Spanish (Other Keyword)

1-25 (32 Records)

An Analysis of Barrel Components Excavated from the Emanuel Point II Shipwreck (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John R. Elmore.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Plus Ultra: An examination of current research in Spanish Colonial/Iberian Underwater and Terrestrial Archaeology in the Western Hemisphere." , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Wooden containers have been utilized for storing and shipping various goods for thousands of years. The study of these types of containers and their physical components allows archaeologists to understand various cultural phenomena...


Archaeological Excavations at Hacienda La Esperanza, Manatí, Puerto Rico (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Paul Farnsworth. Nydia I. Pontón.

Hacienda La Esperanza, a sugar plantation on the north coast of Puerto Rico, was established in the 1830’s by Captain Fernando Fernández, a wealthy merchant and slave trader. Hacienda La Esperanza thrived until the abolition of slavery in 1873. At its height, La Esperanza was the most technologically advanced sugar factory in Puerto Rico and one of the most successful plantations at the semi-mechanized level in the Antilles. It also housed one of the largest enslaved populations in Puerto Rico...


Calzones, Medias, And Camisas: Comparison Of The Material Assemblages Of 16th Century Spanish Probate Records To The Artifact Assemblage At The Luna Settlement Site (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Casey E Bleuel.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Plus Ultra: An examination of current research in Spanish Colonial/Iberian Underwater and Terrestrial Archaeology in the Western Hemisphere." , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Probate records, documents including wills and estate inventories and auctions, are excellent tools for historical archaeologists who seek to better understand the material possessions of past peoples. Probate and archaeological data...


Ceramic Spatial Patterning at Paraje San Diego on El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, New Mexico (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shannon Cowell.

For travelers on El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the 1,600 mile trail connecting Mexico City to Santa Fe, the Paraje San Diego (LA 6346) in southern New Mexico is a significant campsite connecting the trail to the Rio Grande before it diverges into the waterless Jornada del Muerto to the north.  Past analysis of ceramics from the site revealed broad patterns in directional trade and chronology of the Camino Real; recent field data, including point-plotted ceramics recovered from the site,...


The Coins of Fort Atkinson: a study in numismatic archaeology. (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lawrence Lee.

Unlike much of the rest of the world, numismatics as practiced in America has little recognized scholastic standing. The lack of perceived value for numismatics is readily apparent in the archeology of the Great Plains, where the indigenous economy was not based on bullion value, where coin hoards like those found on the eastern seaboard are basically non-existent and numismatic objects are considered to ‘historic’ and thus intrusive to the prehistory of the region. In such a setting, numismatic...


Commodity Culture: the formation, exchange, and negotiation of Early Republican Period identity on a periphery of the Spanish Empire in Western El Salvador (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren Alston Bridges.

During the Early Republican Period, the sugar industry increasingly connected a fledgling Salvadoran country to a global market. A creolized labor force produced sugar on large estates known as haciendas. The hacienda was a crossroads of indigenous, African, and European interests as evidenced in the ceramic landscapes of the Río Ceniza Valley. The extensive organization of labor, on a periphery of the Spanish Empire, was underscored by a complex set of power relations. This research focuses on...


Consequences of Warfare, Reforms, and Capitalism in Late Colonial Port of Veracruz, Mexico (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Krista Eschbach.

At the beginning of the 18th century, Spain and its American colonies were still steeped in mercantilism with the Spanish Crown and elite merchants struggling to maintain a monopoly over trans-Atlantic trade. Over the next hundred years, this economic system was transformed as a result of political and economic events in Europe and the Spanish colonies. By the end of the 18th century, the Port of Veracruz, once one of the few legal ports in Spain's American colonies, was now one of many ports...


Conservation of a Spanish Breastplate from the 1559 Luna Colony (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James A. Gazaway.

This is a poster submission presented at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. This poster recounts the 2017-2018 conservation process of a Spanish breastplate recovered after being submerged for over 400 years from the wreck site of the Emanuel Point I . The Emmanuel Point I is the name given to the first Spanish ship from the Luna Colony of 1559-1561, found by divers from the State of Florida and the students/staff of Archaeology Department of the University of...


Copper On The Borderlands Of New Spain...It's Complicated (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Russell K Skowronek. Richard E Johnson. James R. Hinthorne.

This is an abstract from the "Meaning in Material Culture" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Copper vessels are an understudied artifact category for students of the Spanish colonial experience.  At the 2018, SHA New Orleans meeting the promise and problems associated with the analysis of copper vessels was discussed.  This included forms, uses, nomenclature, and fabrication. In that presentation, copper vessels from the Southeast U.S. and Texas...


Copper-The Overlooked Artifact Of The Borderlands Of New Spain (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Russell K Skowronek.

From the littoral of Florida to coastal California vessels made of copper have been regularly found on archaeological sites associated with the borderlands of New Spain.  While described in in the associated archaeological literature they, unlike the ubiquitous copper artifacts associated with sites in New France, have not received systematic analysis.  This presentation, based on nearly two decades of archaeological and documentary research, brings the folk taxonomy found in documents into...


The Dish Ran Away with the Spoon: Revisiting Unprovenienced Food Ways Artifacts from the Spanish Fleet Wrecks of Eighteenth Century Florida (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Olivia L. Thomas.

The Spanish empire was the first European power to establish permanent settlements on several Caribbean islands and coasts of North America, that flourished as New World colonies and facilitated prosperous trade between the New and Old Worlds. The distance between Spain and the colonies led to differences in the lifestyles and customs of these frontier spaces. Archaeological investigations both on land and underwater have yielded numerous pieces of material culture, reflecting Spanish life and...


European Influences in Ancient Hawaii (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Richard W. Rogers.

Pacific Cartography establishes three discoveries of the Hawaiian Archipelago during the 16th century. Spanish records note Manila Galleons missing with no trace in the late 16th century and again around 1700. Dutchmen suffered desertion of crewmembers, at islands in the central Pacific at 16 degrees north, in the year 1600 AD. Hawaiian tradition specifically mentions two shipwrecks, with female survivors, and is rife with stories of visitors, many of whom became prominent citizens in an...


Exploring the Social and Physical Landscapes of Colonial New Mexico (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather Trigg. Kyle W. Edwards.

Reshaping the settlement landscape is a significant aspect of the colonial encounter in that it provided the ecological context for social interactions. In the American Southwest, the Spaniards’ introduction of Eurasian plants and animals as well as new land use practices had a profound effect on the physical and cultural environment. We use palynological data from a 500-year period that illustrates both the impact of indigenous Pueblo peoples’ engagement with the pre-colonial landscape as well...


Finding The 1526 Flagship Of Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles D Bendig.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Plus Ultra: An examination of current research in Spanish Colonial/Iberian Underwater and Terrestrial Archaeology in the Western Hemisphere." , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. On a stormy night in 1526, the flagship from the Lucas Vázquez de Ayllón expedition hit a sandbar and sank at the entrance to the Jordan river. Slavers from Hispaniola had visited this new landmass five years earlier and reported on a...


Finding The Indigenous – A Study Of Locally Made Earthenware In Early Spanish Manila, The Philippines (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ellen Hsieh.

The Spanish colonists created the first urban landscape in the Manila area during the late 16th century and certainly changed the lives of the Tagalog people. Although the ethnic-based residential policy makes it possible to compare lives of different groups in the colonial society, there are no archaeological sites representing indigenous settlements in the early colonial period to date. This paper shows that locally made earthenware found in non-indigenous settlements sheds light on the...


The First Emanuel Point Ship: Archaeological Investigation of a 16th-Century Spanish Colonization Vessel (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John R. Bratten.

The first Emanuel Point Ship (EPI) was discovered in 1992 and firmly associated with the 1559 colonization fleet of Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano in 1998.  This followed the initial discovery, preliminary investigation, and multi-year excavation accomplished by the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, the Historic Pensacola Preservation Board and the University of West Florida. Since that time, laboratory conservation, additional historical research, the production of numerous student...


From Excavation to the Laboratory: A Multi-faceted Analysis of the Emanuel Point Shipwrecks (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Bratten.

The first Emanuel Point Shipwreck was discovered in 1992 and the second, Emanuel Point 2, was discovered in 2006. Both of these vessels have been firmly associated with a 1559 colonization attempt of what we know today as Pensacola, Florida. In addition to the archaeological excavation and historical research given to both vessels, many specialized types of analyses have been undertaken to paint a more complete image of this 16th-century Spanish endeavor to gain a foothold in La Florida. These...


Laboring along the Rio Grande: Contextualizing Labor of the Spanish Early Colonial Period of New Mexico. (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Adam C Brinkman.

Labor was a core component of the early period (1598-1680) of Spanish colonization of New Mexico. After failing to uncover mineral wealth in their new colony, the Spaniards kept their colony afloat by focusing on another exploitable resource: Indigenous labor. Historical archaeologists (e.g Silliman 2001, 2004; Voss 2008) have recently been reconsidering colonialism from a framework grounded in labor relationships. We know that Pueblo Indians and enslaved Plains people were forced to work on...


The Luna Expedition: An Overview from the Documents (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Worth.

The 1559-1561 expedition of Tristán de Luna was the largest and most well-financed Spanish attempt to colonize southeastern North America up to that time. Had it succeeded, New Spain would have expanded to include a settled terrestrial route from the northern Gulf of Mexico to the lower Atlantic coast.  While a hurricane left most of the fleet and the colony’s food stores on the bottom of Pensacola Bay just five weeks after arrival, the colonists nonetheless struggled to survive over the next...


Mapping Spanish Settlement at Santa Elena (1566-1587): An Integrated Archaeogeophysical Approach (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jake Lulewicz. Victor Thompson. Chester B. DePratter.

This is an abstract from the "Technology in Terrestrial and Underwater Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Santa Elena, located on Parris Island along the South Carolina coast, was occupied between AD 1566 and 1587. During this time, it served as the location for five Spanish forts, a colonial town of over 200 settlers, and as the first capital of Spanish La Florida. We combine 30+ years of archaeological investigations with a new...


The Measure of Meaning: Identity and Change among Two Contact-Period Cherokee Site Bead Assemblages (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melissa Frederick.

Archaeologists have studied bone, shell, and glass beads for several decades, in search of their meaning among Native American cultures. The significance of these small artifacts among the Cherokee is evident in their mythology, personal adornment, and rituals. Thus, they represent an integral part of Cherokee cultural identity. Previous archaeological research at 40GN9, linked to the sixteenth-century Cherokee town of Canasoga located in Tennessee, demonstrated the predominantly shell beads...


Metal Detecting on the Baja California Galleon Wreck (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Peter Von der Porten.

This paper discusses the use of metal detectors in the investigation of a late sixteenth-century Manila galleon shipwreck in Baja California, Mexico. The use of metal detectors has successfully identified artifacts and structural remains from the ship, and has aided in the delineation of the boundaries of the terrestrial portion of the wreck site. This paper discusses the types of metal targets expected on the wreck, metal detecting methodologies developed over many field seasons, examples of...


More than a Supply Stop: The Maima Village Before and After Columbus (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shea Henry.

In the winter of 1503-04, Christopher Columbus was marooned and provisioned by the Taino village of Maima located on the north central coast of Jamaica.  What we know about the Taino of this village remains what was written in the accounts of those marooned Spanish explorers.  After the year spent in this village the Spanish returned to the area and founded the settlement of Sevilla la Nueva, resulting in the people of Maima becoming victims of forced labor, conversion and disease.  What is...


New Developments on the Emanuel Point II Shipwreck Project: Ongoing Investigations of a Vessel from Luna’s 1559 Fleet (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gregory Cook.

Investigations on the second shipwreck identified as a vessel from Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano’s 1559 fleet have intensified during the past year due to successful funding efforts.  The site, known as "Emanuel Point II", is a well-preserved example of ship architecture related to early Spanish colonization efforts. Archaeologists and students from the University of West Florida have focused recent excavations on the vessel’s stern and midships area, and have uncovered new artifacts and...


"…nothing else of great artifactual value" or "…found nothing on the site at all": What remains of an eighteenth century colonial shipwreck in Biscayne National Park? (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melissa Price. Jennifer F McKinnon. Charles Lawson.

The title of this paper illuminates the short sided approach held by those in search of "treasure" in the 1960s and 1970s in south Florida. It also provides a window into the past and present about how the Pillar Dollar Wreck in Biscayne National Park has been, and continues to be, impacted by adventure seekers, treasure salvors and looters. This paper outlines recent archaeological excavations of the Pillar Dollar Wreck and reveals there is still much to be found and studied in the shifting...