collaborative archaeology (Other Keyword)

1-10 (10 Records)

Archaeology is Appealing: Collaborative Approaches to Foster Public Engagement with the Past (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kari L Lentz. Kate O'Donnell. Stephanie Stewart-Bailey.

The technology industry is rapidly transforming the social and physical landscape of San Francisco. While the city’s zeitgeist is orientated toward the future, archaeologists labor to recover and record its vanishing history. The enormous scale of construction has resulted in an unprecedented volume of artifacts and data that all too often languish on shelves and in gray literature. Budget crunches and curation crises have led to cooperation with institutions at the forefront of public...


Collaboration, collaborators, and conflict: ethics, engagement, and archaeological practice (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Audrey Horning.

Collaboration in contemporary archaeological parlance principally refers to active engagement with one or more selected groups of stakeholders and co-producers of knowledge. But knowledge is always produced for a purpose, and collaboration, or to be a ‘collaborator’ in conflict settings implies an allegiance, often deceitful, to one cause or another. When embedding archaeology in conflict transformation activities, being seen as a ‘collaborator’, or partisan, can actively work against the aims...


"Collaborative" Archaeology: A proposed rubric-based assessment of archaeological projects with American Indian communities (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Eklund. Lisa Palacios.

In Transforming Archaeology, Atalay et al. (2013) have identified benefits of collaborative projects for both the discipline and participating communities. A well-designed collaborative project has the potential to both foster the application of standard archaeological research methods to questions of interest to various tribes and apply Indigenous research methods to standard archaeology inquires. We propose a standardized evaluation scorecard (rubric), to examine outcomes to American Indian...


Conflict Landscapes: Mitigating Inter-generational Trauma through Collaborative Archaeology (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Diane L. Teeman. Sarah E. Cowie.

Traditional Indigenous landscapes are imbued with cultural meaning and value. After contact, Indigenous trails often gained uses for military conflict, immigrant travel, and removal of Indigenous people from their homelands, adding additional meaning to the landscape. Nevada’s historic Stewart Indian School is another Indigenous landscape later used in the federal effort to assimilate Native children. Both case studies demonstrate that processes of governmentality, disciplinary power, and...


Deep Impacts of Mohegan Archaeology: Indigenous Knowledge and its Influence on the Past (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Craig Cipolla. James Quinn. Jay Levy.

There is no doubt that indigenous, collaborative, and community-based projects have made great strides in reshaping the ways in which archaeological research is conducted and carried out in North America. Comparatively speaking, however, reporting on collaborative projects often place less emphasis on the ways in which indigenous and hybridized versions of archaeology influence our interpretations of the past and penetrate archaeology at the level of theory. In this paper we attempt to fill this...


Empowering Tribal Youth in Cultural Heritage Management (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Guilfoyle. Genevieve Carey. Raven Willoya-Williams. Michael Bernard. Sherry Kime.

We examine a multi-year cultural heritage training program developed by Elders, youth and archaeologists in the Kenai Peninsula of Alaska. The program aims to embed cultural protocols and knowledge into methods of cultural heritage management (CHM). The program demonstrates the benefits of collaborative approaches that provide the foundation for more effective CHM, while at the same time providing direct social outcomes. We examine how this was established via a case study of one of the...


The Future of the Past at Fort St. Joseph, Niles, Michigan (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Nassaney.

The Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project was initiated in 1998 as a collaborative partnership between Western Michigan University, the City of Niles, and various community groups. After 10 seasons of site investigations, scholarly publications, and public archaeology at this eighteenth-century French fur trading post, the Fort St. Joseph Archaeology Advisory Committee invited historic preservation professionals, economic development planners, educators, students, and community members to...


Grounding Futures in Pasts: Eastern Pequot Community Archaeology in Connecticut (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katherine Sebastian Dring. Stephen Silliman. Natasha Gambrell. Ralph Sebastian Sidberry.

Collaborations between archaeologists and Native communities have expanded significantly in the past 20 years. For most, this is recognized as an important and healthy development on methodological, theoretical, practical, and political grounds, especially when anchored deeply in the communities themselves and designed to address political as well as professional issues. We have worked together in different capacities for more than 13 years on the Eastern Pequot Archaeological Field School, a...


Maya Peasantry: Crop Diversity Past and Present (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mario Zimmermann.

For several years, peasant communities on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, have not produced high enough maize-yields to sustain populations in the area. This is despite the fact that modern-day demographics are considerably lower than population estimates for the heights of Maya cultural development during the pre-Columbian era. Some scholars have argued that maize was not the sole staple for the ancient Maya. Root and tree crops are among the candidates for alternative staples given their...


Satisfying and Reflecting on the Urge to Evaluate in Public Archaeology (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katharine Ellenberger. Lorna-Jane Richardson.

The only way to know if archaeological outreach and community engagement is working is to ask. We need to ask the right questions, to the right people, and incorporate that feedback into our work. Yet evaluation is a fraught pursuit. When directing our projects directly at, and working with, the public, our projects are ever more embedded in the politics of cultural heritage and reverberate throughout the communities where we work. Archaeologists and heritage workers have been struggling with...