Cooperation (Other Keyword)

1-13 (13 Records)

Bridging the Boundary Between Archeological Site Protection and Natural Resources Invasive Species Management in the National Park Service: A Case Study of Robinia pseudoacacia Management at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ashley Barnett. Keri Deneau.

Archeologists have identified many historic archeological sites by the presence of cultural vegetation. When Euro-Americans claimed homesteads, they often planted exotic vegetation species on their properties, either for beautification of their land or for utilitarian purposes. In the National Park Service (NPS), natural resource programs now consider many of these non-native species to be invasive and have instituted management plans to stop the uncontrolled spread of these plants. The fact...


Cooperation and Competition Among Primitive Peoples (1937)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Mead.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Cooperative practices in hunter-fisher-gatherers from Tierra del Fuego: a study on resource visibility and social sharing (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jorge Caro. Maria Pereda. Ivan Briz. Myrian Álvarez. Debora Zurro.

Cooperation studies have become an essential area of knowledge across different disciplines. Within the humanities and the social sciences, it has been used to explain human behaviour as well as the maintenance of the social tissue itself. It has also given clues to explain the variability and the plasticity of human social organization at different levels. In this presentation we focus on Yamana society a nomadic hunter-fisherer-gatherer group that inhabited the southernmost region of South...


Despotism, cooperation, and the evolution of social hierarchy in prehistoric Hawai‘i (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert DiNapoli.

Ancient Hawaiian society is often emphasized as a locus for the evolution of complex hierarchical polities. At the time of European contact, Hawaiian society was divided into a large class of commoners and a smaller class of hereditary chiefs and land-managers, the latter controlling a vastly disproportionate share of land and resources. This despotism by Hawaiian elites is regularly emphasized in discussions of the ‘development of the state’; however, the high level of cooperation inherent in...


The Emergence of Cultural Consensus in Hunter-Gatherers: Towards a Computer Model of Ethnogenesis in the Past (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Juan Barcelo. Florencia Del Castillo Bernal.

In this contribution we present the results of a computer simulation of an "artificial society", implemented to understand how cultural identities and cultural standardization may have emerged in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer society as a consequence of restricted cooperation. The aim of the model is to explain how diversity and self-identification may have emerged in the small-scale societies of our prehistoric past. The computer model explores some possible consequences of theoretical...


Peasants, Agricultural Intensification, and Collective Action in Pre-Modern States (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lane Fargher. Richard Blanton.

Historically, anthropological archaeologists assumed that intensification, in complex societies, involved a combination of population pressure and state direction, which culminated in the rise of powerful, centralized states. However, intensive research over the last 30 years has considerably altered our concepts of intensification and the state. Drawing on landscape archaeology and alternative pathways theory, we consider how diverse political-economic and landscape strategies interact to...


Religious belief and cooperation in Viking societies (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark Collard. Ben Raffield. Neil Price.

It has become clear in recent years that it was not uncommon for Viking groups to be heterogeneous. Numerous studies carried out over the last 25 years indicate that, in the short term at least, sociocultural diversity has a negative impact on trust within communities, and that this leads to a reduction in the willingness of community members to support public projects. Thus, one issue raised by the discovery that many Viking groups were heterogeneous is how loyalty to the group was achieved. In...


A Road to Forager Cooperation (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Steven Kuhn. Mary Stiner.

Humans have a unique capacity among primates for cooperation. Recent foragers routinely cooperate in economic activities, and a range of social mechanisms help maintain that cooperation. We argue on the basis of hunting practices and weapon systems that some of these social mechanisms emerged comparatively late in hominin evolutionary history. Large game hunting by Early and Middle Pleistocene hominins involved simple, short range weapons and depended on participation of multiple individuals....


The Samoans (1937)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Mead.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Selfish for Shellfish, or Magnanimous about Mollusks? The Transformation of Cooperation across the First Millennium CE at Crystal River and Roberts Island, Florida, USA (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Thomas Pluckhahn. Victor Thompson. Isabelle Lulewicz. Trevor Duke. Matthew Compton.

This is an abstract from the "Complex Fisher-Hunter-Gatherers of North America" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Blanton and Fargher (2016) critique evolutionary theorists for the assumption that cooperation was a single evolutionary hurdle; even if our species overcame such an obstacle in our distant evolutionary development, it is simplistic to assume that cooperation and collective action have been unchanged around the world over the last 100,000...


The Signaling and Inheritance of Cooperation: Artificial Cranial Modification among Altiplano Foragers (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Randy Haas. James Watson. Carlos Viviano. Mark Aldenderfer.

We report on the recent archaeological discovery of a 7000-year-old population of hunter-gatherer burials and discuss the key insights they offer into how hunter-gatherer societies may have maintained cooperative structure against evolutionary odds. Sixteen human burials interred at the site of Soro Mik'aya Patjxa in the Andean Altiplano of Peru consistently exhibit intentional artificial cranial modification (ACM)—the irreversible shaping of human crania during infancy. Our analysis of cranial...


Stable Isotope Perspectives on Intra-Community Sharing (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jelmer Eerkens.

Stable isotope analyses of human skeletal tissues provide estimates of paleodiet at the scale of the individual. This paper explores intra- and inter-community variation in stable nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur isotopes in human bone and teeth as insight into the prevalence of food sharing in several ancient hunter-gatherer burial populations in California. The goal, in particular, is to trace intra-community variation over time to examine how cooperative foraging and food-sharing strategies...


Synergies of Success: Stories of Avocational/Professional Archeology in Arizona (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Wilcox.

The history of archaeology is replete with stories about the synergies that have come from relationships between professional and avocational archaeologists whose cooperation repeatedly has produced significant contributions to knowledge. Recalling some of those stories today is a valuable reminder of how such success is crafted, and perhaps a guide to how it again can be realized. Frank Hamilton Cushing, Erich Schmidt, Byron Cummings, Emil Walter Haury and my own experience provide five such...