Isotopic Analysis (Other Keyword)

1-17 (17 Records)

The Anthropogenic Landscape of Las Capas, an Early Agricultural Irrigation Community in Southern Arizona (2015)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Rachel Fernandez

Las Capas, AZ AA:12:111 (ASM), so named for its deeply stratified deposits, dates primarily to the San Pedro phase of the Early Agricultural period, circa 1200-800 B.C. Later, more sporadic occupation of the site extends from the Cienega phase (800 B.C.-A.D. 50) through the Hohokam sequence and the Protohistoric period. Occupation prior to approximately 2100 B.C. is suggested by several radiocarbon dates on maize found redeposited in younger contexts. Recent excavations at the site and its...


Degrees of Change: The Transition from Paleoindian to Archaic (2021)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joshua Vallejos.

This is an abstract from the "Cabinets of Curiosities: Collections and Conservation in Archaeological Research" session, at the 86th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The transition between the Paleoindian (13,000–8000) and Archaic (8000–1000) periods continues to elude North American archaeologists. It is inferred from archaeological evidence that human populations were nomadic hunter-gatherers during both periods. The creation of storage pits, however, provides...


Does Exposure to Heat Alter Stable Isotope Values of Ostrich Eggshell? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia McNeill. Bryna Hull. Teresa Steele.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeological sites in Africa and Asia often contain large amounts of eggshell fragments from ostriches (Struthio spp.), indicating that these birds and their eggs were a valuable source of protein and calories for hunter-gatherers. Despite their abundance, however, ostrich eggshell (OES) remains understudied. Stable isotopic values preserved in...


Early Hominin Paleoecology (2013)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Chelsea Walter

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of hominin paleoecology for advanced undergraduate students and beginning graduate students, Early Hominin Paleoecology offers an up-to-date review of the relevant literature, exploring new research and synthesizing old and new ideas. Recent advances in the field and the laboratory are not only improving our understanding of human evolution but are also transforming it. Given the increasing specialization of the individual fields of study in...


Entering the "Valley of Death": Isotopic Evidence of Vulnerable Survivors at Roman Period Kellis, Egypt (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sandra Wheeler. Lana Williams. Tosha Dupras.

Breast-fed infants living in communities with adequate food access experience particularly high health risks during complementary feeding between ages 6 to 36 months. The most vulnerable of these die in this period, characterized as the "valley of death," which represents a biocultural reality. The majority of those who survive are "vulnerable survivors." The Kellis 2 cemetery sample (Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, AD 50-450) provides a unique opportunity to analyze effects of biocultural disruptions...


Evaluating Mobility, Monumentality, and Feasting at the Sapelo Island Shell Ring Complex (2011)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Victor Thompson. C. Fred T. Andrus.

Two of the most salient anthropological questions regarding southeastern shell ring sites are related to the season(s) that they were occupied and whether or not the deposits represent monumental constructions and/or feasting remains. This paper addresses these questions through the analysis of growth band of clams (Mercenaria spp.) (N = 620) and stable oxygen isotope ratios of clam and oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) (N = 58) at the Sapelo Island Shell Ring complex located on the Georgia...


"A feast of meat, a day of sociability": Examining Patterns in Turkey Management in the Cibola Region, AD 1150-1400 (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Oas. Christopher Schwartz.

This is an abstract from the "Zooarchaeology and Technology: Case Studies and Applications" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Recent genetic and isotopic studies highlight important variations in the nature, timing, and intensity of domesticated turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) management practices across the northern U.S. Southwest. While a degree of intensification in turkey production has been associated with widespread settlement aggregation in the...


Geographical origin assignment of sheep wool textiles using light stable isotopes (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Isabella Von Holstein.

Identifying which of a group of material cultural objects is non-local has long been part of artefact analysis in archaeology. Identifying the movement of objects, and the movement of ideas about how to make and use objects, is important to understanding physical and ideological links between sites. This work has relied on data from typological, technological and chemical analyses of object construction and use. Textiles made from sheep wool were a highly valuable commodity which was traded...


Invisible Women in a World of Men: The Textile Trade in the North Atlantic, AD 1000–1600 (2021)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michele Hayeur Smith.

This is an abstract from the "Social Archaeology in the North and North Atlantic (SANNA 3.0): Investigating the Social Lives of Northern Things" session, at the 86th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Waterlogged or deeply buried deposits from medieval harbors in certain northern European towns have produced large and well-preserved textile assemblages that contain a surprising number of non-indigenous textiles. Some of these appear to have originated in the North...


Persistence in Turkey Husbandry Practices in the Southwest and Four Corners Region: The Isotopic and Ethnohistorical Evidence (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Catherine Mendel. Deanna Grimstead.

Research has demonstrated an independent domestication event of Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) occurred in the Southwestern USA between 200 BC—AD 500, which was separate from the domestication of turkey within the Mesoamerican world. While aDNA analyses revealed this as a separate and distinct event, we still know little about how turkey husbandry was practiced in the prehistoric Southwest, USA, Northwest, Mexico, and Four Corners regions. Our research applies carbon and nitrogen isotopes to a...


Persistence in Turkey Husbandry Practices in the Southwest and Four Corners Region: The isotopic and ethnohistorical evidence (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Catherine Mendel. Deanna Grimstead. Joan Coltrain. Harlan McCaffery. Tiffany Rawlings.

This is an abstract from the "Current Research on Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) Domestication, Husbandry and Management in North America and Beyond" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. aDNA analysis reveals an independent domestication event of Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) occurred in the Southwestern United States between 200 BC—AD 500. While this event was distinct from the domestication of turkey within the Mesoamerican world approximately 2000 years...


Population Movements, Trading, and Identity along the East Coast of Postclassic Yucatan. Dental morphology, isotopic provenience analyses and body modifications in human series from El Meco, El Rey, and Tulum, Quintana Roo, Mexico (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Allan Ortega. T. Douglas Price. James E. Burton. Andrea Cucina. Vera Tiesler.

Different hypotheses exist for explaining population development and replacement on the east coast of the Yucatan peninsula after the so-called Maya collapse, one involving the presence of the Putun-Chontal folk fringing the Gulf Coast of Mexico. Here we examine these proposals through the lenses of conventional paleodemography, dental morphology, body modifications (dental decorations and head shaping) of human skeletal series from the Postclassic coastal trader settlements of El Meco, El Rey...


The Salmon of Knowledge: Determining the influence of marine-derived isotopes on the diets of medieval and early modern Irish populations (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elise Alonzi. Ryan Lash. Terry O'Hagan. Anne Wildenhain. Ian Kuijt.

Many medieval and early modern villages and abbeys in County Galway, Ireland are situated directly on the coast. This study seeks to understand the pathways that marine resources follow as they enter diets of religious and lay Irish populations by using isotopic, ethnographic, and historical evidence. The isotopic portion of this study elucidates how marine-derived isotopes cycle through the coastal Irish landscape and are included in the diet. Ecological sampling on the Atlantic island,...


Stable Isotope Analysis of the Diet of Romans and Langobards in the Veneto from Late Antiquity to the Medieval Period (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ashley Maxwell. Robert H. Tykot.

Limited isotopic research has been conducted in the Veneto, Italy during the transitional period after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and arrival of the Germanic Langobards in the sixth century AD. Questions remain of the local implications of diet during this period of instability, when invasions and population decline occurred. Thus, this research compares Roman and Langobard populations from late antiquity to the medieval period using stable isotope analysis on bone collagen, apatite,...


Strontium and oxygen isotopic evidence of the origins of homicide victims from Middle Islamic Period Qasr Hallabat (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kathryn Parker. Megan Perry. Drew Coleman. David Dettman.

Qasr Hallabat, a luxurious Umayyad (7th – 8th century A.D.) desert retreat in Jordan, declined after the mid-8th century due to political destabilization and earthquakes. Despite official abandonment, the qasr’s extensive hydraulic resources were utilized by local groups. Excavation and restoration of the qasr by the Spanish Archaeological Mission discovered the remains of six individuals at the bottom of an internal cistern, a precious regional water source. These individuals, who perished...


The Walking Dead: Osteological and isotopic indicators of mobility from Middle Bronze Age commingled human and faunal burials in Naxcivan, Azerbaijan (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Selin Nugent. Hannah Lau.

Tracing the mobility patterns of pastoralists and their herds is a critical part of illuminating the lifeways of people who inhabited the southern Caucasus in the past. During the 2014 season, the Naxcivan Archaeological Project excavated several Middle Bronze age kurgans overlooking the Şərur Plain. In these burials humans and animals were interred together, speaking to the significance of the animals in the lifeways of the people inhabiting the area during the Middle Bronze Age. We correlate...


White Eye Traditional Knowledge Camp: Exploring Prehistoric Subsistence Behavior through Gwich’in Traditional Ways of Knowing (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dougless Skinner. Paul Williams Sr.. Holly McKinney. Michael Koskey.

This study explores how indigenous archaeological methods can quantitatively assess prehistoric subsistence practices in interior Alaska. Archaeological sites in Alaska are among the oldest in the Americas, providing valuable information concerning human/animal interactions. Although there are substantial amounts of archaeological information present in the literature, there is a distinct lack of indigenous ecological knowledge. The goal of this project is to combine traditional indigenous ways...