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Funerary (Other Keyword)

1-6 (6 Records)

Hesten i nordisk jernalder. Ei kontekstuell analyse av den symbolske sfære kontra den materielle røynda (2000)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 423973] K Oma.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the EXARC Bibliography, originally compiled by Roeland Paardekooper, and updated. Most of these records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us using the...


In Death Do We Join: Community Building in Ancient Ethiopian Funerary Practices (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 396717] Dil Basanti.

Aksum was the capital of northern Ethiopian kingdom that is famous for its numerous pre-Christian funerary stelae dating to the first four centuries A.D. The six largest stelae employ a peculiar "house" symbolism carved into their surfaces. Art historians have also noted that later Christian churches in the Ethiopian highlands, also sites for burial, mimic the layouts of old Aksumite elite houses. Beyond this, there has been little serious interpretation on what the "house" symbolism indicates...


An Inland Response to ‘Orientalization’: Funerary Ritual and Local Practice in Central Italy (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 431745] Jessica Nowlin.

Greater trade and connectivity has often been associated with changes in cultural practice. This is particularly the case for the Orientalizing period for which the traditional view holds that objects, ideas and practices from the eastern Mediterranean exerted tremendous influence on local Italian communities during the 8th and 7th centuries BCE. This paper articulates the subtle differences between the presence of imported objects, changes in material culture, and alterations in cultural...


The Philistine Cemetery at Ashkelon:funerary remains and mortuary practice (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 429948] Janling Fu. Sherry Fox. Rachel Kalisher. Kathryn Marklein. Adam Aja.

During the 2013-6 seasons, an extramural cemetery was discovered at the coastal site of Ashkelon in Israel. Dated almost entirely to the Iron IIA period, more than 200 sets of remains were exposed and excavated, providing for the first time a secure and sizeable number of burials from which to generate an understanding of Philistine burial practices and mortuary ritual. The majority of bodies were found in primary inhumation with various depositional practices observed, among them simple pit,...


Rida de döda. Vikingatida bett i Valsgärde och Birka (1992)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 423972] A Sundkvist.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the EXARC Bibliography, originally compiled by Roeland Paardekooper, and updated. Most of these records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us using the...


A Tale of Two Tombs: the relationship between Khonsu's funerary monument and that of Userhat (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 395713] Deanna Kiser-Go.

Egypt is well known for its long-running funerary traditions, and one of the most fruitful avenues of research on the topic is the study of decorated tombs at the ancient site of Thebes (modern Luxor). The cemetery complex that served this large settlement and religious center during the New Kingdom (ca. 1550-1070 BCE) contains thousands of graves. This paper examines two nearly contemporaneous tombs that although commissioned to hold the burials of different men, have a great deal in...

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America