Pueblo (Other Keyword)

1-25 (117 Records)

All Potted Up: Exploring Seasonality at Small Late Pueblo II and Early Pueblo III Sites at Petrified Forest National Park (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert (Reuven) Sinensky.

Researchers have conducted archaeological investigations within the vicinity of what is now Petrified Forest National Park (PEFO) for over 100 years. Although the majority of archaeological sites identified at Petrified Forest National Park consist of small habitation sites that date to the late Pueblo II (1030-1125 AD) and early Pueblo III (1125-1225 AD) periods, archaeologists have gathered little information regarding the habitation practices of people during this transitional time period....


An Analysis of Ceramic Imitation and Trade at the Petrified Forest National Park (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christina Stewart.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeological Research in Petrified Forest National Park" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Petrified Forest National Park has a long range of occupation; however, the variety of artifacts present from these occupations makes it difficult to access the relationships early residents had with neighboring communities. Over the last decade, researchers have identified a diverse range of ceramics from across the...


Ancestral Pueblo Essentials: Evidence for Layered Social Institutions during the Basketmaker III Period in the Northern Southwest (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shanna Diederichs.

This is an abstract from the "Adopting the Pueblo Fettle: The Breadth and Depth of the Basketmaker III Cultural Horizon" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. A range of evidence suggests that the Ancestral Pueblo tradition of the northern Southwest crystallized during the Basketmaker III period in the sixth and seventh centuries A.D. As farming was adopted and populations expanded, social problems related to conflict mitigation, land tenure, and private...


The Animals of Pueblo Ritual: Faunal Analysis of a Kiva from Pot Creek Pueblo, NM (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melanie Cootsona. Madeleine Strait.

This poster reports on the analysis of the faunal remains from a D-shaped kiva in use during the late 1200s or early 1300s at Pot Creek Pueblo in the northern Rio Grande region of New Mexico. The kiva was decommissioned in a highly ceremonial manner with both human and animal interments, as well as a variety of additional animal offerings on the floor. Additional animal deposits in the fill of the kiva, suggesting the continued use of the space as a receptacle for offerings. Close analysis of...


Anshe Ky’an’a and Zuni Traditions of Movement (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Maren Hopkins. Octavius Seowtewa.

After the Zuni people emerged into this present world from Ribbon Falls in the Grand Canyon, they set out on a centuries-long journey in search of their spiritual and physical destination, Idiwana. During their travels, the Zuni people split into groups and moved in different directions, forming medicine societies, acquiring song and prayers, and gaining knowledge about the environment that would become the core of their cultural practices into the present. As such, the places of Zuni’s past...


Archaeological Prospection Using Aerial Thermography and Quantitative Image Processing Methods (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel Levin. May Yuan. Michael Adler.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper explores new methods and developments in thermal remote sensing, aerial thermography, for archaeological research. These methods are applied in a pilot study at Picuris Pueblo, NM. Principles of thermal remote sensing that enable subsurface prospection are considered, along with previous investigations in this arena. Expanding upon existing...


An Archaeology of Becoming (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel Duwe. Robert Preucel.

From the emergence into this world to the settling of the modern villages, the Pueblos view their own history as a dynamic, living process. While key elements of Pueblo identity and worldview have always been with the people, migration experiences and the amalgamation of people with diverse backgrounds and beliefs were essential in shaping the culture and cosmology of each Pueblo group. This process – called ‘becoming’ by Pueblo scholars – is never complete and represents the malleability of the...


Ashes, Arrows, and Sorcerers (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Judy Berryman. William H. Walker.

Magic and witchcraft, like many classic topics in the anthropology of religion, involve everyday things such as dogs, plant pollen, ashes, and arrow points. As such the archaeological record offers a rich source of ancient religious practices if we can link formation of its deposits to past ritual activities. For example, strata exhibiting ash and projectile points deposited on floors and in the fill of abandoned houses may derive from protective magic. Rather than haphazardly tossed hearth...


Assemblages and Power in the Casas Grandes Region. (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jerimy Cunningham.

This is an abstract from the "25 Years in the Casas Grandes Region: Celebrating Mexico–U.S. Collaboration in the Gran Chichimeca" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeologists working in the Casas Grandes region generally acknowledge that sites such as Paquimé reflect a social system defined by systemic inequality. Yet, to date little work has been done to document exactly what "inequality" likely meant for people living in the region during the...


Assessing the Potential for ED-XRF in Archaeometric Studies: A Focus on Data Sharing and Bulk Chemical Analysis (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeffrey R. Ferguson.

This is an abstract from the "Advances in Obsidian Studies of the Old and New Worlds" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Over the past few decades, the increasing use of compositional studies of archaeological materials has dramatically enhanced our knowledge of the past, but as the diversity and availability of analytical techniques increases it is necessary to understand all of the variables involved in the choice of analytical method. In this...


Background and Motivations: The Anthropology of K'uuyemugeh (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Bruce Bernstein.

This is an abstract from the "From Collaboration to Partnership in Pojoaque, New Mexico" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The K’uuyemugeh Project is designed to develop new methodologies, providing opportunities for Pojoaque community members to oversee, participate and interpret ancestral sites and their continuing relevance in telling ancestral and more recent histories. As a cultural anthropologist the work is also designed to bring the...


The Basketmaker Component of Cave Canyon Village, Montezuma Canyon, San Juan County, Utah (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Glenna Nielsen-Grimm. Diana Christensen Hawks.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeological Research in Montezuma Canyon, San Juan County, Utah" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Cave Canyon Village is a large, multi-component site investigated through survey and excavation by Brigham Young University Archaeology Field School in 1975-78. Two years of excavation in the Basketmaker component of the site uncovered 5 large pit structures, and associated small slab-lined cists that date to the...


Bird Behavior and Biology: A Consideration of the Agentive Role of Birds in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katelyn Bishop.

As one of the only classes in the animal kingdom capable of flight, birds are privy to a realm of movement that humans can only partially control. Birds possess specific traits and engage in a variety of behaviors that directly affect the mechanics of capture and use, such as gregariousness and flock size, preferences in nesting and feeding locations, wing strength and readiness to flush, and aggressiveness and territoriality. Human-bird relationships also move beyond the semantics of capture to...


Blending Architectural Traditions at the Edge of Cibola, New Mexico (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Paul Reed.

The archaeological zone south of Grants, New Mexico and north of Quemado, New Mexico has long represented an enigma for southwestern archaeologists. Straddling the so-called Mogollon-Pueblo boundary and lying south of the boundary between the Pueblos of Acoma and Zuni, its archaeology combines traits of multiple cultural traditions. Detailed recording at sites in the area reveals a mix of architectural approaches including use of adobe, sandstone, and igneous rock—often at the same site. This...


Bringing Together Accounts of the Pueblo of Pojoaque (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel Villarreal Catanach.

This is an abstract from the "From Collaboration to Partnership in Pojoaque, New Mexico" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Until recently, widely accessible published works concerning the Pueblo of Pojoaque, its people, culture, and history, have come by way of mostly non-Native academics and other researchers. While highly valuable for understanding this Tewa community’s past, they often carry the inherent biases of their authors or leave out the...


Burning as Ritual in the Jornada Mogollon (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Todd Scarbrough. Kristin Corl. Dylan Clark. Sunnie Sartin.

What is the significance of multiple burning events at Cottonwood Spring Pueblo (LA 175) an El Paso Phase (A.D. 1300-1450) Mogollon village in Southwest New Mexico? What do these burning events tell us about the life history of the pueblo? When did they occur? How do they compare to burning events at contemporary sites in the American Southwest? Contextual evidence suggests they are separate ritual events. What purposes did these events serve? How do they differ from other purposeful pueblo...


The Canids of Arroyo Hondo: a reanalysis (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Victoria Bowler. Emily Jones. Cyler Conrad.

Domestic dogs were an important part of human cultures in the prehistoric American Southwest; the significance of these animals is apparent from ceramic decorations and clay figurines, as well as faunal remains. But how these animals functioned within Southwestern cultures is less well-understood. Prehistoric dogs’ roles in some cases seem to have been similar to those of modern dogs: protector, worker, and pet. However, zooarchaeological data have shown that dogs, like turkeys, were also used...


The Casas Grandes Flower World and its Antecedents in Northwest Mesoamerica and the U.S. Southwest (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Mathiowetz.

This is an abstract from the "The Flower World: Religion, Aesthetics, and Ideology in Mesoamerica and the American Southwest" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. One of the key issues in the study of the Flower World complex is determining the chronology and nature of its transmission from Mesoamerica to the U.S. Southwest. Scholars contend that the most clear material culture and symbolic evidence indicates that the Flower World was present in the...


Ceramics of Sterling Site and Cultural Interaction along the Middle San Juan River, New Mexico (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hayward Franklin.

This is an abstract from the "Social Interaction and Networks at the Intersection of Central Mesa Verde and Chaco/Cibola Culture Areas in the Middle San Juan River Valley" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Ceramic analysis of older collections from the Sterling Site on the San Juan River reveal local and imported types from Cibola-Chaco, Chuska Valley, and northern San Juan districts. Pottery suggests active interaction between populations from three...


Changes in the Sources of Olivine-Tempered Ceramics and the Social Interaction Patterns among the Virgin Branch Ancestral Pueblo (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sachiko Sakai.

Various forms of social interactions seem to have been adopted as risk-buffering strategies in the marginal agricultural environment of the Virgin Branch Ancestral Puebloan region. The olivine-tempered ceramics are widely distributed in this region and the sources of olivine are in the highlands near Mt. Trumbull and Tuweep. Thus, the presence of olivine-tempered ceramics in the lowland Virgin area indicates economic and social ties between the highland and lowland populations. This ceramic...


The Changing Scale of Integrative Pueblo Communities in the Northern San Juan Region: Basketmaker III through Pueblo III. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Grant Coffey. Susan Ryan.

Most studies of ancestral Pueblo communities in the northern San Juan region of southwestern Colorado use clusters of roughly contemporary habitations, often associated with public architecture, to define the spatial extent of residential communities. The term "community" has also been used to define important social groupings at both larger and smaller spatial scales depending on the focus of study and the type of social connection suggested. This study uses the locations of great kivas, one of...


Chasing Tlaloc and Dragonflies in the Mimbres Valley: An Analysis of Ceramic Distribution and Style (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Danielle Romero. Barbara Roth. Darrell Creel.

Anthropomorphic and zoomorphic figures were common design elements on Classic Mimbres ceramics. However, certain forms and motifs were more widely used than others. During the 2016 field season at the Elk Ridge Ruin, a bowl with a Tlaloc figure was recovered from a burned ramada area, and a sherd with a partial dragonfly was found in one of the pueblo rooms. While both of these figures were included on rock art panels, they were infrequent on ceramics. This paper examines the presence of...


Colonowares and Colono-kachinas in the Spanish-American Borderlands: Appropriation and Authenticity in Pueblo Material Culture, 1600-1950 (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Liebmann.

Following the Spanish colonization of New Mexico, Pueblo peoples began to adopt various technologies, cultural practices, and beliefs introduced to them by their colonial overlords.  This tradition continues today, with contemporary appropriations of "foreign" elements into "traditional" Pueblo practices.  How should we as historical archaeologists interpret this appropriation of outside influences and material culture?  This paper explores the phenomenon of post-colonial difference through case...


Cultural Icons: Understanding Social Identity through Iconography in the Contact Era Pueblo World (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather Seltzer.

The arrival of the Spanish shattered the Pueblo people’s worldview in the Rio Grande during the 16th century. Nevertheless, the Pueblo people held onto specific icons that socially identified them as Pueblo, while yet creating Spanish commissioned pottery and other Spanish materials. The 1680 Pueblo Revolt and cultural revitalization movement by Puebloan groups sought to return indigenous peoples to their heritage through an emphasis on traditional religious practices and lifeways. Using...


The Cultural Importance of Obsidian in the Upper Gila Area (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shiloh Craig.

This is an abstract from the "Local Development and Cross-Cultural Interaction in Pre-Hispanic Southwestern New Mexico and Southeastern Arizona" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Obsidian is a common flaked stone raw material in archaeological sites in the Upper Gila area of southwest New Mexico. Recent excavations at the Cliff phase Salado (AD 1300-1450+) site of Gila River Farm recovered numerous examples of flaked stone tools, projectile points,...