collaboration (Other Keyword)

1-25 (50 Records)

Applying North American Approaches to Community Archaeology in Khirbet al-Mukhayyat, Jordan (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer Lewis.

"Community based" archaeology programs are all the rage in North America, as both academic and consulting archaeologists respond to descendant communities’ rights to management over their cultural heritage in the face of large-scale development and resource management. This movement is not yet applied in other regions facing similar challenges of economic development opportunities and access to heritage. The Khirbet al-Mukhayyat Community Archaeology Program (KMCAP) is inspired by North...


Archaeological Collaboration in North America: Are "Benefits" to American Indian Communities truly being maximized? (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicholas Laluk. Sarah Cowie. Ben Curry.

With the continued evolution of collaborative archaeological projects between American Indian communities and archaeologists in North America archaeologists are constantly speculating ways in which their research will benefit American Indian communities. However, do archaeological research goals and agendas truly and positively contribute to the wants and needs of tribal communities involved? This paper examines various case studies in reference to collaborative archaeological projects in North...


Archaeology In The (Political) Trenches: Lessons From Charm City (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren E Schiszik.

This paper will cover the rise, fall, and current rise of archaeology in Baltimore. "Charm City" serves as a case-study to explore the political, social, and temporal factors that alter the levels of archaeological stewardship at the local goverment level. The establishment of the Baltimore Center for Urban Archaeology in 1983 marked Baltimore as a forerunner in urban public archaeology. This innovative program led excavations that engaged thousands of people until it closed due to city-wide...


#arrowheads: Instagram as a Creative, Social Media-Based Approach to Public Archaeology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Lynch.

Social media is a hot topic of discussion and innovation among archaeologists. Although we've improved our ability to digitally reach wider audiences, "social media" is not a single entity. Each platform is different: purposes, user bases, and means of connection vary widely. As archaeologists, we must be proactive about fully understanding these differences, in order to find the most effective ways use each platform and reach a greater public. This paper provides an example of one way to...


Attimoni (ah-jee-MOOUHN) – The Stories We Have to Tell: relationships among the Meskwaki Nation, tribes with historic ties to Iowa, and the Iowa Office of the State Archaeologist (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lara Noldner. Shirley Schermer. Suzanne Buffalo. Johnathan Buffalo.

A long-standing relationship has existed between the University of Iowa Office of the State Archaeologist (OSA) and tribal entities including the Meskwaki Nation. The precedent-setting burial law established in Iowa in 1976, 14 years prior to the passage of NAGPRA, has long required equal treatment and reburial of Native American remains. The law gave the OSA statutory authority for upholding the law and established the OSA Indian Advisory Council (IAC). Maria Pearson (Yankton Sioux) and Donald...


Bridging the Gap Between CRM and Academia: A Potential Model (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle A. Slaughter. Karin Larkin.

In general, State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPO) designed guidelines and timelines for compliance projects that mitigate cultural resources potentially impacted by proposed development. These purposes are fundamentally different from those of academic work and field schools, which focus on theory based interpretation and field techniques. Yet academic field schools are designed to prepare students for a professional life beyond their undergraduate career and for most that means working in...


Co-practice amongst Non-Western Peoples: Abandoning Theory at Center Stage (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Peter Schmidt.

Theory as Western performance in archaeology has hogged center stage so long that other actors standing in the wings ready to play their roles are not included in the drama. Indigenous theories of knowledge have been relegated to permanent off-stage status. Yet those who have had the privilege to work with and collaborate with historically-minded counterparts in other cultures have incrementally accumulated local beliefs and have, both consciously and unconsciously, woven local epistemologies...


Collaboration Continues: Revisiting Archaeology between CRM Archaeologists and First Nations Communities in the Pacific Northwest (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephanie Huddlestan. Amanda Marshall.

First Nation’s heritage concerns are at the forefront of many large-scale and controversial development projects across the province of British Columbia. How developers and Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Archaeologists choose to address these concerns can significantly impact working and political relationships. CRM archaeologists are on the front lines balancing and navigating complex, and sensitive socio-political heritage issues. Our small CRM company, Kleanza Consulting Ltd. (Kleanza),...


Collaborative and Community-based Archaeology (Heritage) – Introduction to the Session and Some Views on Successfully Partnering with Indigenous and Local Communities. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles Bello.

The concept of conducting research & historic preservation endeavors in effective partnerships with indigenous and local communities just makes sense and is only fair. Clearly, archaeology – heritage management impacts indigenous, local, and descendant communities. It is also clear that these groups often have relatively little input to what others are trying to accomplish. This paper addresses a few key concepts and recurring purposes and goals: The tangible and intangible aspects of...


Collaborative Archaeology As Punk Archaeology? Considerations From The Maya Region (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Rowe.

The punk ethos is alive and well in collaborative archaeology, even if it is rarely acknowledged. Like punk, collaborative archaeology is committed to social change, minimally by giving voice to and enabling the participation of previously marginalized people in archaeological investigations. The types of on-the-ground operations involved with collaborative projects take more time and resources, and can be slower to produce the types of insights common in more traditional approaches to...


Collaborative Archaeology at the Gage and Cheney Houses (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kim Christensen.

Studies of reformers and the sites associated with them provide an opportunity to examine how people in the past sought to better their world and in turn, powerfully connect to contemporary efforts to reform society.  In this paper, I detail the collaborative archaeological projects undertaken at two sites associated with female reformers – Matilda Joslyn Gage and May Cheney – noting the ways in which non-hierarchical, feminist-inspired research practices were employed in attempts to connect...


Community Archaeology and Collaborative Interpretation at a Rosenwald School (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Love. Emma Mason.

Of more than 5,000 Rosenwald Schools built during the 20th century in the southern United States, the Fairview School in Cave Spring, Georgia was constructed to provide an educational facility for the local African-American community. Following the site’s rediscovery in 2009, the local Cave Spring community and alumni of Fairview have spearheaded efforts to preserve and interpret Fairview’s historic campus. Most of the buildings located on the Fairview campus were demolished, originally...


Counter-Archaeology: Blending Critical Race Theory and Community-Based Participatory Research (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Marc Lorenc.

Exploring connections between critical race theory (CRT) and community-based participatory research (CBPR), the methodology outlined in this paper examines how archaeology can be both transformative and empowering through its involvement in civic engagement, critical pedagogy, and social activism. The paper examines various ways in which CRT can broaden our conception of materiality, accountability, inclusion, and collaboration through an analysis of systemic inequality and its varied effects on...


The Countless Perceptions of Archaeology in Archaeological Societies: A Case Study Involving the Oklahoma Anthropological Society (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Holly Andrew.

The public has a genuine interest in archaeology of which avocational and amateur archaeological groups are among the most vocal. The greatest area of interest among avocationalists is in participating in archaeological research, which has led eight states to develop and implement archaeology certification programs. These program are designed to train avocationals on how to contribute to the professional field and laboratory projects. However, while these state certification programs seek to...


Decolonizing the Practice of Archaeology through Collaboration and Community Engagement: Successes, Failures, and Lessons Learned (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather N Atherton. Kelly M Britt.

Collaboration or Consultation—while both terms involve working with stakeholders; consultation implies a formulaic, reactionary response or product that can produce negative connotations. In contrast,collaboration suggests a voluntary, shared method and a mutual goal, invoking more positive associations.  Within archaeology, collaboration is not a new practice.  Yet the task of decolonizing the practice of archaeology within academia and the public sector is easier said than done.  Through...


The Dragonfly Petroglyph Site: A teaching place for us all (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Toney. Marilyn Markel.

The dragonfly is a subject of intrigue around the world and many different cultures have ascribed unique meanings to its behaviors. The Dragonfly petroglyph site located on the Gila National Forest represents an interesting teaching place for cultural preservation and traditional values and beliefs. It also demonstrates the collaborative opportunities for the interpretation of this special place. Collaborative efforts between the Gila National Forest, Aldo Leopold High School, New Mexico...


Dungeons and Virtual Tours: Preserving the Mazmorras of Tetouan, Morocco (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only R Hussey.

New and economical methods of digital preservation have enabled archaeologists to both protect and increase public access to threatened heritage sites. Recent plans to rehabilitate a long sealed but structurally threatened subterranean dungeon associated with Christian slavery, The Mazmorras of Tetouan, Morocco, provided an ideal location to integrate cost-effective methods of digital preservation with municipal restoration proposals. The creation of an online virtual tour with moderately priced...


Exploring Landscapes of Political Violence through Collaborative Archaeology (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tiffany C. Cain.

How does political violence impact civilian spaces and how can we rethink its consequences for everyday life? The Tihosuco Heritage Preservation and Community Development Project has used collaborative archaeology to grapple with the postconflict landscapes of Quintana Roo, Mexico. Our most recent work focuses specifically on an 18th-19th century town, called Tela, whose fortified houselots, roadblocks, and assemblages offer evidence of the early years (1847-1866) of the Caste War or Maya Social...


Field Walking and Walking the Field (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Conkey.

While we have gradually accepted that archaeological survey is as integral to our research as the overly-valued practice of excavation, the emotional dimensions of survey where one connects with the landscapes and with its occupants are hardly discussed, especially in the case of long-term surveys. What does a heart-centered survey project look like? How does the intimacy that comes from field walking inform the archaeology? As well, we are all participants in the field of archaeology, and...


Finding the Balance: Case Studies in Collaboration and Community Engagement from the American Southwest (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Schollmeyer. Suzanne Eckert. Deborah Huntley.

In this paper we explore the challenges and benefits of conducting archaeological field work in rural communities where many stakeholders have vested interests in our research. Doing work in such situations can often feel like a complicated juggling act as one seeks to build relationships with local landowners, diverse community members, and various government agencies, while at the same time meeting the needs of student participants and achieving research goals. The benefits to all parties,...


Four Years of Passport in Time: Public Archaeology and Professional Collaboration in a Nevada Ghost Town (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily S. Dale.

From 2011 to 2014, Dr. Carolyn White and Emily Dale of the University of Nevada-Reno and Fred Frampton and Eric Dillingham of the USFS collaborated on a series of Passport in Time projects in the historic mining town of Aurora, Nevada. The dozens of PIT volunteers who participated throughout the years came from a variety of backgrounds and for myriad reasons, yet all left with a connection to the past and an understanding of the importance of protecting America’s archaeological heritage. By...


From Consultation to Collaboration: Expanding the Scope of Archeology's Engagement with Indigenous People (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lindsay Montgomery.

Consultation with descendant communities is now a widely accepted reality of doing archeology in North America. Since the passing of NAGPRA twenty-five years ago a robust body of scholarship has developed around the methodological and theoretical aspects of consulting with indigenous communities. Although many scholars today point out the need for "collaboration" in addition to "consultation" the constraints of archeological research and tribal politics often make true collaboration difficult....


Gazing at the Horizon: The NAGPRA Stories Yet to be Told (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren Sieg.

What will NAGPRA look like in 25 or 50 years? The horizon is constantly shifting; it looks bright and dark, clear and complicated. Social research on the first generation of archaeologists to emerge after the passage of NAGPRA suggests that NAGPRA will remain relevant and important. At the same time, the increased diversity of this generation and an emerging post-racial world will challenge the concept of identity that lies at the heart of NAGPRA. Digital technologies will provide new methods...


Gender, Masculinity, and Professional-Avocational Heritage Collaborations (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Siobhan Hart.

Relationships among professional and avocational archaeologists have changed in the last few decades with the increase in collaborative heritage projects worldwide. Professionals and avocationals often work side-by-side on archaeological sites, collaborate on research, and engage in mutual knowledge sharing. However, little attention has been paid to the gendered dimensions of these relationships. Feminist critiques of research and practices within professional archaeology, along with...


A Generous Spirit (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Harris.

This paper offers a reflection on Jerry Kennedy’s manifold contributions to the Department of Anthropology at Florida Atlantic University and their continuing influence a decade past his retirement. These contributions include his work on the archaeology of south Florida and elsewhere, the training of students at both undergraduate and graduate levels, the creation of programs, and the lending of his administrative acumen to department causes. Jerry’s work as an archaeologist has been...