Arpa (Other Keyword)

1-9 (9 Records)

Applying the Archaeological Resources Protection Act to Rock Art (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Linea Sundstrom.

The Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA) provides a legal framework for site protection. A review of various ARPA cases involving rock art points out the advantages and challenges of referring rock art vandalism and theft for prosecution. Case outcomes have ranged from out-of-court settlements to fines to incarceration. The keys to successful prosecution of such cases are appropriate public education about archaeological resource protection laws, competent gathering of evidence,...


Archeology and the Federal Government (1994)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Chelsea Walter

This is a special issue of the National Park Service's journal, CRM, articles in this issue provides information about federal agencies' archeological activities in parks and other federal lands, Indian tribes, states, local governments and the private sector. This special issue of CRM magazine focuses on the protection and management of archeological sites, collections, and data. The National Strategy for Federal Archeology encompasses public education and participation, public use of the...


Cultural Resource Protection Responsibilities: On Being a Federal Archeologist (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Caven Clark.

Archeologists who have chosen a career with a Federal agency have many responsibilities that are different than those of academics, chief among which is to be the subject matter expert and/or champion/advocate for the protection of the non-renewable resource. It’s not a question of which is better, more relevant, or more important, but that we as Federal archeologists have a compelling need to be conversant in cultural resource law, to assist in investigations, and educate our peers, our...


First ARPA Conviction In Oklahoma (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert W. Jobson, Jr.. Frank R. Winchell.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


A History of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act: Law and Regulations (1985)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Chelsea Walter

With the aim to present a current topic of debate in archeology and the federal government that would interest the archeological community, publisher Jacqueline Nichols and editor Janet L. Friedman of the American Archeology journal issued a special selection of articles titled “ARPA.” This journal segment provides a history of the Archaeological Resources Protection Act, its conception, development, and the laws and regulations established in the process. Senator Jeff Bingaman offers the...


The Intersection at Biscayne National Park of Looting as a Traditional Form of Recreation, Submerged Cultural Resources, and Management Practice (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Morgan. Dave Conlin. Charles Lawson.

Protecting archeological sites from looting is one of the constant challenges facing the 66 park units in the Southeast Region of the U.S. National Park Service. One park in particular--Biscayne National Park--eclipses the others in terms of the quantity and destructiveness of looting it suffers. Research since 2010 at the HMS Fowey, English China, Black, Pillar Dollar, Brick, Long Reef Cannon, and other shipwrecks illustrates the severity of the problem. The submerged nature of the resources is...


Legal Issues Concerning Cultural Heritage Resources Damage Assessments (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Todd Swain.

The Archaeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA) was passed in 1979. ARPA requires archaeologists to calculate three different types of value to quantify the amount of loss in federal looting incidents – archaeological value, commercial value and cost of restoration and repair. In 2002, a section was added to the U. S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines to cover the damage, theft and trafficking of Cultural Heritage Resources. These guidelines also require archaeologists to calculate the amount of...


The Listing of Outlaw Treachery (LOOT) Federal Clearinghouse: 35 Years of Data (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Mudar. Leah Burgin.

Despite the development of sophisticated online legal search engines and ready availability of certain types of court documents, the 35-year-old LOOT Clearinghouse continues to collect unique information about looting and vandalism of archeological sites on Federal lands. Comparison of LOOT data with data from other sources suggest that legal search engines provide more extensive information about litigated cases, while LOOT contains more information about non-ARPA cases and cultural resource...


Preventing Cultural Resources Destruction: Taking Action through Interpretation (1999)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jan S. Ryan.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.