Outreach (Other Keyword)

1-25 (53 Records)

3D Printing for Maritime Cultural Heritage: A Design for All Approach (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne E. Wright.

This is an abstract from the "Technology in Terrestrial and Underwater Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. This research examines issues in accessibility to maritime cultural heritage. Using the Pillar Dollar Wreck, this research presents an approach to public outreach based on the concept of Design for All. Design for All advocates creating products that are accessible and functional for all users. As a part of this project, an exhibit...


Admiring the Hush Arbor: Confronting Slavery in the American South (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael B Thomin. Tristan J Harrenstein.

This is an abstract from the "The Public and Our Communities: How to Present Engaging Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In March 2017, the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) North Central regional office created a new public program called "Admiring the Hush Arbor." A hush arbor was a meeting place, usually secret, that took place outdoors where enslaved African-Americans practiced religious traditions and served as a framework...


Ancient Plazas for Modern Cities: A Role for Archaeology in City Planning Today (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer Wildt.

For thousands of years, plazas have served as spaces for public gatherings. Modern plazas continue to serve many of the same functions as ancient plazas, providing a foundation for comparative studies. Archaeologists have begun to recognize the importance of incorporating modern studies of public spaces into their work, but in order for archaeology to remain relevant, we must engage with and contribute to studies of the modern world. It is necessary for us to work with scholars in these fields...


Archaeological Practice as Science Communication (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Leonor Medeiros.

For long archaeology has relied on its inherited connections with pop culture and images of adventure and discovery, but as generations pass archaeology has to make a renewed effort to capture the public’s attention and interest. This situation is not exclusive to archaeology and has resulted in a strong investment in science communication in Europe, but our field has remained quite unrepresented on its developments.  Through my experience as national winner of the science competition Famelab,...


Archaeology Fairs: Measuring Informal Learning (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebekah Schields. Nichole Tramel. Erika Malo.

Archaeology Fairs are held across the United States in honor of Archaeology month and the International Day of Archaeology. Students and families are exposed to many facets of archaeology, tools of the trade, the difference between archaeology and paleontology, and what to do when they find artifacts. Often this learning takes place in an informal setting, a museum or university campus. So what are students actually learning at these Archaeology Fairs and how can we measure their understanding?...


Archaeology Non-Profits and Community Programs: The Struggle to Keep Archaeology Important in the Eyes of the Public (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra Jones.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeology Non-Profits and Community Programs: The Struggle to Keep Archaeology Important in the Eyes of the Public" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Community outreach and education is an often overlooked area in the field of archaeology. While cultural resource management and academic archaeology produce large amounts of raw and interpretive data, the dissemination of that data to the public is often over looked....


Assessing the Efficacy of Lesson Modules as a Public Education and Outreach Strategy for Archaeology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mario Battaglia. John Murray.

Archaeological education and outreach is becoming ever more of a priority in a discipline that struggles to make research accessible and relevant to diverse publics. In recent years, this void has begun to be filled through the creation of grade school lesson modules on various archaeological topics. However, though these modules are readily available, little has been done to assess the efficacy of such an educational outreach strategy. To address this gap, a study conducted in collaboration...


Back to School: A Review of the Southeast Archeological Center’s Focused Efforts in the Fields of Outreach, Education, Engagement and Relevancy (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Thadra Stanton.

This is an abstract from the "NPS Archeology: Engaging the Public through Education and Recreation" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. On-going efforts to increase outreach, education, engagement and relevancy for the Southeast Archeological Center (SEAC) over the past 8 years have resulted in the increased visibility of SEAC, the National Park Service, and archeology. SEAC has worked with educators through the Teacher-Ranger-Teacher program to...


"The Best Conference I’ve Ever Been to": A Case Study in Science Communication Training (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Schneider.

In 2013, a group of Harvard graduate students launched ComSciCon—a science communication workshop for graduate students—with the goal of empowering young scientists to share research in their field with broad and diverse audiences. Each year since, 50 graduate students have come together every summer to spend three days undergoing intensive science communication training, interacting with expert panelists, and composing original pieces for publication. This paper provides an overview of...


Binghamton University and the NYSDOT: A Focus on Research and Outreach (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nina Versaggi.

For over 40 years, the Public Archaeology Facility, Binghamton University (SUNY) has benefited from an uninterrupted relationship with the New York Department of Transportation through projects administered by the NYS Education Department & New York State Museum. This started out as a non-competitive partnership with some SUNY campuses but became a competitive bidding situation about 20 years ago. The underlying principles of the contract call for a research focus that makes archaeological...


Community Archaeology and Collaborative Interpretation at a Rosenwald School (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Love. Emma Mason.

Of more than 5,000 Rosenwald Schools built during the 20th century in the southern United States, the Fairview School in Cave Spring, Georgia was constructed to provide an educational facility for the local African-American community. Following the site’s rediscovery in 2009, the local Cave Spring community and alumni of Fairview have spearheaded efforts to preserve and interpret Fairview’s historic campus. Most of the buildings located on the Fairview campus were demolished, originally...


Connecting Communities to Place: Public Archaeology at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Horton.

The National Park Service (NPS) pursues multiple opportunities to partner with community organizations and engage the public in our ongoing archaeological and historical research program at Fort Vancouver in southwest Washington. Our focus is to increase our understanding of the people who lived at this multicomponent historical archaeological site. The park forms a large portion of the Vancouver National Historic Reserve, which is significant for its role as the headquarters for Hudson’s Bay...


Connecting People and The Past: Interpreting The Conservation of The USS Monitor (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kathleen M. Sullivan.

Underwater archaeological sites are typically inaccessible to the general public. The public’s interaction with such sites occurs through connections made with excavated artifacts. However, the conservation of these artifacts, especially if they come from a marine environment, can take decades. Interpreting conservation to the public promotes understanding of the lengthy treatment process, thereby fostering support for the project and creating a connection to the artifacts and their history. USS...


Coronation Wreck Visitor Trail - A New Approach to Outreach and Protected Wrecks in the UK (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Roger Crook.

The Coronation, a 90-gun second rate, is a protected wreck site off Plymouth. In 1691 she foundered in a violent gale. Like the majority of protected wrecks in the UK, there is a wealth of history and archaeology to be gleaned most often by archaeologists. To regular sports divers, the 61 in the UK have often been deemed off limits, encouraging the notion of "ivory towers academics". Not any longer: Ginge Crook, the licensee of the site, has significantly changed this attitude in just...


A Diamond Trowel: Minecrafting Archaeology at Fort St. Joseph (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James B Schwaderer.

The development of digital technology is transforming society, including archaeology, in new and ever-expanding ways. From theodolites and GIS to informational databases and ion dating, the technological boom of the twenty-first century has provided new tools that increase the precision and complexity of archaeological analysis. The use of digital media by the average person has exploded, and such technologies provide new and intriguing avenues to reach and educate the public about archaeology....


‘Digging in the Dirt? I Can Do That!’ Archaeology in Middle Level Education (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew R Beaupre.

With the increasing concentration in American archaeology on public education and outreach, archeologists are being asked to adapt educational programs to a number of different audiences. Perhaps the most critical of these is the middle schooler. Trapped between the basic skill development of primary school and the content heavy standards of high school, the contentious liminality of middle level education is combined with the turbulent years of adolescence to create an audience starved for...


Digital Exhibits without the Developer: Technological Tools for Museum Outreach (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kami L Ahrens.

This is an abstract from the "Technology and Public Outreach" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. This presentation will utilize two case studies to examine the uses and effectiveness of various existing digital tools to create online exhibits for museum collections. The Steamboat Bertrand artifacts, an archaeological collection housed at DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri Valley, Iowa, and material culture from the Foxfire Museum and...


Enhancing Archaeology Education and Outreach in Iowa through Project Archaeology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lynn Alex. Elizabeth Reetz.

Iowa has been an active partner in Project Archaeology since 2002, joining at a time when the national program was redefining its mission, recreating its curriculum, and expanding its partnerships. This presented the opportunity to assist in determining the scope and direction of national Project Archaeology while remaining cognizant of the challenges Iowa would face as a state where curriculum decisions are locally determined. Thirteen years later, Iowa PA has a stable foothold with dedicated...


Expanding the Historical Archaeology of College Hill: Updates in Excavation, Digital Technologies, and Outreach in Providence, Rhode Island (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eve H Dewan.

The Archaeology of College Hill is a course at Brown University, taught by two graduate students, that aims to train undergraduates in various field methods, documentary research, and readings and discussions of archaeological theory. In 2016, the course underwent several exciting changes. First, it relocated from Brown’s campus, where it had been conducting excavations for several years, to the nearby Moses Brown School. This paper presents the results of two seasons of fieldwork at this new...


Exploring Strategies for Talking to the Public: Learning from 10 Years of the Florida Public Archaeology Network (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kassie Kemp.

The last 10 years of outreach and education has allowed staff from the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) to experiment with many different strategies for discussing archaeology with the public. Through this experience we have become better aware of the ways to effectively communicate archaeological concepts and garner an appreciation for our archaeological and historic heritage. This presentation will provide some basic strategies and outline specific programming that we have found...


Feasts for the People, Crumbs for the Bird: Communicating Archaeological Data on Ancient Crop Diversity (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mario Zimmermann. Gabriel Ortiz A la triste.

This is an abstract from the "Advancing Public Perceptions of Sustainability through Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Food security and food adequacy are at the core of many sustainability debates. Growing urban populations and a simultaneous decline in staple crops are severe threats to both. While the relation between rising demographics and subsistence has been a focus of scholarly debate in anthropology, crop diversity in ancient...


Finding Our Place: Uncovering Queer Hidden Heritage in the U.S. with the National Park Service (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Leslie Crippen.

LGBTQ history can be traced throughout the vast landscape and diverse material culture of our country, from the tribes of North America, to some of the first-established European forts, to the civil rights struggles that have helped shape our modern world. As part of the National Park Service’s LGBTQ Heritage Initiative, researchers and community members have collaborated to create the Map of Places with LGBTQ Heritage, a visual representation of archaeological and above ground sites that...


The Heritage Education Network: From Individual Efforts to Professional Action (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carol Ellick.

The force behind public outreach and archaeological education has been individuals within agencies, those who’ve formed committees, and those who have dedicated their professional careers ensuring that we communicate beyond ourselves. However, after 30 years, this "profession" still basically exists at the whim of professional organizations and volunteer committees, and through dedicated individuals. In 2015, at the Archaeological Institute of America sponsored Educators’ Conference in New...


Historic Archaeology at Work: Rehabilitating Our Past and Present to Secure Our Future (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Cori Rich. Jane Bigham. Ian Fricker. Alison Shepherd. Peter Quantock. Jessica Mundt. Julie Powers. Guilliam Hurte Sr..

In response to the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt put millions to work by way of the Works Progress Administration (WPA).  Similar to the efforts made by the WPA, the Veterans Curation Program (VCP) is addressing the unemployment rate for recently separated veterans by providing vocational training and temporary employment, while simultaneously providing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) with the means to rehabilitate its archaeological collections to Federal standards.  Now the...


Ho! To the Land of Sunshine: Mitigation and Public Outreach for the BNSF Abó Canyon Double Track Project in Central New Mexico and The Ute Lake Subdivision Project in Northeastern New Mexico: Lawsuits, Artifacts, and an Archaeological Right-of-Entry Agreement (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chris Parrish.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Regulatory Program initially served a fairly simple, straightforward purpose: to protect and maintain the navigable capacity of the nation's waters. Time, changing public needs, evolving policy, case law, and new statutory mandates have changed the purview of the program, adding to its breadth, complexity, and authority. Prior to the issuance or authorization of any Department of the Army permit under Corps regulatory authorities (e.g. the Clean Water...