Personhood (Other Keyword)

1-9 (9 Records)

The Dead’s Vitality: Maintaining Souls in Virginia Communities (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alison Bell.

Solar-powered bulbs and flapping-winged ladybugs, wind chimes, whirligigs, jack-o-lanterns, valentines to the deceased, and much else adorn gravesites in the Valley of Virginia. A 2003 bowling trophy sits on the headstone of a person who died in 2001. A stuffed rabbit faces another stone and holds recent photos of children, as if showing them to the buried teen. These objects relate not only to the deceased’s personal histories and interests but also represent gestures, through exchange and...


In Death Do We Join: Community Building in Ancient Ethiopian Funerary Practices (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dil Basanti.

Aksum was the capital of northern Ethiopian kingdom that is famous for its numerous pre-Christian funerary stelae dating to the first four centuries A.D. The six largest stelae employ a peculiar "house" symbolism carved into their surfaces. Art historians have also noted that later Christian churches in the Ethiopian highlands, also sites for burial, mimic the layouts of old Aksumite elite houses. Beyond this, there has been little serious interpretation on what the "house" symbolism indicates...


Mortuary Theatrics and Chiefly Power in Panama and Costa Rica (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott Palumbo. Laura Brodie.

This paper explores the mechanisms by which sumptuary art was deposited in mortuary contexts in parts of southern Central America. Rather than signal the existence of ”eliteness” or chiefly office, it is argued that the production and procurement of mortuary art was one feature of a factionalized political landscape. The burial of staggering quantities of this artwork may be interpreted as deflationary attempts to limit the capital available to rivals. Such practices may have promoted a...


Native Mortuary Customs and Knowledge Networks in 18th-Century Massachusetts (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kathleen J. Bragdon.

This paper looks at wills written by and for Wampanoag people in their own language and in English and their relation to other native mortuary customs in the eighteenth century. I argue that while writing wills was an innovative practice adopted by Christian Indians and suggests a breakdown in native community structure in the eighteenth century, the practice was consistent with other evidence for strong community identification.  Knowledge of the "writing culture" of southern New...


Network Approaches to Cosmopolitanism in Ancient Ethiopia (50-700 AD) (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dil Basanti.

This paper looks at how ideas of cosmopolitanism can be applied to the African context using Aksum (50-700 AD) in northern Ethiopia as case study. While there is much interest in issues of cosmopolitanism, or the making of a "world citizen" or a "world community" as drawn from 18th-19th century conceptualizations, such issues become difficult to study on the African continent given the strong emphasis on personhoods configured around local, corporate contexts. Burial practices from ancient Aksum...


Osteobiography as Local Biology (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jo Appleby.

Osteobiography is an increasingly popular approach, but one that can have the effect of producing unproblematised, individualised approaches to the life course. In this paper I wish to explore how we can create a theoretically informed osteobiography. I propose two strands to this. Firstly, rather than osteobiography being something that ‘happens to’ individuals living in a society, I suggest that it constantly emerges through inter-relations with culturally specific understandings of the person...


Persons and Mortuary Practices in the Native Northeast (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John L. Creese. Kathleen Bragdon.

The incorporation of the dead into the social practices of the living – as revealed by mortuary practices in the Native Northeast – is especially relevant to current archaeological theories of materiality, value, and consumption. This paper presents comparative data from southern New England Algonquian and northern Iroquoian societies to argue that mass burials (including ossuaries and cemeteries) typical of sixteenth and seventeenth century Northeastern aboriginal societies reflected new...


Processing Personhood: Mortuary Activity from the Middle to Late Woodland in the Lower Illinois River Valley (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brittany Fletcher. Aliya Hoff. Samuel Mijal. Jason King. Jane E. Buikstra.

While archaeological engagement with the body as a locus of embodied agency has proliferated in recent years, this study is the first to rigorously apply theories of personhood to the lengthy burial rituals documented within interment facilities of Woodland burial mounds from the North American Midcontinent. This study aims to explore conceptions of the body, dividuality, embodiment, and personhood through the analysis of skeletal material from the Middle Woodland Gibson Mounds Site (n=19) and...


Stone Bodies and Second Lives: Preserving the Person in Ancient Ethiopia (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dil Basanti.

Aksum, the capital of an ancient northern Ethiopian kingdom (50-700 AD), is well known for its elaborate funerary stelae, the largest of which were carved in the impression of multi-storied “houses.” Prior to a widespread conversion to Christianity, the Aksumites buried their dead in kin-groups either in tombs or in shafts that cluster around the stelae. Human remains are often burned, fragmentary, disarticulated and jumbled, creating an impression of ephemeralness that contrasts with the...