arctic (Other Keyword)

1-25 (116 Records)

1000 Years of Small Bird Capture in NW Greenland (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erika Ebel. Christyann Darwent. Genevieve LeMoine. John Darwent.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Excavations in 2012 and 2016 at Iita, located along the North Water Polynya in NW Greenland, revealed unmixed stratified deposits extending from Late Dorset habitation over 1000 years ago through Thule-Inughuit occupation and Inughuit contact with Arctic explorers ca. 1850–1917. Iita is unique in that a large dovekie colony breeds in this area annually, thus...


A 2000-Year-Old Family: Interpreting Site Structure and Human Behaviors at the Swan Point Site, Interior Alaska (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gerad Smith.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper seeks to interpret the spatial patterning of the Swan Point Locus 2 site, interpreted to be a seasonal residential site. The site, located on a hill overlooking a small northern tributary of the Tanana River, consists of several features in excellent preservation. The assemblage suggests a pattern of features and artifacts consistent with a...


Alaskan Legacy Collections Outside Alaska: Challenges, Opportunities and Potential (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Annalisa Hppner.

This is an abstract from the "SANNA v2.2: Case Studies in the Social Archaeology of the North and North Atlantic" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Alaskan "legacy collections" are housed at many American institutions outside of Alaska. These collections contain great potential for object-focused analysis, looking toward specific object classes, or even individual objects for in-depth review. This poster will present a summary of the locations of...


(Almost) Making it in the Margins: Medieval Norse Adaptation to the Arctic Fjord Environments (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christian K. Madsen. Jette Arneborg. Ian Simpson. Michael Nielsen. Cameron Turley.

The medieval Norse settlements in Greenland formed the westernmost frontier of Scandinavia, and the Old World, between ca. AD 980-1450. A Norse society of perhaps only some 2500 farmer-hunters settled two subarctic niches: the Eastern Settlement in South Greenland with ca. 550 sites and the smaller Western Settlement 500 km north in the inner parts of the Nuuk fjord region and with only some 90 sites. For still not completely understood reasons, the latter was completely abandoned by AD...


Ancient Alaskan Firewood Management Strategies and the Role of Selectivity: Preliminary Results (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Laura Crawford.

When historic Alaskans chose a settlement site, access to adequate fuel was as important as the availability of food and water. Despite its importance fuel use in the Arctic and Subarctic has received relatively little attention. Work currently underway aims to clarify the criteria used to select fuel in ancient Alaska by testing two hypotheses. The Efficiency Maximization hypothesis, derived from the prey choice model of human behavioral ecology, proposes that Alaskans ranked woody taxa...


Anna and the Sea: Reflections on Anna Kerttula's Influence on a Generation of North Pacific Archaeology (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ben Fitzhugh. Catherine West. Sven Haakanson.

This is an abstract from the "Celebrating Anna Kerttula's Contributions to Northern Research" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeological research in Alaska and the broader North Pacific Rim has revealed a long and complex history of human occupation, dynamic human-environmental interactions, and – above all - underscores the relevance of archaeology to people living across the region today. These developments span the nearly two decades of Dr....


Archaeology and NAGPRA in Alaska: Examples of Intentional Excavation (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rhea Hood. Rachel Mason.

This is an abstract from the "Beyond Collections: Federal Archaeology and "New Discoveries" under NAGPRA" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Intentional excavation of human remains and associated items subject to NAGPRA occurs rarely. Such excavations are only permitted under particular circumstances and only with approval of lineal descendants (as appropriate) and affiliated tribes. In Alaska, National Park Service staff have facilitated...


The Archaeology of a Russian Period Alutiiq Work Camp on Kodiak Island, Alaska (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amy Margaris. Mark Rusk. Patrick Saltonstall. Molly Odell.

The site of Mikt’sqaq Angayuk (KOD-014) on eastern Kodiak Island provides an intimate view of Native Alutiiq responses to the colonial labor regime imposed by 19th century Russians in Alaska. Recent excavation of KOD-014 through the Alutiiq Museum’s Community Archaeology Program revealed a well-preserved Alutiiq style sod house and associated faunal midden dating to the 1830s. The midden was rich in cod remains, and the artifacts comprised mostly colonially-introduced products including metal...


The archaeology of dogs at the precontact Yup’ik site of Nunalleq, Western Alaska (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kate Britton. Edouard Masson-Maclean. Ellen McManus-Fry. Claire Houmard. Carly Ameen.

Historically and ethnographically dogs have played a prominent role in the lifeways and lifeworlds of many Arctic and sub-Arctic peoples, and are considered to be a vital aspect of adaptation to living in these regions, providing protection, fur and meat, as well as aiding hunting and transportation. Excavations at the precontact site of Nunalleq in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta in coastal Western Alaska have uncovered a significant proportion of dog bones amongst the faunal assemblage. The presence...


Arctic Heterotopias: Qariyit as Queer Spaces In Precontact Inuit Communities (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Peter Whitridge.

Gender and landscape have each proved to be such powerful archaeological tropes that thinking them together seems sure to yield interesting results. In the precontact Inuit world, gender and related dimensions of embodiment were key axes of spatial practice and place-based identification. Women’s and men’s activities were differently distributed across the landscape – in general, women occupying and managing domestic and near-community spaces, and men employing watercraft and dogs to operate...


Arctic Horizons: Forging Priorities for Arctic Social Sciences and NSF Funding (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shelby Anderson. Colleen Strawhacker. Aaron Presnall. Arctic Horizons Steering Committee.

This is an abstract from the "Celebrating Anna Kerttula's Contributions to Northern Research" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Arctic Horizons – a multi-institution collaboration funded through NSF's Arctic Social Science program – brought together the Arctic social science research community to reassess goals, potentials, and needs affecting the diverse disciplinary and transdisciplinary currents of social science research in the circumpolar North...


Arctic Steam: HMS Pioneer and the Technology of the Search for Franklin (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mara A Deckinga.

In mid-nineteenth century Britain, the dramatic disappearance of Sir John Franklin and his men led to a large-scale search conducted throughout the Arctic by sailing ships and steamers.  The rescue expeditions, conducted over a twelve-year span, highlight the shift from reliance on sail to the prevalence of steam during this period.  HMS Pioneer (formerly the merchant Eider), was built as a topsail schooner with oscillating steam engine, and later outfitted as part of an Arctic squadron.  The...


Beach Level Chronology and Paleodemography at Alarniq, Northern Foxe Basin, Arctic Canada (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lesley Howse. James Savelle. Arthur Dyke.

In this paper we discuss beach level chronology and settlement at Alarniq—the ‘type-site’ for Dorset culture history and one of the largest Dorset archaeological sites in the Eastern Arctic. The Dorset occupation at the site extends approximately 3 km along a succession of raised gravel beach ridges, ranging in elevation between 8 to 24 m asl, and is almost entirely comprised of semi-subterranean structures that would have been occupied during the cold season. The number of houses varies across...


Beyond a Record of Environmental Change: The Influence of Variability in Peat Composition on the Archaeological Record in Viking Age Iceland (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alicia Sawyer.

Research suggests non-woody resources, such as peat, can serve as unique repositories of environmental change. This paper discusses how peat serves such a role, and sheds light on the how these processes affect the archaeological record, an aspect of environmental change that has been overlooked. During the colonization of Iceland in the 9th century AD, early Icelanders (Vikings) began to affect and be affected by local environments. Viking colonization led to rapid deforestation of woodland...


Beyond Binaries: Queering the Archaeological Record of the Western Canadian Arctic (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebecca Goodwin. Lisa Hodgetts.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Queer theory is often equated with sexuality research in archaeology (Blackmore 2011), but a queering of the archaeological record actually allows us to challenge all aspects of (hetero)normativity in archaeological practice (Croucher 2005; Blackmore 2011). Queer is "whatever is at odds with the normal, legitimate and the dominant" (Halperin 1995:62), and it...


Birnirk and Thule Pottery: Analysis of Arctic Ceramics from Inuigniq (Cape Espenberg), Alaska (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick Reed. Shelby Anderson. Caelie Butler.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. We are conducting a multi-year (2009-2018), multi-disciplinary research project at Inuigniq (Cape Espenberg) to explore changing patterns of human occupation, culture change, and environmental conditions in Northwest Alaska. Our current focus is on the emergence of Birnirk archaeological culture ca. AD 1000, and the question of how Birnirk culture factored...


The Birth of Economic Woman (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Liam Frink. Celeste Giordano.

Modern humans have been living in the Arctic for over 30,000 years and their ability to adapt to the ecological limitations and challenges is relevant to questions of human adaptation and evolution. However, we know very little about the actual technologies and nutritional implications that were necessary to develop in the northern latitudes. Here we focus on two aspects of Arctic dietary practices that are little understood in the literature and yet would have been essential to successful...


Bone Artifacts from Summer Bay, Unalaska (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kaitlin Stanley.

Situated in Alaska’s eastern Aleutian Islands on Unalaska Island, the Summer Bay site dates to 2,000 years BP. Over 700 osseous objects representing various manufacture and use stages have been recovered. Among these are harpoons, fish hooks, labrets, points, wedges, awls, and needles. These are primarily made from sea mammals and avifauna. Although Summer Bay represents one of the most secure dates of the Amaknak Phase (3,000 to 1,000 years BP), minimal research has been done to better...


The Book Antler on the Sea and Community Perspectives from Sireniki, Anna’s Home Village in Chukotka, Russia (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sveta Yamin-Pasternak. Igor Pasternak.

This is an abstract from the "Celebrating Anna Kerttula's Contributions to Northern Research" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Nearly three decades after her dissertation fieldwork in the village of Sireniki, which she conducted in the late Soviet period, anthropologist Anna Kerttula de Echave continues to be closely entangled within the life and social relationships of the community. In many Sireniki households, Anna’s book 'Antler on the Sea: the...


Building a Database to Understand the Architecture of Arctic Wooden House Remains (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Remi Mereuze. T. Max Friesen.

Western Arctic archaeological sites hold the remains of wooden houses occupied during the second millennium AD by ancestors of the present Inuit people. Although the permafrost helps to maintain these features in excellent condition, the giant puzzle resulting from the collapse of the frame makes it hard to understand their original architecture. During the ArcticCHAR project, we excavated a house at Kuukpak (Northwest Territories, Canada) in 2014 and 2016. Facing the complexity of this feature,...


Centering Alluitsoq: The Potential for an Indigenous Archaeology in Greenland (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Cameron Turley.

Postcolonial and Indigenous archaeologies have changed the theoretical, methodological, and political landscapes of our discipline’s engagement with regions and peoples once conceptualized as peripheral to the European core. However, some regions, and the subjects that move within them, still occupy the conceptual margins. This paper considers the position of archaeological praxes in Greenland, a constituent of the Kingdom of Denmark, and the late arrival of the postcolonial critique to...


Clearing the Fog: Contributions to Central Aleutian Island Archaeology (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Diane Hanson.

This is an abstract from the "Celebrating Anna Kerttula's Contributions to Northern Research" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeological survey and excavation on Adak Island, Aleutian archipelago, Alaska were funded by NSF through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The chance NSF and Anna Kerttula took on a small project in a remote location with a small crew had an unexpected and significant effect on the understanding of...


Climate Change and the Rapid Loss of Organic Deposits in West Greenland (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hans Harmsen. Jørgen Hollesen. Henning Matthiesen. Bo Eberling. Christian Koch Madsen.

The REMAINS (REsearch and Management of Archaeological sites IN a changing environment and Society) of Greenland project has explored a number of factors that currently threaten Greenland’s archaeological landscape in the coming decades. This paper reviews recent work as well as the problems and threats to coastal and inland middens along the country’s West coast and adjacent inner fjord systems. Information gathered in recent years provides a baseline for "ground-truthing" predictive models of...


Climate Change, Capacity-Building and Local Engagement: Report on the 2018 Arctic Viking Field School, Vatnahverfi, South Greenland (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hans Harmsen. Christian Koch Madsen. Elie Pinta. Michael Nielsen.

This is an abstract from the "Accelerating Environmental Change Threats to Cultural Heritage: Serious Challenges, Promising Responses" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Eastern Arctic is currently observed to be undergoing significant environmental change as a direct consequence of global warming. For archaeologists working in Greenland, this means the rapid and complete loss of cultural remains due to changing soil conditions. As annual...


Coastal Geocatastrophes as Agents of Change on Multiple Time Scales: A Case Study from the Shetland Islands, UK (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gerald F. Bigelow. Michael E. Jones. Casey Oehler.

The coasts of northernmost Britain and neighboring North Sea countries offer numerous examples of sand environments that have been both settled and completely abandoned by humans at various times. These areas' rich archaeological records reveal many examples of once-thriving human settlements that were challenged and eventually terminated by burial in aeolian sand over periods ranging from days to decades. The origins and socio-ecological dynamics of these geocatastrophes may reflect important...