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Iconography (Other Keyword)

1-25 (65 Records)

Ambiguous Iconography: Queering the Shell Game (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 395585] Dawn Rutecki.

This paper queers archaeological interpretation by unpacking and destabilizing underlying assumptions in Southeastern iconography. While not focusing expressly on sexuality or gender in these representations, this research discusses the ways ambiguities in engraved shell iconography, more broadly, have been dismissed, glossed, and deemphasized. In part, this exclusion is unintentional and results from the amount of research that remains to be conducted on the vast body of images, but we need to...


Ancient, Modern, and Post-Modern: Pueblo Mural Painting of the Southwestern U.S. (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 396337] Kelley Hays-Gilpin.

Over a period of centuries between about AD 1000 and 1540, Ancestral Pueblo communities in what is now the southwestern U.S. developed elaborate, iconic mural painting traditions. The most detailed and best-known murals were excavated in kivas (ceremonial structures) at the sites of Awat’ovi and Kawayka’a on the Hopi Mesas, Arizona, and at Pottery Mound and Kuaua near Albuquerque, New Mexico. These murals not only express ritual and worldview in the 15th century but inspire contemporary artwork...


Anura in Moche Iconography (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 398264] Tatiana Vlemincq Mendieta.

The topic of this work is the anura, i.e. frogs and toads, in Moche iconography. Its primary aim is to establish if the anura were, in Moche cosmovision, associated with rains and agricultural fertility. During the early stages of this project, I gathered data and interpretations about the anura, while at the later stage, I built upon these findings to establish a classification system for these amphibians. The objectives of the classification are: first, to create a comprehensive database of...


Art Objects Don’t Make Themselves! A Consideration of the Ik’ Style from the Petén Lakes Region (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 404149] Megan Leight.

Art-making is an essential element of Mesoamerican culture. Asserting the primacy of the art object as a site of inquiry can provide a fascinating framework for organizing, imagining, and interpreting the past. This paper considers art objects produced during the Late Classic (ca. 600-900 CE) by the Maya Ik’ polity in Petén, Guatemala. The elaborately painted surfaces with naturalistic figures, realistic color schemes, and detailed hieroglyphic inscriptions about artists, patrons, and regional...


The Associations Model for use of Hemphill-Style Engraved Pottery at Moundville (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 398029] Erin Phillips.

This paper will examine one possible model for the use of pottery engraved in the Hemphill style at Moundville, the associations model. The Hemphill style is Moundville's local representational art style. The most commonly engraved themes in the style are winged serpents, crested birds, raptors, paired tails, center symbols and bands, and human trophies in the form of skulls, scalps, and the hand and eye design. It is suggested that these designs represent patron supernaturals relating to the...


Changing Art? Changing Identity?: Visual Culture in Ancient Veracruz during the Late Classic-Early Postclassic Transition (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 403642] Cherra Wyllie.

Group identity is visible in the archaeological record in the form of discrete burial practices, site planning, ceramic and artifact assemblages, settlement patterns, and architecture. Yet notions of ethnic identity are multi-layered and complex; the more so during periods of intense migration and social upheaval . The Late Classic to Early Postclassic transition was one such period, characterized by observable changes in practices and materials. In Veracruz (at sites such as El Tajin, Las...


Companions or Counterparts: Considering the Role of Animal Depictions in Moche Ceramics from Northern Peru (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 397543] Aleksa Alaica.

The Moche Period (1-850AD) is well known for its iconography with naturalistic depictions of a variety of different figures and themes. One aspect of the corpus that has been under-analyzed is the common representation of plant and animal life. The ceramic assemblages of the Moche depict numerous animal species from coastal, highland and Amazonian locations. Recent work conducted at the Larco Herrera Museum reveals that various animal species may have been considered important symbols of group...


Continuities of Imagery and Symbolism in the Art of the Woodlands (1985)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 210804] David W. Penney.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Cosmic Ventures of the Olmec Dwarf: An Analysis of the Dispersal and Transformation of Dwarf Imagery within Olmec Iconography (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 430679] Tara Smith.

The formative period dwarf imagery in Mesoamerica offers an exemplary opportunity to further our understanding of the Olmec cosmovision and how their ideology spread throughout the region. This study specifically compares the three monumental sandstone dwarfs at La Venta to the portable dwarfs carved in stone and sculpted from clay found elsewhere within the Olmec exchange network. I discuss the origin of Dwarf imagery within the Olmec artistic style through an analysis of stylistic trends and...


Cosmology, Calendars and Horizon-Based Astronomy in Ancient Mesoamerica (2015)

DOCUMENT [ID: 399128] Uploaded by: Chelsea Walter

Cosmology, Calendars, and Horizon-Based Astronomy in Ancient Mesoamerica is an interdisciplinary tour de force that establishes the critical role astronomy played in the religious and civic lives of the ancient peoples of Mesoamerica. Providing extraordinary examples of how Precolumbian peoples merged ideas about the cosmos with those concerning calendar and astronomy, the volume showcases the value of detailed examinations of astronomical data for understanding ancient cultures. The volume...


Death and the Afterlife in Precolumbian America (1975)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 110964] Elizabeth P. Benson.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Early Iconography of Tobacco (1944)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 177449] Jerome E. Brooks.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Enemies – Strangers – Neighbours. Image of the Others in Moche Culture (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 403816] Janusz Woloszyn.

Moche art served the purpose of not only disseminating specific content of a religious nature, but it was also a tool of social influence and control. Its iconography gives an exceptional opportunity to study the mechanisms of perceiving and presenting others (representatives of different cultural and probably also ethnic group) by a society which has not left behind any written documents for us. It is also interesting how these representations could be used in the process of shaping...


The Epiclassic from the Mexica perspective: Stone sculpture evidence (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 396134] Angel González López.

The ways in which human societies create a sense of history and incorporate it into daily life varies through time. In the Late Postclassic Basin of Mexico for example, cultural groups perpetuated, but also abandoned aspects of the stories of their ancestors. The uses, causes and reasons for this practice depends on a combination of several factors. The use of the past and how it was conceived and incorporated into the perspective of the Mexica is of particular interest. Previous studies have...


Excavations at La Venta, Tabasco, 1955 (1959)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 64772] Philip Drucker. Robert F. Heizer. Robert J. Squier.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


The Falcon and the Serpent: Life in the Southeastern United States at the Time of Columbus (1991)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 277617] James A. Brown.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Flying on the West: the Butterfly Imagery in the Aztatlán Iconography: Meaning and Worldview. (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 429463] Susana Ramirez-Urrea De Swartz.

The Aztatlán Tradition is a widespread cultural and economical system in West and Northwest Mexico from AD 850 to 1300. The Aztatlán iconography is remarkable, not only because it is rich in the variety of images and icons related to the codices, but also because it reflects a concept related to the worldview of the Aztatlán groups (and others in Central Mexico and the Mixteca-Puebla region). Butterfly imagery seems to be part of it. Some of the ceremonial vessels used in rituals or found as...


Following the Shell: Pxrf Analysis on Engraved Busycon Whelk from Spiro and Cahokia (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 404692] Bobi Deere.

Marine shell was ubiquitous in the Mississippian Southeast. In an effort to shed light on where the shell originated, X-Ray Fluorescence analysis was done on a sample of Spiro engraved shell, and on Cahokian engraved shell. As a second line of questioning, results were separated by previously assigned styles, including Braden and Craig. At this point, sourcing with the Pxrf only points to either the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Coast. However, interesting questions have arisen in the data...


Formative Period Interregional Interaction and the Emergence of Mesoamerican Scripts (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 396373] Joshua Englehardt. Michael Carrasco.

Interregional interaction often serves as a catalyst for cultural innovation. This paper explores the effects of interaction on the development of Mesoamerican scripts during the Formative period. Current models suggest that the transition from iconography to phonetic writing involved the recontextualization of visual symbols: motifs were excised from the pictorial frameworks in which they were usually contextualized and enclosed within the emergent textual–linguistic conventions and...


Fort Center's Iconographic Bestiary: A Fresh Look at Fort Center's Zoomorphic Wood Carvings (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 403395] S. Spivey.

The zoomorphic wood carvings excavated by William Sears from the mortuary pond at the Fort Center (8GL13) site in South Florida are a chronically understudied assemblage. These artifacts are generally interpreted as totems carved into a single contemporaneous dock structure built above the mortuary pond, later excavated in various states of degradation. I propose a preliminary typology through which to interpret their function. Beyond that, I discuss the form the carvings individually take and...


Getting Carried Away - A Petroglyphic Litter Scene from Cenote Ceh' Yax, Yucatan, Mexico (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 403344] Donald Slater.

During reconnaissance in a dry cenote at the small site of Ceh’ Yax, Mexico, members of the Central Yucatan Archaeological Cave Project discovered an in-situ monument incised with a petroglyphic scene depicting a dignitary seated within a litter. Although litters are not commonly shown in Mesoamerican imagery, they do appear on lintels, wall graffiti, codex-style Maya vases, and as ceramic effigies. This paper will present an analysis of Mesoamerican litter iconography which will demonstrate...


HB Nicholson and the Gulf Coast (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 431147] Rex Koontz.

While known primarily as an Aztec specialist, HB Nicholson was instrumental in beginning a dialog on regional iconographies. A key example of this dialog was his work on deity complexes. Building on his mastery of the ethnohistorical data, Nicholson’s work on deity complexes attempted to locate particular deity groups with certain regions. This essay looks at Nicholson’s hypotheses on Gulf Coast iconography and how those hypotheses have helped shape the regional iconographies now being...


Human-object relationships in Classic Maya contexts: Object technologies, political participants, and cultural infrastructures (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 396783] Sarah Jackson.

This paper examines the foundational cultural infrastructure provided by seemingly quotidian objects in Classic Maya (ca. AD 250-900) contexts. These materials (things like ceramic vessels, stone benches, and mirrors) carry out prosaic tasks (e.g., containing, supporting, reflecting), but also higher-order relational work, taking on roles as non-human "persons," and as partners in social relationships. In this paper, I focus on these human-object relationships in order to recast our view of...


An Iconic Rebellion: Exploring Spanish Impact on Pueblo Iconography (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 405137] Heather Seltzer.

The mission period of the American Southwest during the late 1500s and early 1600s, is defined by the adoption of Spanish Catholicism by the Pueblo people. Missionaries gradually introduced the Pueblo people to Catholicism in order to obliterate and replace the Pueblo peoples’ traditional religion. The result of the Pueblo people resisting the Spanish, created a form of religious syncretism in which Pueblo people were forced to blend Christianity with their traditional religion in order to...


The Iconography and History of the Hacha in Classic Veracruz (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 402887] Rex Koontz.

The hacha has long served as a key element in the yoke/hacha/palma complex of portable sculpture known chiefly for Classic Veracruz (c. 100-1000 CE) and closely related to the Mesoamerican ball game. Scholars have rightly associated hacha iconography with a specific decapitation sacrifice and related that sacrifice to rites surrounding rubber ball game. While this iconographical analysis is sound, it does little to explain the appearance of the hacha as a new category of material object, as well...

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America