digital archaeology (Other Keyword)

1-25 (146 Records)

10 Years, 3 Supervisors, 7 Assistants and 30 Students. How the Iowa Office of the State Archaeologist Managed, Manages and Plans for the Future of Archaeological Data (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary De La Garza.

Sustainable accessible data storage is as important to archaeologists as tractors are to farmers. In 2001 the Iowa Office of the State Archaeologist, (OSA), was archiving 20GB of data on a 100GB server. Sixteen years later the office is serving 32TB on several server systems and plans are in place to archive 60TB over the next 4 years. In addition to space needs the office must also make this data in its many forms accessible to outside entities. In the not so distant past archaeologists...


3D Comparison of Attic Head Vases (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dirk Rieke-Zapp. Elisabeth Trinkl.

Several hundred attic head vases are known worldwide and stored in museums and collections. In 1929, Beazley has categorized twenty groups based on stylistic properties and historic methodology. Head vases are assembled in several steps, most important for our comparison is the moulding of the head area. Since moulds were used to shape the heads, our initial hypothesis was to perform a quantitative comparison of head shapes based on digital scan data. Comparison of scan data is straight forward...


Adding Lasers to the Archaeological Toolkit: The Costs and Benefits of Terrestrial LiDAR in Digital Archaeology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia G Markert. Benjamin Skolnik. Stefan F. Woehlke.

In recent years, companies such as FARO and CyArk have begun incorporating 3D laser scanners into field-ready packages.  Archaeologists have successfully employed these new 3D laser-scanning techniques to record sites such as Mount Rushmore and Merv in modern-day Turkmenistan.  Despite the potential benefits of using this technology, which produces quickly scanned, high-resolution images of topography and features, several limitations have slowed it from entering the archaeologist’s standard...


ADS 3D Viewer: an example of open 3D real-time visualization system in archaeology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Fabrizio Galeazzi.

In this paper I will present ADS 3D Viewer, a project designed to develop a 3D real-time system for the management and analysis of archaeological data. The main aim of this interactive application is to give users the ability to access archaeological data to ground-truth interpretations. Thanks to the ADS 3D Viewer, in fact, multiple experts will share and analyse 3D replicas of the archaeological excavation record, which can be revisited and subject to new analytical techniques over the long...


Agelah and the Powershot: Digital Possibilities for Alternate Ways of Knowing in Archaeology (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Allison Mickel.

Digital recording methods offer a range of new means of collecting, organizing, and presenting archaeological information, which lead to new ways of thinking about the past. Capitalizing on the intuitive design of digital technologies additionally creates the potential for communities whose voices have been missing from the archaeological record to contribute their perspectives. In this paper, I draw upon my experiences experimenting with multimedia recording strategies at Petra, Jordan and at...


‘All things being equal’? Multiplex Material Networks of the Early Neolithic in the Near East (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Fiona Coward.

Archaeological network research typically relies on material culture similarities over space and time as a proxy for past social networks. In many cases, a range of different types of material culture are subsumed into reconstructed connections between nodes. However, not all forms of material culture are equal. Different types of objects may be caught up in rather different forms of social relationship – crudely put, ‘personal’ items such as jewellery may perhaps have more social and cultural...


Alternative Complexities in the Central Andes: An Anarchist Approach to Chancay Political Organization in the Huanangue Valley (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kasia Szremski.

Understanding the political organization of Late Intermediate Period (1000 – 1470 CE) societies along the central coast of Peru has remained challenging. The urban/proto-urban settlements that are characteristic of groups like the Chancay, Ichma, and the Chinca (among others) have been interpreted as material manifestations of elite power, however, many of these societies don’t fit traditional models of chiefdoms or states. Using a combination of ethnohistoric data, settlement pattern analysis,...


Always Halfway There: Keeping Up with Digital Archaeological Data in Virginia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jolene Smith.

Since being one of the first State Historic Preservation Offices to adopt electronic records management in the late ‘80s, the Virginia Department of Historic Resources has worked through several iterations of databases and web applications. These systems manage basic site information, details about physical collections, and now digital media and datasets themselves. Over time, the agency’s priorities and objectives surrounding digital records and data have evolved in ways common to other...


Analytical Models for At-Risk Heritage Conservation and 3D GIS (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Arianna Campiani. Nicola Lercari. Ashley Lingle.

In the period 2011-2017, scholars from the University of California Merced and Cardiff University recorded the fragile earthen architecture of Çatalhöyük, Turkey employing cutting-edge conservation technologies to monitor the site and gather new data. Our goal was to model and analyze the site decay and plan conservation interventions. Tools and methods for this initiative include blending site monitoring data and digital documentation data from environmental data loggers, terrestrial laser...


[AR]chaeology of El Presidio de San Francisco: Augmented Reality as a Public Interpretation Tool (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kari Lentz. Blake Vollmer. Diego Rocha. Claire Yancey. Edward DeHaro. Kari Jones. Liz Melicker.

Archaeologists have often eschewed technology as too expensive or superfluous for public outreach efforts. How can we as professionals overcome these long-held ideas and start to bring our projects into the digital age? This paper attempts to answer this question by examining how affordable cutting-edge technology can enhance public interpretation of archaeological resources. Augmented reality and 3D modeling were used in conjunction to visualize long-gone historical structures within the modern...


Archaeological Storytelling: Narrative Construction using Virtual Reality (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kacey Hadick.

Virtual reality (VR) is an exciting new medium for interactive storytelling and holds great promise as a way to raise awareness of heritage sites and the conservation challenges they face. VR can also be used as a way to provide virtual access to parts of an archaeological site that may be too sensitive for traditional tourism activities. In 2017, CyArk developed three virtual reality experiences of geographically diverse archaeological sites around the world that are being adversely impacted by...


The Archaeology of Mauritian Indentured Labor: Social Life and Death (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Julia Haines.

This paper provides a comparative case study for archaeological studies of slavery and indenture. I investigate the 19th century landscape and material culture of indentured laborers on the Bras d'Eau sugar estate in northeastern Mauritius, Indian Ocean. After emancipation, indentured laborers lived and worked within the same physical plantation landscapes as the enslaved individuals who came before them. However, Asian indentured laborers in Mauritius were immigrants and migrants: one-third...


Archaeology's Digital Interfaces (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeremy Huggett.

Computing devices have been increasingly used by archaeologists since the 1950s, their adoption accelerating significantly since the 1980s with the availability of personal computers. What is the nature of this changing relationship and what are the implications for archaeology (and computing)? These questions will be addressed through the metaphor of the interface. We are accustomed to the textual and graphical user interfaces as a means of negotiation between archaeologist and computer, but...


Archaeology, Accessibility and 3D Imaging (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hillary Kiazyk.

The recent incorporation of 3D imaging into the field of archaeology has opened many doors with regards to accessibility of archaeological materials. While this promotes research by inviting a much broader research discussion, it also poses questions of ownership of materials. This poster will explore new ways that archaeologists, descendant communities and people of the general public are now interacting with archaeological materials as well as some of the challenges, benefits and problems...


Are Inka Khipu Knots Anything More than Numbers?: A Computational Investigation (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jon Clindaniel.

Inka khipus--the knot and cord recording devices of the Andes--have been said to have recorded everything from accounting, to histories and songs. Leland Locke demonstrated in the 1920s that Inka khipu knots often have standard numerical values. However, non-numerical Inka khipu signs remain elusive and undeciphered. Recent work by Gary Urton, however, has identified Inka khipus and individual khipu cords with knots that do not obey the standard numerical rules Locke identified. May Inka khipu...


Are We Living in a Simulation? Digital Reconstructions of Early Sites in Coastal Peru (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily Milton. Kurt Rademaker. Peter Leach.

Rapidly evolving modern technology has resulted in powerful tools for preserving and visualizing archaeological materials. Extensively recording a site with digital technologies enables new explorations of site discovery and recovery processes while concurrently providing a permanent, detailed record of the material. Here, Terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene maritime sites in coastal Peru are reconstructed at various scales. Drone photography and GIS are utilized to collect high-resolution...


Are websites doing what we want them to do? Evaluating the effectiveness of websites for public archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lisa Catto. Virginia L. Butler. Kathi A. Ketcheson.

Archaeologists widely incorporate websites into public archaeology projects and rely on them as primary vehicles for connecting with the non-archaeologist public for many reasons: they are relatively inexpensive to create, adaptable to most any content, and potentially accessed by a global population. While websites have great potential for advancing public understanding of the human past, to date there has been little consideration of what makes a “good” public archaeology website. Our project...


Artifact Ubiquity as an Index of Ancient Maya Socioeconomic Variability at Actuncan, Belize (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Wade Tidwell.

The Actuncan Archaeological Project has conducted ten field seasons of research at this ancient lowland Maya site in Belize, Central America and inventoried all artifact classes including ceramics, lithics, marine shell, jade, daub, etc. from excavation contexts. One of my research goals was to consolidate this information into a relational Access database so that project members could more easily analyze artifacts across contexts and time periods. The database allowed me to construct...


Assessing the Effectiveness of Various Scanning Technologies in Digitally Capturing Fingerprints on Corrugated Wares (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lindsay Shepard.

Methodological advances in the study of fingerprints by criminologists have revived an interest in using dermatoglyphic evidence to conduct archaeological research. The analysis of fingerprint impressions left in ceramics is being used to investigate topics such as craft specialization and social organization. While most impressions left in ceramics lack the completeness needed to identify individual potters, fragmentary prints can be used to analyze things such as ridge density. Given a large...


At-Risk World Heritage and the Digital Humanities – An Overview of the UC Office of the President’s Research Catalyst Project (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Thomas E. Levy. Margie Burton.

Recent current events have dramatically highlighted the vulnerability of the world's material cultural heritage. Funded by a University of California (UC) Office of the President’s Research Catalyst grant beginning in 2016, the At-Risk Cultural Heritage and the Digital Humanities project catalyzes a collaborative research effort by four UC campuses (San Diego, Berkeley, Los Angeles and Merced) to use cyber-archaeology and computer graphics to document and safeguard virtually some of the most...


Automatic Classification of Digital Images of Archaeological Arrowheads (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Fernando Castillo Flores. Francisco Javier García Ugalde. José Luis Punzo Díaz. Alfonso Gastelum-Strozzi. Dante Bernardo Martinez Vazquez.

Currently there exist several databases composed of hundreds or thousands of digital images of arrowheads made by different ancient ethnic groups around the world. Extracting information or comparing and classifying the elements of these databases in an efficient and automated way, even without the need of arrowhead’s metadata, would be of great help in carrying out a comprehensive study on this archaeological subject. This work deals with this problem by developing an image processing...


The Benefits of B Corps for Building Sustainable Social Enterprises in Archaeology (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Ashley. Chris Webster. Ruth Tringham.

Within the slender margins of academic archaeology, our funding options are extremely limited. The accepted pathways to sustainability have been institutional support (the academy) or starting a nonprofit. In both cases we all must battle over an ever shrinking grant and philanthropic pool. The alternative is to go for-profit, which has historically meant to become a CRM firm. In the past few years, Benefit corporations (B Corps) have become an international movement for individuals and...


Beyond Research Design: Digital Resource Management for the Next Generation (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Wallrodt. Denitsa Nenova.

Digital technologies in the field of archaeology have often been promoted as a tool enhancing productivity and efficiency, usually implying that the immediate digital recording of data would allow for the excavation of greater volumes and covering larger areas. Moreover, the strength of Paperless Archaeology comes with the enabling of immediate dissemination of observable data while breaking up the ‘sealed’ relationship between the raw data and the First Interpreter. What remains less...


Beyond Solutionism? Digital Data and Threatened Cultural Heritage (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eric Kansa. Sarah Whitcher Kansa.

In his influential book "To Save Everything, Click Here" (2014), Evgeny Morozov coined the term "solutionism" to describe a utopian vision that innovation in digital technologies can solve complex social problems. Fueled by Silicon Valley wealth, digital technologies have an obvious glamor. The high-profile reconstruction of the Palmyra Arch by the Institute for Digital Archaeology exemplifies how governments, universities, corporate sponsors, and granting foundations use media attention on...


Beyond the Wall: Defensive Arrangements, Conflicts and Coexistence Inside an Andean Oasis during the Late Intermediate Period (1100–1450 AD) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Romuald Housse.

Located on the western foothills of the Andes, in the region of Tacna, the study area seems to have been densely occupied during the Late Intermediate Period (1100–1450 AD) as the recent archaeological research carried out in the area has demonstrated it. The many agricultural terraces and irrigation canals, as well as the numerous residential settlements, some of which are fortified, seem to demonstrate a strong desire for control and management of resources among the different groups occupying...