tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

historical ecology (Other Keyword)

1-25 (911 Records)

3D Geometric Morphometrics Applied in the Identification of Canis spp. specimen from a Historic Site in Western Texas (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Lila Jones. Eileen Johnson.

Whiskey Flats, an archaeological site on the Llano Estacado (western Texas), is dated to the mid-18th century and represents Comanche occupation. Ongoing fieldwork has produced a vertebrate assemblage that includes coyote (Canis latrans) and a larger canid (Canis spp.) of a species that remains undetermined. The species of canids that may have been present at the time of deposition are grey wolf (C. lupus), coyote, domestic dog (C. lupus familiaris), and possibly red wolf (C. rufus). The Canis...


Amazonian Landscapes: the characteristics of anthropic landscapes in the Middle Xingu River (Pará, Brazil) from pre-colonial to Contemporary times (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Eliane Faria.

Based on a historical ecology approach, this work aims to investigate interactions between indigenous societies and the natural environment expressed in landscape changes through the analyses of their long term occupation of the Middle Xingu River. My goal is to show the specificities of the indigenous settlements in the region considering the multiple aspects of this process in the human settlement of Amazonia. Although not producing great changes in the landscape, small groups of...


Ancestral Chickasaw Migration and the Makings of the Anthropocene in Southeastern North America (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Charles Cobb. Brad Lieb. Tony Boudreaux.

We describe recent investigations of Indigenous communities who vacated the Tombigbee drainage of eastern Mississippi in the mid-fifteenth century A.D. These and surrounding groups migrated into nearby uplands known as the Blackland Prairie. Populations continued to move northward within the prairie and coalesced around what is today Tupelo, MS, in the 1600s. The move from a riverine to upland setting involved a dramatic shift in practices of historical ecology. The rich soils and open terrain...


Ancient Clam Gardens and Ecological Enhancement on Northern Quadra Island, BC (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Ginevra Toniello. Dana Lepofsky. Kirsten Rowell.

Clam gardens, anthropogenic rock-walled terraces built at the lowest intertidal, are part of an ancient system of mariculture of the Indigenous people of the Northwest Coast of North America. The construction of clam gardens increased shellfish production by increasing ideal clam habitat and creating substrate preferred for clam growth. On Northern Quadra Island, where there is a dense concentration of clam gardens, we assess bivalve productivity of clam gardens by 1) calculating how much clam...


Ancient Clam Gardens of the Southern Gulf Islands (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Eric McLay.

Clam Gardens of the Southern Gulf Islands and southeastern Vancouver Island, British Columbia This paper describes a comprehensive, five-year archaeological project to identify and document the location of ancient intertidal clam garden features in the Southern Gulf Islands and southeastern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. It is discovered that clam gardens in the Southern Gulf Islands region are extensive, exhibit clear patterning in location and morphology, and demonstrate a monumentality...


Ancient DNA and Historical Ecology: An Innovative Approach to Environmental Conservation (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Antonia Rodrigues. Chelsey Geralda Armstrong.

It is now generally accepted that humans are the primary drivers of environmental change; virtually no ecosystem has escaped our influence. With increasing awareness of the impact of humanity on the biosphere, researchers have begun to focus on understanding, protecting and perpetuating biological diversity at all scales and levels of biological organization. One of the best ways to understand current and future anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity is by studying their effects in the past....


Anthropogenic Fire and the Origins of Agricultural Landscapes during the Neolithic Period (7,700–4,500 cal. BP) in Eastern Spain (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Grant Snitker.

Humans have intentionally set fires for millennia to transform the arrangement and diversity of resources within their landscapes, often altering the relationship between fire and ecosystems at multiple scales. Although scholars regularly identify human-altered fire regimes through paleoecological studies, archaeological research has not yet fully incorporated the spatial, temporal, and cultural dimensions of human-caused fire into discussions of the development of agricultural landscapes. This...


At the Gateway to Vermont: Recent Investigations at the Galick Site, West Haven, VT (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Matthew Moriarty. Ellen Moriarty. Rosy Kirk. Bryant Garrow.

In 2016, the South Champlain Historical Ecology Project (SCHEP) initiated investigations at the Galick Site as part of a regional study focusing on long-term human-environment interaction within the South Lake Champlain area. Situated at the confluence of long-distance trade routes and within an area of remarkable ecological diversity, the Galick Site constitutes a key setting for examining historical ecology at the southern end of Lake Champlain. To date, SCHEP has conducted two field seasons...


At the Intersection of Academia and Activism: Using the Historical Ecology Framework Toward the Conservation and Restoration of Natural and Cultural Heritage (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Erina Perez. Thomas Banghart. Hope Loiselle. Kevin Gibbons.

Historical ecology has become one of the most relevant research paradigms in understanding the long-term relationships between humans and their environments. Its multidisciplinary approach dissolves the boundaries between the social and natural sciences to bring together disciplines such as archaeology, ecology, biology, anthropology, ethnohistory, and geography toward the conservation and restoration of natural and cultural heritage. This paper specifically explores archaeology’s unique...


Avifaunal Remains from the Palmrose Site (35CT47): Establishing Seasonality and Investigating Endangered Species (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Hannah Wellman.

Avifaunal remains have great potential to improve archaeological understanding of the economy and subsistence of peoples who lived in the past, as well as to yield information about local ecology, environmental change, and past bird species distribution. The large assemblage of faunal remains from the three archaeological sites comprising the Seaside Collection from Seaside, OR, contains significant quantities of bird bone. Previous analyses of vertebrate remains (including birds) by Greenspan...


California’s Channel Islands as a Model System for Understanding the Historical Ecology of Islands (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Torben Rick. Todd Braje. Leslie Reeder-Myers. Courtney Hofman. Jon Erlandson.

Islands around the world have served as important model systems for understanding a host of cultural and environmental issues. Here we synthesize our long-term research program on the historical ecology and archaeology of California’s Channel Islands. Drawing on zooarchaeological, paleoethnobotanical, genetic, stable isotope, and other datasets we document a 13,000 year sequence of human environmental interactions from coastal foragers to early historical ranchers and modern conservationists....


Caribbean Landscapes in the Age of the Anthropocene: The First Colonizers (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Peter Siegel. John Jones. Deborah Pearsall. Nicholas Dunning. Pat Farrell.

Identifying first human colonization of new places is challenging, especially when groups were small and material traces of their occupations were ephemeral. Generating reliable reconstructions of human-colonization patterns from intact archaeological sites may be exceedingly difficult given post-depositional taphonomic processes and in cases of island and coastal locations the inundation of landscapes resulting from post-Pleistocene sea-level rise. Paleoenvironmental reconstruction is a better...


Changes in Resource Use during the Mississippian Period on St. Catherines Island, Georgia (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Sarah Bergh.

After more than forty years of zooarchaeological research on prehispanic collections from coastal Georgia, it is clear that people exploited the same suite of estuarine resources from the Late Archaic through the Mississippian periods, despite changing socio-political conditions. However, changes in resource use over time are evident when fine-grained recovery and multiple analytical techniques are applied to vertebrate and invertebrate collections from the Mississippian period on St. Catherines...


Colonization of Paradise: Historical Ecology and Archaeology of El Progreso Plantation, Galápagos (1870–1904) (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Fernando J. Astudillo. Peter W. Stahl. Florencio Delgado. Ross W. Jamieson.

Colonization of the Galápagos Islands started soon after Ecuadorian separation from the Gran Colombia in 1830. During this decade the Islands were legally claimed by the Republic of Ecuador and colonization projects started. Exploiting concessions were approved to national and international companies. One of these concessions was assigned to Ecuadorian businessmen Manuel J. Cobos and José Monroy to create an agricultural colony on San Cristóbal Island; 1000 km west from the Ecuadorian coast in...


Cooperation and Coercion: Geography, Ecology, Climate, and Surplus Production in the Rise of the Calusa Kingdom (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT William Marquardt. Victor Thompson. Karen Walker. Michael Savarese. Lee Newsom.

The Calusa of southwest Florida were the most complex and powerful society in Florida during the sixteenth century AD. They relied for protein not on agriculture, but on aquatic resources harvested from shallow-water estuaries. Our interdisciplinary team is exploring the evidence for surplus production and intensification against a background of environmental challenges and opportunities. We focus on Mound Key and Pineland, the two largest Calusa towns. We think that cooperative heterarchical...


Crumbling Infrastructure: Archaeological Perspectives (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Steve Kosiba.

Recently, the term "infrastructure" has gained a remarkable degree of traction in both academic and political discourses. Politicians, from the left and right, bemoan what they term "crumbling infrastructure," offering fixes by way of material and technological improvements to roads, waterways, cities, and energy grids. Scholars draw on and expand posthumanist theories to analyze and expose how infrastructure does not just passively support social aims, but actively shapes (and subverts) human...


Deciphering Ornamental Landscapes at Monticello (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Beatrix Arendt. John G. Jones. Derek Wheeler. Crystal L. Ptacek. Fraser Neiman.

Pollen data can serve as valuable evidence to advance our understanding of change and spatial variation in the landscape of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello from its initial European settlement in the 18th century to the present. The data presented in this paper draws from a multi-year campaign of stratigraphic sampling conducted in the largely ornamental mountaintop landscape immediately surrounding Jefferson's mansion. Comparing these data to stratigraphic samples collected away from the...


Defining Marginality Under Shifting Baselines: Historical Transformations of California’s Channel Island Ecosystems (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Todd Braje.

Spanish arrival to California’s Channel Islands in AD 1542 marked the beginning of widespread ecological changes for island land and seascapes. Over the next several centuries, the Chumash and Tongva were removed to mainland towns and missions, sea otters were extirpated from local waters, commercial fisheries and ranching operations developed, and a variety of new domesticated plants and animals were introduced. The ecological fallout was both swift and extensive, resulting in new terrestrial...


Defining the Anthropocene on California's Northern Channel Islands (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Jon Erlandson. Todd Braje. Kristina Gill. Torben Rick.

California's Northern Channel Islands provide some of the most detailed and well-preserved records of human occupation of dynamic island landscapes in the world. Here, archaeological and historical ecological research over the past 20 years has produced a variety of data about human eco-dynamics in both terrestrial and marine ecosystems, spanning nearly 13,000 years. We summarize current knowledge of cultural and ecological changes from Paleoindian to historic times, focusing on what...


Dialectic in Historical Ecology (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT William Marquardt.

It has been my privilege to call Carole Crumley a friend for 44 years. Our experiences working together in Burgundy, France in the 1970s and 1980s were formative to my research perspective in historical ecology, a perspective to which Carole herself has been a major contributor. Historical ecology is the multiscalar and multitemporal study of the dynamic relations between people and their environment. But “environment” is more than the sum total of one’s physical surroundings. As perceived by...


Different and complementary landscapes: A case of study in the Flona-Tapajós (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Camila Figueiredo.

The goal of this presentation is to contribute to the ongoing debate in Amazonian studies to which human societies impacted and reshaped the landscapes. Landscapes are the results of a human action and environmental changes over time, providing a fundamental dataset for understanding social practices in a historically particular manner (Ingold 1993). Ultimately, this presentation sheds light on the formation and significance of settlement patterns within sites located in the Flona-Tapajós and...


Domesticated Forests? Interpreting Agroforestry Practices from Diachronic Trends in Firewood Collection at the Classic Maya City of Naachtun (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Lydie Dussol. Louise Purdue. Eva Lemonnier. Dominique Michelet. Philippe Nondédéo.

What can be drawn from anthracological data to infer long-term socio-environmental dynamics among ancient Mayas is a question that has received little attention. At Naachtun (Northern Peten, Guatemala), we studied charcoal remains from archaeological contexts in relation with pedological data to reconstruct forest resources and land management through time. Since the beginning of Naachtun's occupation at the end of the Preclassic period (≈ AD 150), domestic firewood economy seems to have been...


Ecological Baselines, Long-Term Population Histories, and the Zooarchaeological Record (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Kelly Beck.

The potential for zooarchaeological data to inform modern conservation issues is unquestioned by archaeologists; however, with a few notable exceptions, such an approach has been underutilized. Zooarchaeological data are uniquely positioned to provide a long-term view on the population history and variation in foraging ecology of a species. Such information is paramount to conservation efforts for threatened taxa, particularly in addressing what has been called by conservation ecologists the...


Ecological legacies of pre-Columbian raised fields and their implications for agroecosystems today (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Delphine Renard. Anne Zangerle. Doyle McKey.

Some South American lowland environments bear impressive legacies of pre-Columbian agriculture: vestiges of raised fields that have persisted since their abandonment centuries or millennia ago. In an interdisciplinary approach, we aim at understanding how the construction and use of raised fields in the past influence the functioning of these ecosystems today. In a raised-field landscape in a seasonally flooded coastal savanna of French Guiana, we characterized the distribution of soil...


Ecology of Bison in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Kenneth Cannon.

Bringing the geologically historic record to bear on questions of ecosystem evolution is a goal emphasized in recent National Research Council reports. Within this context one species has become significant, the bison of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Recent expansion of the population, and its subsequent migration outside federal lands, has created concern among federal managers, local ranchers, and conservation groups. However, much of what is known about pre-management herds is based...

Next
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America