamerica, mountains and caves had multivalent metaphorical and symbolic meanings relating to underworld, ancestors, water, and emergence. Mountains and caves are featured among origin and emergence myths and many contemporary Pueblo societies...


Camping and Hot-Rock Cooking: Hunter-Gatherer Land Use across the Southwest Pecos Slopes (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Monica Murrell. Phillip Leckman. Michael Heilen.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Understanding changes in mobility and subsistence practices among Jornada Mogollon hunter-gatherer groups remains a substantial research issue. Residents across the Permian Basin largely maintained a hunting-and-gathering cultural adaption throughout prehistoric times, although some segment of the local population practiced cultivation during the Late...


Casas Grandes Culture in the Sierra Madre of Sonora (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Pailes. John Carpenter. Guadalupe Sánchez.

This is an abstract from the "25 Years in the Casas Grandes Region: Celebrating Mexico–U.S. Collaboration in the Gran Chichimeca" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This presentation will summarize results from ongoing research on the late prehistoric period of the Sonoran Sierra Madre. Thus far, investigations focused on the Sahuaripa and Fronteras valleys. These valleys are approximately equidistant from Paquimé at 185 and 165 km, respectively. In...


The Central Arizona Project and Platform Mounds in Arizona (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Thomas Lincoln.

This is an abstract from the "Why Platform Mounds? Part 2: Regional Comparisons and Tribal Histories" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper will chronicle some of the history of the Federal investment in Big Archaeology for the Central Arizona Project. Specifically, the decisions to support a philosophy of Cultural Research Management, which facilitated a huge contribution to the archaeology of Arizona, and more broadly to the Southwest...


Ceremonial Depictions of Bighorn Sheep Anthropomorphs in the Jornada Mogollon Region (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Berrier.

This is an abstract from the "The Art and Archaeology of the West: Papers in Honor of Lawrence L. Loendorf" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Jornada Mogollon region is known for its rich body of rock art. Researchers have suggested that elements such as cloud terraces, masks, goggle-eyed figures, and horned serpents are associated with ceremony. Although hundreds of bighorn sheep images exist in the regional rock art these figures are not...


Classic Period Projectile Point Traditions in Southeastern Arizona (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stacy Ryan.

This is an abstract from the "Local Development and Cross-Cultural Interaction in Pre-Hispanic Southwestern New Mexico and Southeastern Arizona" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Similar projectile point types were used by people in central and southern Arizona during the Classic Period (A.D. 1150-1450), a time when considerable changes occurred within the region. An analysis of over 600 points was conducted to examine how social, technological, and...


Coalescence within the Gila River Farm Site and other Salado Settlements of the Upper Gila (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher La Roche. Jeffery Clark.

This is an abstract from the "Local Development and Cross-Cultural Interaction in Pre-Hispanic Southwestern New Mexico and Southeastern Arizona" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeology Southwest and the University of Arizona's Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology Field School (UGPA) have conducted excavations for three field seasons (2016-2018) at the Gila River Farm Site. This poster evaluates the extent of coalescence between Kayenta immigrant...


The Cocospera Valley in the Prehistoric, Protohistoric and Missión Period: A Corridor of Cultural Exchange? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jupiter Martinez.

This is an abstract from the "Transcending Boundaries and Exploring Pasts: Current Archaeological Investigations of the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. There is a western geographical gap between the Trincheras and Hohokam archaeological traditions in the State of Sonora, Mexico. This area is the Cocospera Valley where the prehistoric sites have artifacts from Trincheras, Hohokam and Casas Grandes traditions. In the...


Cold Cases and Forgotten Caves: Reconstructing the Provenience of Unique Artifacts from the Greater Southwest (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott Nicolay.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Museum collections contain many unique objects from the Greater Southwest that lack complete provenience, especially items from caves and other shrines. These sites often served the region’s inhabitants as both offertory locations and the terminal repositories for ceremonial objects, resulting in enormous and well-preserved assemblages, many composed primarily...


A Comprehensive Study of the Variability in Flake Scar Patterns on Clovis Fluted Points (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alan Slade. Michael Collins.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Clovis fluted points are the earliest and most technologically recognisable artefacts that covered North America between ~ 11,080 ± 40 to 10,800 ± 25 14C yr B.P. (12,994 to 12,817 Cal yrs B.P.). Although Clovis is the most well documented of the Paleoindian cultures, much more is yet to be learned from their apparent rapid expansion over the North American...


Contexts of Ash Deposits in Jornada Mogollon Pithouse and Pueblo Settlements and Reflections on Their Meanings (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Myles Miller.

The archaeological identification of intentionally deposited layers of ash at Jornada pueblo and pithouse settlements is complicated by several factors and intentional ash deposits are seldom identified unless preserved in a sealed context or buried by a layer of impermeable natural sediment or cultural deposits. When clear evidence of intentional ash deposition is observed, it may be assumed that there was a significant meaning underlying the inclusion of ash in a special context or deposit. ...


Contextualizing Campsites: Survey Results and Comparisons from Two Parajes along El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alex Koenig.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. As part of ongoing projects relating to El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, NMSU students surveyed the North Fork Paraje, a campsite near a section of the Camino Real in southern New Mexico. These ephemeral sites are generally difficult to locate, with many sites attested to in archival documents still undiscovered, resulting in a general lack of scholarship...