tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

High Altitude (Other Keyword)

1-13 (13 Records)

Camp Misery Site (1962)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 104197] Donald Jenni. Sandy Jenni.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Diet and Adaptations in a High Altitude Rockshelter of Southern Peru, Based on Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 431020] Sophia Haller Von Hallerstein. Dorothée Drucker. Katerina Harvati. Kurt Rademaker.

We present the results of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses made on well-preserved collagen of four Early and one Middle Holocene adult humans together with coeval faunal remains of Cuncaicha rockshelter in the Peruvian puna to determine paleodiet. In addition, we reconstruct important aspects of the ecology of the Pucuncho Basin, in which Cuncaicha is located, using new as well as already available and secured values for stable carbon and nitrogen of archaeological and modern fauna...


The game drives of Rocky Mountain National Park (1996)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 26908] James B. Benedict. Center for Mountain Archaeology.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Genetic Adaptation to High Altitudes: What Genotypes and What Phenotypes are Involved? (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 404051] Lorna Moore.

The question of whether human populations have adapted genetically to high altitude (HA) has been of interest since studies began there in the early 1900s. Throughout the 20th century the dominant paradigm was that the major physiological attributes of HA residents were acquired during development or reflected other shorter-term processes. With the advent of genomic technologies and statistical methods for detecting genetic evidence of natural selection, a paradigm shift and an exponential rise...


High-Altitude Occupations, Cultural Process, and High Plains Prehistory: Restrospect and Prospect (1988)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 72971] Susan J. Bender. Gary A. Wright.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Mitigative Archaeological Excavations at Two Sites for the Cottonwood Pass Project, Chaffee and Gunnison Counties, Colorado (1986)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 140744] Kevin D. Black.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Morphological Signatures of High-Altitude Adaptations in the Andean Archaeological Record and the Challenges of Distinguishing Developmental Plasticity from Genetic Adaptations (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 404044] Karen Weinstein.

High-altitude hypoxia, cold ambient temperatures, and malnutrition are critical environmental stressors affecting living human populations in the highland Andes. Decades of scholarship in human biology explain the complex physiological responses that provide adaptive fitness to living human groups at high altitudes through both developmental acclimatization, in which the human body adjusts to environmental stress during growth, and genetic adaptations from natural selection. Given the longevity...


Obsidian Sourcing and the Origin of the Occupants of the White Mountains High Altitude Villages (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 395986] Jason Edmonds.

The behaviors discussed in ethnographic accounts of the western Great Basin valleys vary widely and unexpectedly. Although both Owens Valley and Fish Lake Valley were inhabited by Eastern Mono speaking groups in historic times, their population density, settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical organization were markedly different. Archaeological debate centers on whether these differences result from historic contact or if they have some meaningful time depth into prehistory. Situated between...


PLANT RESOURCES IN GREAT BASIN HIGH ALTITUDE FORAGING (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 395976] David Rhode.

Prehistoric high altitude occupation sites in the White Mountains and Toquima Range contain archaeobotanical assemblages that inform on the use of plant resources both alpine in origin and imported from lower altitudes. Plant assemblages from the two areas show many similarities in the range of plant resources represented, as well as evident differences that reflect variable modes of high altitude living across the Great Basin. This presentation compares the plant materials from the White...


Prehistoric Mining in the High Mountains of Northern Colorado (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 429095] Robert Rowe.

Rupturing and buckling of fissures along the present valley of the Colorado River in Middle Park, Colorado, during the Miocene resulted in thick deposits of tuff and flow basalt which resulted in the Troublesome Formation. The Troublesome Formation primary consists of weakly consolidated siltstone, minor interbedded sandstone and conglomerate, and locally unconsolidated sand and gravels, and chalcedonies. As the result of the chalcedony filtering through the tuffaceous linear deposits of...


Ranger Basin Campsite (1960)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 104199] Don Jenni. Sandy Jenni.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Review of "the Archaeology of Vail Pass Camp: a Multicomponent Base Camp Below Treelimit in the Southern Rockies" By John S. Gooding (1982)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 73098] John J. Hoffman. Ann M. Johnson. William B. Butler.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Skeletal Trauma in an Ancient High Altitude Himalayan Community of Mustang, Nepal (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 397822] Jacqueline Eng. Mark Aldenderfer.

High altitude regions in the Himalayas provided a challenging environment for the early human populations who migrated there. In addition to the risks of hypoxia and cold stress, people had to deal with difficult terrain and limited resources. Yet populations persisted and established complex polities, including those in the Mustang region of Nepal. Surface recovery and excavations of shaft tombs located near the village of Samdzong in Upper Mustang have yielded human remains and artifacts...

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America