Communities of Practice (Other Keyword)

1-25 (75 Records)

"Across the Agua to Managua" and Beyond: Getting Past Migration in Nicaraguan Prehistory (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Larry Steinbrenner.

Despite being the largest country in Central America, Nicaragua’s archaeological record remains the least explored and most ignored. One consequence of this is that reconstructions of Nicaragua’s prehistory have tended to rely overmuch on rather sparse (and not necessarily reliable) ethnohistoric accounts in which migration from Mesoamerican homelands is heavily emphasized, generally to the detriment of other kinds of cultural phenomena, including indigenous developments that are not explicitly...


After Dark: The Nocturnal Urban Landscape of Great Zimbabwe (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shadreck Chirikure. Munyaradzi Manyanga. Genius Tevera.

This is an abstract from the "After Dark: The Nocturnal Urban Landscape & Lightscape of Ancient Cities" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. What was night life like at Great Zimbabwe? While this question excites imagination in numerous ways, in fact and myth, not much is known about nocturnal life in this ancient African urban landscape. Most archaeological reconstructions of urban life at Great Zimbabwe create the erroneous impression that the...


Ancestral Pueblo Essentials: Evidence for Layered Social Institutions during the Basketmaker III Period in the Northern Southwest (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shanna Diederichs.

This is an abstract from the "Adopting the Pueblo Fettle: The Breadth and Depth of the Basketmaker III Cultural Horizon" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. A range of evidence suggests that the Ancestral Pueblo tradition of the northern Southwest crystallized during the Basketmaker III period in the sixth and seventh centuries A.D. As farming was adopted and populations expanded, social problems related to conflict mitigation, land tenure, and private...


Assessing the Suitability of Southern Africa for Archaeological Provenance Studies with Lead Isotopes (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jay Stephens. David Killick.

Evidence for trade between southern Africa and the Muslim world dates back to the 8th century CE. However, it is not until the 12th and 13th centuries, with the discovery of alluvial gold in southern Africa, that entanglement between the two regions intensified. As a result, state-level societies emerged and began incorporating aspects of the Muslim identity into their own culture. With the intensification of these trade relations, craftsmen began expanding their repertoire of iron and copper...


Attaining Goals Together: Collaborative Heritage Resource Stewardship and the Forest Service (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Stephens.

This is an abstract from the "Wait Wait, Don’t Tell Me: What Have We Learned Over the Past 40 Years and How Do We Address Future Challenges" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Passage of federal environmental laws during the 1960’s forced otherwise autonomous bureaucracies to accept professions into their ranks that previously had no place. Public lands agencies like the Forest Service were required to employ archaeologists once the National Historic...


Authority via Mobility: Interpreting Yamasee Ceramics (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick Johnson.

Yamasees worked as non-missionized laborers in Spanish Florida, raided for Charleston traders, fought to expand Georgia, lived with Creek Indians, and worked as diplomats and traders in Pensacola. Letters, speeches, and testimony demonstrate that this mobility— often leading them to outnumber local occupants— allowed Yamasees to dictate terms to and take vengeance against other Native Americans as well as Europeans. Despite such authority, pottery assemblages demonstrate the frequent adoption of...


Beads and Bohr Models: Using XRF to Discuss Choctaw Identity Formation (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin Wright.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper presents the results of a study that uses x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to examine European glass trade beads from the Chickasawhay Creek Sites (22KE630 & 22KE718) in Kemper County, Mississippi. Together, these two sites present a unique opportunity to examine Choctaw ethnogenesis. Although a combination of archaeological and ethnohistorical research has...


Blue Birds and Black Glass: Traditions and Communities of Practice during the Coalition to Classic Period Transition on the Pajarito Plateau, New Mexico (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sean Dolan.

Multiple lines of anthropological evidence demonstrate people moved from the northern San Juan region into the Pajarito Plateau in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries A.D. This Coalition to Classic period transition was a time of immense demographic and social reorganization that shaped the historical and cultural trajectories for future of Ancestral Pueblo people. As a consequence of the influx of diasporic households, how did this transformation affect traditions of obsidian...


Casma Occupation at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña: Findings from the 2017 and 2018 PIAPAN Field Seasons (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jenna Hurtubise.

This is an abstract from the "Casma State Material Culture and Society: Organizing, Analyzing, and Interpreting Archaeological Evidence of a Re-emergent Ancient Polity" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In 1968 and 1973, Donald Proulx conducted surface surveys of the Nepeña Valley, registering sites spanning different time periods and cultural occupations. One of these sites, registered as PV31-29, is Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, a Casma site consisting...


Chupadero Black-on-white: Communities of Practice, Identity, and Memory (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Leon Natker.

Since the beginning of archeological research, style has been used to characterize and define numerous aspects of social interaction and complexity, including communities of practice which structure ways in which elements of material culture are transmitted. The persistent transmission of knowledge through time and space implies a long lived community of practice. Chupadero Black-on-white, produced in central and southeast New Mexico, was possibly the longest lived of all the Black-on-white...


Co-Creating Digital Heritage Resources in Ghana: How Is It Going? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann Stahl.

This is an abstract from the "Capacity Building or Community Making? Training and Transitions in Digital Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Funded by a Canadian SSHRC-funded partnership development grant, our working group of collaborators is engaged in training and capacity building in digital heritage methods in Ghana. Project aims include fostering a community of practice inclusive of archaeologists, heritage practitioners, students...


Communities of Engaged Performance: Investigating Soundscapes and the Sonorous Past (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katrina Kosyk.

The relationship between individuals and urban soundscapes can tell us about the personhood and sonic practices of people in the past. To reconstruct the interaction between a musician and audience in archaeological contexts, I introduce a novel theoretical framework called ‘communities of engaged performance’ (CEP). CEP is defined as the transmission of knowledge through performance resulting in variable group-specific sound practices. CEP is derived and builds upon theories of ‘communities of...


Communities of Practice and Corrugated Pottery at Chevelon Ruin (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Claire Barker.

During the A.D. 1200s and 1300s, the Colorado Plateau experienced widespread, large-scale migration and the subsequent aggregation of groups into large Pueblo communities. During this period, people migrated to the Homol'ovi area, aggregating into seven large pueblo settlements. The demographic upheaval resulting from this large-scale population movement brought diverse individual and group identities into contact and, potentially, conflict. Chevelon Ruin, one of the aggregated settlements that...


Communities of Practice and Sequencing from Older Caribbean Collections in the NMAI and NMNH (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Vernon Knight.

The Caribbean holdings of the National Museum of the American Indian and the Anthropology Department of the National Museum of Natural History contain material from historically important early excavations like those of M. R. Harrington in eastern Cuba in 1915 and Herbert W. Krieger in the Dominican Republic in 1928. Moreover, they include the results of early collection efforts by such luminaries as Jesse W. Fewkes and Theodor de Booy, which means that they contain some of the key specimens...


Communities of practice and variability/standardization of the ceramic assemblages: the indigenous people Asurini do Xingu (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Fabiola Silva.

I intend to present some results of my ethnoarchaeological research (1996-2016) on the ceramic technology of the Asurini do Xingu, an Amazonian indigenous people (Tupi-Guarani linguistic family) who lives on the banks of the Xingu River - Pará, Brazil. Based on collected data, I will demonstrate the relationship between the social organization of ceramic production and the standardization/variability of these artifacts over time. I will show how in Asurini context, teaching-learning framework,...


The Complex Community of Cerén, El Salvador: a Classic Maya Example of Heterogeneity (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christine C. Dixon. Payson Sheets.

The Loma Caldera eruption of c. AD 660 dramatically buried a sophisticated community built by craftspeople, architects, religious specialists, political leaders, and agriculturalists. As people fled for their lives, they left behind belongings and buildings. Results from decades of archaeological research at Cerén, El Salvador and in the surrounding Zapotitán Valley challenges an ethnocentric, over-simplified reconstruction of ancient socio-political organization. Cerén was not in the middle of...


Constructing Communities: A New Magnetometry Survey at the John Chapman Site (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Leslie Drane.

The John Chapman site is a mounded village that lies along the Apple River in northwestern Illinois. At approximately A.D. 1050, it appears that Mississippian migrants traveled to the area and interacted with the Late Woodland people already occupying the land. Previous excavations in the northern portion of the site revealed John Chapman people changing their ceramics to emulate Mississippian styles, while keeping their houses Late Woodland-like. Recent magnetometry surveys targeted central and...


Consumerism on the Margins: Shop Ledgers and Materialized Social Status in Coastal Co. Galway, Ireland. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Meredith S Chesson. Sara Morrow. Erin Gibbons.

In contrast to the marginality ascribed to Western Ireland during the 19th and 20th centuries, islanders’ and coastal mainlanders’ participated in transnational trade networks expressed through everyday material decision-making, seasonal and intermittent international interactions, and ideologies of social status. Historically, coastal communities in Western Ireland have been characterized as marginalized and geographically isolated from participation in mainstream consumerism and national and...


Convergence of Tears at Momonga: Spiritual, Social and Personal Interactions of the Multiethnic Mourning Ceremony (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin Ripley. Laura Dzvonick. Tina Nupuf. Noble Eisenlauer. Ronald Faulseit.

The village of Momonga (Ca-LAn-357) is located in the San Fernando Valley of Southern California, along the pre-Columbian boundaries of multiple ethnic groups. Rock art in the area indicates ritual activities involving people from various cultural traditions, including ancestral Chumash, Tongva, Yokuts, and Tataviam peoples. Excavations in a portion of the site have produced exchange and utilitarian items, such as shell beads, stone beads, amulets, stone bowls, hammer stones, pressure flakes,...


Cultivation and Herding Practices, Fiber Colors and Textile Styles in the Paracas-Nasca Transition (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann Peters.

Improving documentation of artifact assemblages in the funerary contexts of the Necropolis of Wari Kayan (Paracas site, south coast of the Central Andes) leads to identification of multiple contemporary textile styles as well as their transformation over the period of cemetery use (c. 250 BCE to 250 CE). While artifact variability in the region has largely been organized in hypothetical phases, expanded data on garment design and production details, as well as imagery, is most usefully organized...


DEBS: Using Digital Tools in Community-Led Graveyard Recording (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Julian Richards. Nicole Beale. Gareth Beale. Katie Green.

This is an abstract from the "Capacity Building or Community Making? Training and Transitions in Digital Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Discovering England’s Burial Spaces (www.debs.ac.uk) is an Historic England-funded project based at the Archaeology Data Service and Digital Creativity Labs in the University of York, UK. We are collaborating with community groups to develop new tools and resources for burial space research, recording...


Depositional Practice and Ancestral Presence at Edye Point (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Darcy Mathews.

On the southernmost tip of Vancouver Island, between 400–1500 calA.D., the Straits Salish peoples built distinctive funerary petroforms for their ancestral dead. These above ground features, constructed in a patterned array of sizes and shapes, were the material and spatial outcome of ritualized depositional practices. The Edye Point Cemetery, the largest funerary petroform cemetery in the region, has more than 300 of these features concentrated in a three hectare area. There is a recursive and...


Digital Archaeology Mentorship: Best Practices in a Rapidly Changing Field (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Willeke Wendrich.

This is an abstract from the "Capacity Building or Community Making? Training and Transitions in Digital Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Digital archaeology comprises everything from obtaining digital data, to data analysis, representation, and preservation. It is a complex field that is in constant flux, due to the ever changing landscape of available commercial, home grown and open access resources. Training and mentorship are of...


Diné łe’saa łitsxo bik'ah dash chá’ii dajíi la: Navajo Gobernador Polychrome Pottery (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Timothy Wilcox.

This is an abstract from the "Nat’aah Nahane’ Bina’ji O’hoo’ah: Diné Archaeologists & Navajo Archaeology in the 21st Century" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Gobernador Polychrome is a Navajo ceramic practice whose development was hastened by participation in the Pueblo Revolt. It represents a visible change in Navajo ceramic technology and a window into their social history. My discussions, in this paper are not aligned with Navajo...


A Dynamic Past: The Prehistoric Interactions on the Plain Project (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Danielle Riebe. János Dani.

The collaborative, American-Hungarian Prehistoric Interactions on the Plain Project explores the past through the reconstruction of interactions. Investigations on interactions as an active mode of social investment and social construction challenges normative concepts of "culture" by modeling socio-cultural boundaries as a dynamic and negotiated process, as opposed to a static categorically assigned social unit. Moreover, our research contextualizes regional developments as the result of...