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Accessing and Assessing Coastal Shell Middens on Private Property in the Pacific Northwest (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephanie Jolivette. Amanda Taylor. Sarah Van Galder.

The majority of coastal property in the Pacific Northwest is in private hands. Although laws in Washington State protect archaeological sites on private property, such sites are traditionally only assessed on a case by case basis when the landowner seeks a permit. Landscape scale assessments of coastal resources in the Puget Sound region are rare. Here we compare the results of two such projects along Puget Sound; an academic project in the San Juan Islands conducted by researchers at the...


Admiring the Hush Arbor: Confronting Slavery in the American South (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael B Thomin. Tristan J Harrenstein.

This is an abstract from the "The Public and Our Communities: How to Present Engaging Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In March 2017, the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) North Central regional office created a new public program called "Admiring the Hush Arbor." A hush arbor was a meeting place, usually secret, that took place outdoors where enslaved African-Americans practiced religious traditions and served as a framework...


Archaeologists In Parks (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John P McCarthy.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Community Archaeology in 2020: Conventional or Revolutionary?" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. State and local natural resources and parks agencies have added archaeologists to their staffs in the decades since the passing of the National Historic Preservation Act. Archaeological professionals, like the author, were hired to help ensure compliance with Section 106 of NHPA and related provisions of the...


Archaeology and Public Memory at the Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Site (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew R. Laird.

The discovery and excavation of the Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Site (44HE1053) in Richmond, Virginia, between 2006 and 2009 garnered more media and public attention than any other archaeological project in the city’s history.   Spearheaded by the Richmond City Council’s Slave Trail Commission, the investigations revealed the remarkably well-preserved remains of the slave-trading complex operated by Robert Lumpkin from the 1840s through the fall of Richmond in 1865, and which later served as the site...


Archaeology Education for Children: Measuring Success and Avoiding Pitfalls (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeanne Moe.

In the past 30 years, archaeologists have taught children and youth about the processes of archaeological inquiry and the results of archaeological research. Hundreds, if not thousands of education programs have sprouted over the last 30 years; some have endured while others have faded away. Some efforts and programs are aimed at formal learning in school classrooms while many others are based in informal settings such as museums, outdoor learning centers, after-school programs, and many others....


Archaeology Story Time: Using Tilden’s 6th Principle to Educate K-2 Children in Public Archaeology (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael B Thomin. Laura Clark Hunt. Tristan J Harrenstein.

This is a paper/report submission presented at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In 2018 Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) Coordinating Center staff in Pensacola, Florida implemented a pilot program called “Archaeology Story Time.” This public program was designed specifically for an age group that is routinely overlooked in public archaeology education and outreach: young children in grades K-2. Based on assessments of caregivers’ perspectives of the...


#Archeology: Loose Lips Save Slave Ships? (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only boyd sipe.

The discovery of the hulk of an 18th-century sailing ship during archeological excavations at the Hotel Indigo site in the City of Alexandria, Virginia attracted the attention of local, national and international corporate media and trended on social media sites. Reflecting on this project’s 15 minutes of fame and media attention associated with other recent high-profile archeological projects in the Washington D.C. metro area, various issues including unequal access to media, knowledge, and...


"Can We Work Together?": Archaeology And Community Tensions At Camp Security (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicholas Zeitlin. John T. Crawmer.

This is a paper/report submission presented at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Camp Security is a prisoner-of-war camp established during the Revolutionary War and the only such camp to survive modern development. From July 1781 and May 1783, the camp housed 1600-1800 British POWs captured at the Battles of Saratoga and Yorktown. Efforts to locate residential areas in the complex have been ongoing sporadically since the 1970s, but the exact location of the...


Castle House Coop: Unmasking an Artist's Space (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary Petrich-Guy. Renae J. Campbell.

Self-taught artist, James Castle, lived his entire life in Idaho (1899-1977). From a young age, he created his works from everyday materials, such as mail, matchboxes, pages of siblings’ homework, and found objects. Castle moved to Boise with his family in the 1930s and while at this farm, he used a converted chicken coop/shed as a private workspace and abode. In October 2016, archaeologists from the University of Idaho (UI) collaborated with the James Castle House, Boise City Department of Arts...


Changing Attitudes and Perspectives on Public Participation in Archaeology: The Case of the Southwest Archaeology Team (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jerry Howard.

In the early 1980s the Southwest Archaeology Team was formed under what is now the Arizona Museum of Natural History. Reacting to a need for an emergency response team to preserve information from archaeological sites, not protected by state or federal regulations, but being destroyed by development. While initially considered as outsiders and non-professionals, the acceptance of the public working on archaeological excavations quickly changed. This paper focuses on the changing attitudes and...


Community Archaeology at a Neighborhood Scale in Boston's Chinatown (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph M. Bagley. Jocelyn S Lee.

This is a poster submission presented at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. A significant Chinese immigrant wave began in Boston during the 1870’s. Throughout the next decade, a centralized Chinese community began to form downtown on Harrison, Essex, and Beach Avenues. This neighborhood allowed residents to converge on Sundays, meet with friends, buy food and supplies, and seek solace through gambling and opium. Recently, Boston’s Chinatown residents requested an...


Community Involvement in the Management of Submerged Cultural Resources on Lake Champlain (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Sabick.

This is an abstract from the "Shipwrecks and the Public: Getting People Engaged with their Maritime History" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. During the summer of 2018 the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum (LCMM) began an initiative to involve the local avocational dive community in the management of the cultural resources of Lake Champlain.  Through the support of a National Maritime Heritage Grant, LCMM archaeologists began the process of training...


CRM and Public Engagement in the Northwest United States (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary C Petrich-Guy. Jeff Marks.

Cultural Resource Management, or CRM, accounts for most of the archaeology conducted in the United States but due to a number of varying factors such as budget, time, location, and legal constraints, public engagement initiated by private archaeological firms remains the exception and not the norm. The scope of work is often limited to adhering to the legal mandates prescribed to firms by federal and state governing bodies. CRM companies can take approaches to ensure that the public is informed...


Cuban Heritage Understanding through Guided Surveys (CHUGS): Establishing a public workshop and database (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Nohe.

Washed up on the Florida shore, the boats that survive the voyage from Cuba are more than a means of transportation; they represent the refugee’s stories of ingenuity and courage. Known as "chugs" due to the sound they make, these boats can be anything from fishing yachts or skiffs, to vernacular vessels that almost defy categorization. These chugs are the physical artifacts of the struggle for political and economic freedom that has propelled thousands to make the dangerous journey over more...


De-Centering Expertise in Public Archaeology: Promises and Perils from the Great Bay Archaeological Survey (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Meghan C.L. Howey.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Public Archaeology in New Hampshire: Museum and University Research" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The Great Bay Archaeological Survey (GBAS) explores early colonial settlements in the Great Bay Estuary (1620-1750 AD). Public and community are buzzwords in conversations around the future of archaeology because there is a sense we must have real buy-in from the broader public to remain relevant. However,...


Dialogues on the Experience of War: Difficult Heritage (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer F McKinnon. Anne Ticknor. Anna Froula.

War in the Pacific: Difficult Heritage recently engaged veterans, veteran families, and WWII survivors on the Pacific island of Saipan in considering how conflict heritage can be seen as universal to humanity and how it can be used to examine the veteran’s experience. The starting point for this consideration was to focus on the historical and contemporary warrior/veteran’s experiences as it relates to collective human experience of war and how we might come to understand and interpret the...


Digging Beantown: Uncovering Community Identity Through Public Archaeology in Boston (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph M. Bagley.

This is an abstract from the "Technology and Public Outreach" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Founded in 1983, Boston's City Archaeology Program has undergone an evolution of function and accessibility.  Since 2011, the Program has opened access to Boston's archaeological heritage through social media, community archaeology, public education, and artifact digitization. This paper reviews the evolution of the Program, discusses successes and...


The Digital Crunch of COVID-19: The Results of a Small Museum Producing Digital Content for a Potential New Digital Audience (2021)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alice W Merkel.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Remote Archaeology: Taking Archaeology Online in the Wake of COVID-19" , at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In response to the 2020 COVID-19 global pandemic, Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in Southern Maryland saw a dramatic shift towards digital content creation as a method of engaging the public. This shift was a dramatic one for small museums like ours- that hold educational programs, in-person tours and...


Don’t Hold Your Breath – Initiating Community Projects and Public Engagement through an Invested Collaboration in Maritime Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel B. Rees. Chanelle Zaphiropoulos.

This poster presents perspectives on community engagement and investment in maritime heritage. Focusing on public programs in archaeology, this research speaks to the importance of immersive and interactive learning towards public education on the relevance of maritime history, including the processes and issues associated with excavation, identification, and conservation. The content of this review comes in reflection of Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) courses and surveys completed on the...


Don’t Hold Your Breath – Initiating Community Projects and Public Engagement through an Invested Collaboration in Maritime Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel B. Rees.

This project presents perspectives on community engagement and investment in maritime heritage. Focusing on public programs in archaeology, this research speaks to the importance of immersive and interactive learning towards public education on the relevance of maritime history, including the processes and issues associated with excavation, identification, and conservation. The content of this review comes in reflection of Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) courses and surveys completed on the...


Educating The Public About Archeological Excavations (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Suzanne Spencer-Wood.

This is an abstract from the "The Public and Our Communities: How to Present Engaging Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Public education is important to promote understanding of archaeology. Excavations I have directed since 1972 have both educated students and welcomed visits and participation of local adults and children who became interested in the hands-on experiential learning involved in excavations. Media publications, including...


Engaging and Entertaining the Public in South Florida (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara Ayers-Rigsby. Mallory Fenn. Rachael Kangas.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Recent Development of Maritime and Historical Archaeology Programs in South Florida" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The Florida Public Archaeology Network's south region has conducted a number of public engagement programs in south Florida to reach over twenty thousand people in the past two years. FPAN's programming focuses on both terrestrial and submerged sites. This dual focus is critical in engaging...


The Estonian open-air museum as a caterer to the needs of the society (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elo Lutsepp.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the EXARC Bibliography, originally compiled by Roeland Paardekooper, and updated. Most of these records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us using the...


Finding Nouvelle Acadie: Lost Colonies, Collective Memory, and Public Archaeology as an Expedition of Discovery (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark A Rees.

In 1765 more than 200 Acadian émigrés from Nova Scotia arrived in south Louisiana and established the colony of Nouvelle Acadie along the natural levees of the Bayou Teche.  Joined by fellow exiles and extended family, two centuries later their numerous descendants experienced a cultural revitalization as Cajuns living in a colonized homeland called Acadiana. During the past three years the New Acadia Project has surveyed portions of the Teche Ridge in search of the original home sites and...


From Fife to the Chesapeake: Scottish Immigrants and the Development of Public Landscapes in Early Eighteenth Century Maryland. (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only michael lucas.

Ninian Beall was captured at the Battle of Dunbar in 1650 along with many of his countrymen and sent to Maryland as an indentured servant.  Beall’s arrival marks an important milestone in the settlement of the Chesapeake region.  Beall sponsored the transport of many Scottish immigrants who settled along the banks of the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers.  Some of these individuals became powerful local politicians, slave owners, and active participants in trade with Native Americans living in the...