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Accessing and Assessing Coastal Shell Middens on Private Property in the Pacific Northwest (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Stephanie Jolivette. Amanda Taylor. Sarah Van Galder.

The majority of coastal property in the Pacific Northwest is in private hands. Although laws in Washington State protect archaeological sites on private property, such sites are traditionally only assessed on a case by case basis when the landowner seeks a permit. Landscape scale assessments of coastal resources in the Puget Sound region are rare. Here we compare the results of two such projects along Puget Sound; an academic project in the San Juan Islands conducted by researchers at the...


Archaeology and Public Memory at the Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Site (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Matthew R. Laird.

The discovery and excavation of the Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Site (44HE1053) in Richmond, Virginia, between 2006 and 2009 garnered more media and public attention than any other archaeological project in the city’s history.   Spearheaded by the Richmond City Council’s Slave Trail Commission, the investigations revealed the remarkably well-preserved remains of the slave-trading complex operated by Robert Lumpkin from the 1840s through the fall of Richmond in 1865, and which later served as the site...


Archaeology Education for Children: Measuring Success and Avoiding Pitfalls (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Jeanne Moe.

In the past 30 years, archaeologists have taught children and youth about the processes of archaeological inquiry and the results of archaeological research. Hundreds, if not thousands of education programs have sprouted over the last 30 years; some have endured while others have faded away. Some efforts and programs are aimed at formal learning in school classrooms while many others are based in informal settings such as museums, outdoor learning centers, after-school programs, and many others....


#Archeology: Loose Lips Save Slave Ships? (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT boyd sipe.

The discovery of the hulk of an 18th-century sailing ship during archeological excavations at the Hotel Indigo site in the City of Alexandria, Virginia attracted the attention of local, national and international corporate media and trended on social media sites. Reflecting on this project’s 15 minutes of fame and media attention associated with other recent high-profile archeological projects in the Washington D.C. metro area, various issues including unequal access to media, knowledge, and...


Castle House Coop: Unmasking an Artist's Space (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Mary Petrich-Guy. Renae J. Campbell.

Self-taught artist, James Castle, lived his entire life in Idaho (1899-1977). From a young age, he created his works from everyday materials, such as mail, matchboxes, pages of siblings’ homework, and found objects. Castle moved to Boise with his family in the 1930s and while at this farm, he used a converted chicken coop/shed as a private workspace and abode. In October 2016, archaeologists from the University of Idaho (UI) collaborated with the James Castle House, Boise City Department of Arts...


Changing Attitudes and Perspectives on Public Participation in Archaeology: The Case of the Southwest Archaeology Team (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Jerry Howard.

In the early 1980s the Southwest Archaeology Team was formed under what is now the Arizona Museum of Natural History. Reacting to a need for an emergency response team to preserve information from archaeological sites, not protected by state or federal regulations, but being destroyed by development. While initially considered as outsiders and non-professionals, the acceptance of the public working on archaeological excavations quickly changed. This paper focuses on the changing attitudes and...


CRM and Public Engagement in the Northwest United States (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Mary C Petrich-Guy. Jeff Marks.

Cultural Resource Management, or CRM, accounts for most of the archaeology conducted in the United States but due to a number of varying factors such as budget, time, location, and legal constraints, public engagement initiated by private archaeological firms remains the exception and not the norm. The scope of work is often limited to adhering to the legal mandates prescribed to firms by federal and state governing bodies. CRM companies can take approaches to ensure that the public is informed...


Cuban Heritage Understanding through Guided Surveys (CHUGS): Establishing a public workshop and database (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Sarah Nohe.

Washed up on the Florida shore, the boats that survive the voyage from Cuba are more than a means of transportation; they represent the refugee’s stories of ingenuity and courage. Known as "chugs" due to the sound they make, these boats can be anything from fishing yachts or skiffs, to vernacular vessels that almost defy categorization. These chugs are the physical artifacts of the struggle for political and economic freedom that has propelled thousands to make the dangerous journey over more...


Dialogues on the Experience of War: Difficult Heritage (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Jennifer F McKinnon. Anne Ticknor. Anna Froula.

War in the Pacific: Difficult Heritage recently engaged veterans, veteran families, and WWII survivors on the Pacific island of Saipan in considering how conflict heritage can be seen as universal to humanity and how it can be used to examine the veteran’s experience. The starting point for this consideration was to focus on the historical and contemporary warrior/veteran’s experiences as it relates to collective human experience of war and how we might come to understand and interpret the...


Don’t Hold Your Breath – Initiating Community Projects and Public Engagement through an Invested Collaboration in Maritime Archaeology (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Daniel B. Rees.

This project presents perspectives on community engagement and investment in maritime heritage. Focusing on public programs in archaeology, this research speaks to the importance of immersive and interactive learning towards public education on the relevance of maritime history, including the processes and issues associated with excavation, identification, and conservation. The content of this review comes in reflection of Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) courses and surveys completed on the...


Don’t Hold Your Breath – Initiating Community Projects and Public Engagement through an Invested Collaboration in Maritime Archaeology (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Daniel B. Rees. Chanelle Zaphiropoulos.

This poster presents perspectives on community engagement and investment in maritime heritage. Focusing on public programs in archaeology, this research speaks to the importance of immersive and interactive learning towards public education on the relevance of maritime history, including the processes and issues associated with excavation, identification, and conservation. The content of this review comes in reflection of Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) courses and surveys completed on the...


The Estonian open-air museum as a caterer to the needs of the society (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Elo Lutsepp.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the EXARC Bibliography, originally compiled by Roeland Paardekooper, and updated. Most of these records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us using the...


Finding Nouvelle Acadie: Lost Colonies, Collective Memory, and Public Archaeology as an Expedition of Discovery (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Mark A Rees.

In 1765 more than 200 Acadian émigrés from Nova Scotia arrived in south Louisiana and established the colony of Nouvelle Acadie along the natural levees of the Bayou Teche.  Joined by fellow exiles and extended family, two centuries later their numerous descendants experienced a cultural revitalization as Cajuns living in a colonized homeland called Acadiana. During the past three years the New Acadia Project has surveyed portions of the Teche Ridge in search of the original home sites and...


From Fife to the Chesapeake: Scottish Immigrants and the Development of Public Landscapes in Early Eighteenth Century Maryland. (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT michael lucas.

Ninian Beall was captured at the Battle of Dunbar in 1650 along with many of his countrymen and sent to Maryland as an indentured servant.  Beall’s arrival marks an important milestone in the settlement of the Chesapeake region.  Beall sponsored the transport of many Scottish immigrants who settled along the banks of the Potomac and Patuxent Rivers.  Some of these individuals became powerful local politicians, slave owners, and active participants in trade with Native Americans living in the...


Global Perspectives on British Archaeology: ‘engaging with East Anglian archaeology through a Japanese lens’ (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Sam Nixon. Simon Kaner.

This presentation introduces a project providing a new examination of the relationships between local, national and global archaeologies, Global Perspectives on British Archaeology. World Archaeology is a hugely active field of research for British archaeological institutions, with sustained field programs worldwide. In contrast, research on British archaeology sees little involvement of non-British research institutions. Within an increasingly globalised world of education and research, there...


Hardly "Junk" in the Trunk: Exploring Participant Feedback from Archaeology Education Tool Testing (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Mary C Petrich-Guy.

Though preservation and cultural resource management laws were written with the public in mind, effectively engaging the public is a constant challenge. In the face of demands for measurable results in education programs and the classroom, both archaeologists and educators are turning focus towards assessment. Archaeology teaching kits for elementary classrooms can be useful tools, facilitating an integration of archaeological material into schools. Deaccessioned archaeological materials from...


The Heritage Education Network: From Individual Efforts to Professional Action (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Carol Ellick.

The force behind public outreach and archaeological education has been individuals within agencies, those who’ve formed committees, and those who have dedicated their professional careers ensuring that we communicate beyond ourselves. However, after 30 years, this "profession" still basically exists at the whim of professional organizations and volunteer committees, and through dedicated individuals. In 2015, at the Archaeological Institute of America sponsored Educators’ Conference in New...


In the Shadow of the Capitol – Stateless and Compliant: 50 Years of the NHPA in Washington, D.C. (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Ruth Trocolli.

Despite the District of Columbia’s small size (69 sq. miles), the proportion of property in federal ownership, about 25%, results in a large number of projects annually subject to Section 106 review. Every federal agency, quasi-federal agency, and non-federal entity using federal funds enters 106 consultation, even those without in-house preservation professionals to guide them. Agencies without archaeologists rely on the District’s archaeologist for expertise and guidance. Mitigation has...


Itinerary of an apprenticeship and the development of public event archaeological presentations (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Pierre-Alain Capt.

Perfecting a public event presentation in the domain of history and archaeology is a long and complex process. It requires mastering three vastly different professions, each with specific competences, and melding them into one coherent presentation. It is a long path from independent archaeological researcher to a craftsman working in the seclusion of a studio, to the role of public presenter, demonstrating both the craft and inspiring an interest for history, while valorising and promoting the...


Landscape, Public Archaeology, and Memory (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Linda M. Ziegenbein.

     People engage with place and space in profound and commonplace ways, deriving and creating meaning from the environment around them.  People and spaces are co-created: while people imbue the landscape with meaning, those same meanings come to shape the people themselves.  Basso (1996) refers this process as a sensing of place.         Archaeologists and other anthropologists have long recognized the central role the landscape plays in the processes of memory creation and retention as well...


Lengthier Studies, Fewer Explosions: How Mass Effect Showcases the Future of Archaeology Through Liara T'Son (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Diana L Johnson. Katherine D. Thomas.

As we celebrate 50 years of the Society for Historical Archaeology, we must decide what our future will look like. In Bioware’s Mass Effect series, we can see what an archaeologist will look like in the future. Liara T’soni is a xenoarchaeologist, alien, and one of the main characters of the series. Throughout her journey, your hero helps her with her professional goals, and her profession helps you accomplish the task of helping the universe. This paper will explore her professional life in the...


Living on the Edge: The German Ridge Heritage Project in Hoosier National Forest  (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Timothy Baumann. Sara Clark. Angie Krieger. G. William Monaghan. Nathan Johnson. Matthew Pike.

This presentation will highlight the preliminary findings of the 2012 archaeological excavations conducted as part of the German Ridge Heritage Project, a joint venture between Hoosier National Forest and Indiana University to document the lives and culture of early settlers in the German Ridge community of Perry County, Indiana.   German Ridge was first occupied by American settlers in the 1830s and then by German immigrants in the 1850s.  These people lived on the edge as they attempted to...


Making Historical Archaeology Visible: Experiences in Digital (and Analog) Community Outreach in Arkansas (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Jamie Brandon.

The Arkansas Archeological Survey’s mission is to conserve and research the state's heritage and communicate this information to the public. The AAS has always been known for its outreach and education efforts, but it has been slow to turn to digital engagement.  This paper will talk about the author’s experience in doing digital (and analog) archaeological outreach and education in the predominately rural state of Arkansas for the past decade.  It will examine how digital outreach has changed...


More Than a Pair of Hands: the Education and Rights of Local Field-Workers (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Matthew Litteral.

The archaeologist abroad must be held responsible for the fair treatment of his/her locally sourced workers. Fair treatment should go beyond providing a pay check comparable to standards in the United States. Archaeologists should feel ethically obligated to provide a wealth of knowledge to local field-workers. There remains much inconsistency in adherence to SAA principles of ethics. Particularly principles 2 and 4, as they relate to the accountability to local peoples and comment to public...


Museums and Archaeology: Creating Partnerships to Engage Families and Children (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Christina M O'Grady.

The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis created the "Treasures of the Earth" exhibit to engage children and families in the world of archaeology.  Museum staff worked closely with archaeologist advisors to produce recreations  of three distinct archaeological "sites", the tomb of Seti I in Egypt, the terra cotta warriors of China, and the underwater remains of an 18th century Caribbean shipwreck.  Artifacts and activities in each area convey the sense of discovery that drives archaeology while...

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America