Colonisation (Other Keyword)

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Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology Volume 01
PROJECT Uploaded by: Penny Crook

Archive of papers from Volume 1 of the Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology, published by the Australian Society for Historical Society (ASHA) in 1983.


Between radicalism and tolerance: Characterising the rule of a militarised Christian theocracy in the medieval Baltic (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Aleksander Pluskowski.

The Teutonic Order, the last of the major military orders founded in the Holy Land in the twelfth century, developed a strong, centralised hierarchy once it redirected its efforts to crusading in the Baltic. After the initial period of crusading was over, its fortified monasteries were built with consistent regularity, and the Order adopted a top-down, corporate approach to controlling the conquered territories, under the leadership of the Grand Master. However, despite this centralisation,...


Core-Hinterland dynamics in New Zealand Archaeology (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Greig. Richard Walter.

This is an abstract from the "Rethinking Hinterlands in Polynesia" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The concept of ‘hinterland’ encompasses ideas of distance, marginality and challenge and is often contrasted with ‘core’, which in turn implies centrality and resource richness. In this paper we address the applicability of both these concepts in New Zealand and examine their role in understanding long-term Maori history. We suggest that high...


Different but similar? Colonisation processes on islands and continents compared (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Spriggs.

As discussed elsewhere (Spriggs 2008) the ‘islands as laboratories’ trope can be overblown, and factors beyond size, circumscription and vulnerability have to be taken into consideration. Indeed none of these are concerns uniquely limited to islands. In this paper I stress too that colonisation on its own may be too limited a concern. We need to examine longer archaeological sequences for a truly comparative archaeology, where what happens after initial colonisation is also key to understanding....


Exploring the limits of the island Anthropocene: the Norse colonisation of Greenland in an Atlantic context. (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Dugmore. Jette Arneborg. Christian Madsen. Tom McGovern. Rowan Jackson.

The medieval Norse colonisation of Greenland was unique, but we can use this completed experiment to explore key drivers of, and limits to, the ‘island Anthropocene’. The indigenous biota of Greenland while sensitive, lacks the fragility of small, isolated low latitude oceanic islands rich in endemic species. The timing of Norse settlement was determined by the patterns and process of island colonisation to the east combined with a suitable environmental and economic window of opportunity. The...


A house transformed, culture and architecture in early modern Offaly (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James I. Lyttleton.

The degree to which cultural, economic and social change in early modern Ireland was inspired by English colonial models can be questioned, though it is undeniable that material practices were evolving among the native and planter communities under the influence of capitalism, humanism and religious change. Such processes impacted upon both vernacular and formal architecture, with changes in the materials, forms, and layouts of buildings marking the degree to which people of different cultural...


Island colonization and ecological transformation in prehistoric eastern Africa (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicole Boivin. Mary Prendergast. Jillian Swift. Ceri Shipton. Alison Crowther.

Until recently, the small islands lying off the coasts of Tanzania and Kenya have seen little systematic archaeological investigation. Their biogeographic diversity, reflecting various processes and chronologies of formation, nonetheless offers an ideal opportunity to examine processes of prehistoric colonization and anthropogenic impact.We explore the earliest evidence for human activity on three different islands, Pemba, Zanzibar and Mafia, and provide the first evidence for early human...


Landscape Stability, Environmental Resilience and Anthropocene Transformations in Iceland (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Dugmore. Richard Streeter.

Before the Norse settlement, Iceland was characterised by substantial areas of birch woodland in sheltered valleys, highland willow tundra and birch-willow scrub extending into more exposed areas of upland, coast, and marginal wetlands. Terrestrial mammals had been extirpated by the Quaternary glaciations. Aeolian sediment accumulation rates were low and correlated over kilometre–scales. Rapid colonisation by the Norse (perhaps 20,000 settlers in less than 30 years) and their introduction of...


Missions at the Margin: excavating the London Missionary Society in Botswana (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ceri Z Ashley.

The activities of the London Missionary Society (LMS) in Botswana are widely known thanks to the popular writings and high profiles of pioneers such as John Moffat and David Livingstone. The role of archaeology within such discourse may thus appear redundant. However, as widely recognised within the discipline, the scope and scale of archaeology, and in particular its focus on the mundane and everyday, has the potential to add a new dimension to our historical understanding of early Missions in...


Redressing Power: Road Building in British Colonial Cyprus (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin S.L. Gibson.

Road building has always been essential to the process of colonisation. In Cyprus, British Colonial road building was part of a larger project to secure and civilise the island and its population, making it a model for how other countries should be administered in the Near East. The construction of roads between 1880 and 1900 focussed on establishing security and bringing order to the landscape and its people. In this presentation I focus on the multifaceted dimensions of the construction, use...


Representing and Negotiating Moche Identity in Everyday Life (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erell Hubert.

Material culture used in daily practices plays a crucial role in mediating personal experiences, social identities, and wider socio-political phenomena. Based on my doctoral dissertation, I more specifically explore the ways miniature anthropomorphic figures used mostly in domestic contexts participated in the negotiation of the identities of Moche colonists settling in the Santa Valley (north coast of Peru) between the fifth and the ninth century AD. Figurines in particular seem to have played...


Ritual Practices and the Negotiation of Wari-Tiwanaku Relations at Cerro Baúl (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erell Hubert. Patrick R. Williams. Lauren Monz. M. Elizabeth Grávalos.

The presence of both Wari and Tiwanaku colonies in the Moquegua Valley (southern Peru) offers a unique opportunity to study the colonial strategies of these empires and their interactions during the first millennium AD. Here, we more specifically explore the role of ritual practices in mediating relations between the Wari and Tiwanaku empires. We focus on a Titicaca basin inspired platform and court complex located outside of the main Wari administrative sector of the site of Cerro Baúl,...


A Social Perspective on Wood Remains: Rural Colonisation and Urban Growth in the Saint Lawrence Valley, 1600-1900 AD (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brad Loewen. Christian Bélanger. Marie-Claude Brien. Charles Dagneau. Alex Lefrançois-Leduc.

Dendrochronology is widely used as a dating tool in archaeology. In North America, the wood record is especially associated with colonial dynamics when farmlands were cleared, rural buildings were erected and young cities drew upon timber resources from expanding hinterlands. In the Saint Lawrence Valley, colonisation began in the early seventeenth century and developed in waves, as prime agricultural lands were saturated and became launching pads for secondary colonisation into marginal regions...


A Social Perspective on Wood Remains: Rural Colonisation and Urban Growth in the Saint Lawrence Valley, 1600-1900 AD (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brad Loewen. Christian Bélanger. Marie-Claude Brien. Charles Dagneau. Alex Lefrançois-Leduc.

Dendrochronology is widely used as a dating tool in archaeology. In North America, the wood record is especially associated with colonial dynamics when farmlands were cleared, rural buildings were erected and young cities drew upon timber resources from expanding hinterlands. In the Saint Lawrence Valley, colonisation began in the early seventeenth century and developed in waves, as prime agricultural lands were saturated and became launching pads for secondary colonisation into marginal regions...


The Swiss Family Robinson and the archaeology of colonisations (1983)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Judy M Birmingham. Denis Jeans.

Australian historical archaeology is now at a stage of development where it is essential that we pause and ask ourselves: 'What are we doing and why are we doing it?' In this paper Judy Birmingham of the Department of Archaeology, University of Sydney, and Denis Jeans of the Department of Geography, University of Sydney, strongly advocate an explicit problem-oriented approach to our subject matter rather than merely descriptive data collection. Clearly, Australian historical archaeology offers...


Towards the development of colonial archaeology in New Zealand: Part 1 (1983)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Peter J F Coutts.

In this, the first of two papers, Peter Coutts, Director of the Victoria Archaeological Survey, writes about part of his work in New Zealand some years ago. In New Zealand, as also in Australia, historical archaeologists are faced with the problem of constructing a usable data base, comprising both documentary and archaeological material, on which future research workers can draw. In the following paper this task is attempted for the New Zealand building industry in the 19th century. Other...