Arkansas (Other Keyword)

1-13 (13 Records)

The Creole Village: Trans-Mississippi French Culture in the 19th Century (2021)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew R. Beaupre.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Shifting Borders: Early-19th Century Archeology in the Trans-Mississippi South" , at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In the 1830s, author Washington Irving traveled the Arkansas River, visiting the settlement at Arkansas Post and the new territorial capital of Little Rock. Irving recorded his observations of Arkansas Post in a short essay entitled ‘The Creole Village'. In this work, Irving describes a ‘serene...


Discovering Leetown: A Small Hamlet’s Role in the Battle of Pea Ridge and Beyond. (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Victoria Jones. Jamie Brandon.

Leetown, a nineteenth century hamlet now within Pea Ridge Military Park in Northwest Arkansas was investigated during the University of Arkansas’ summer 2017 field school. The preliminary study of Leetown was a cooperative effort between the University of Arkansas, the Arkansas Archeological Survey, and National Park Service’s Midwest Archeological Center. The goal of both the geophysical and excavations were to identify what buildings and roads were located in the hamlet―from the Civil War...


Early Historic Salt-making Sites in South Arkansas (2021)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Beverly J. Watkins.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Shifting Borders: Early-19th Century Archeology in the Trans-Mississippi South" , at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. South central and southwest Arkansas both have an abundance of salt licks, salt springs, salt creeks, and salt marshes. Indigenous people established a number of sites for making salt, and early American settlers developed some of these sites into commercial saltworks. Smaller than the industrial...


The Edge of the World: Settlement, Production, and Trade in Early American Southwest Arkansas (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carl Carlson-Drexler.

The Atlantic World is usually used to focus on sites in the Chesapeake or other Eastern Seaboard loci of early settlement. By many reckonings, however, the Atlantic World endured well into the 19th century, and, if we take as a definition of the Atlantic World a focus on marine trade between the colonies and colonizers, then we must cast a much wider net. The earliest stages of settlement in the Trans-Mississippi South would certainly be included here. This paper explores the settlement of...


Excavations at Historic Jacksonport State Park (3JA53) (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only C. Andrew Buchner.

  The town of Jacksonport, Arkansas was established in the late 1830s near the confluence of the White and Black rivers, and rose to prominence during the 1850s to 1870s as a key steamboat town and as the Jackson County seat.  However, after being bypassed by the railroad the town declined and by 1892, it was largely deserted.   In 2009, the planned construction of a collection management facility lead to data recovery excavations within two town lots, as well as the recovery of detailed...


Expanding the Carceral State: The Early Penitentiaries of Louisiana and Arkansas (2021)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brett J. Derbes.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Shifting Borders: Early-19th Century Archeology in the Trans-Mississippi South" , at the 2021 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. As the United States expanded westward the frontier attracted new settlers, including criminals.  Throughout the early 1800s state legislatures revised their criminal codes and shifted from corporal punishment to incarceration.  In early 1832, Louisiana Governor Andre B. Roman called for a new...


Hands of Mercy: Methods of Healing Practice by Frontier Nuns (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Breanna M Wilbanks.

This is an abstract from the "Constructing Bodies and Persons: Health and Medicine in Historic Social Context" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In the 19th century, nuns of the Sisters of Mercy traveled to Fort Smith, Arkansas, the border of the U.S. and Indian Territory, to establish a convent and school for the burgeoning frontier town. With an ever-growing population and few doctors to meet the medical demands of the people, the Sisters served...


Historic Cherokee Settlements in the Arkansas River Valley (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only C. Andrew Buchner.

After the American Revolutionary War disrupted Native American groups were pushed westward, and among these were Cherokee who settled in the Arkansas River Valley beginning in the 1790s.  Their population peaked during 1818-1828, after which they resettled farther west in Indian Territory.  Archaeological evidence for the Arkansas Cherokee sites has been slow to come to light, because the sites were so briefly occupied and exhibit low artifact densities.  Additionally, because the Arkansas...


Learn by Doing: Sharpening Understanding of Archeologists and Sites Among Diverse Publics with Hands On Activities in Arkansas (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann Early.

Most people have unformed ideas about what archeologists really do; collector of stuff, oddball academic, dinosaur hunter, rock expert, 'save the planet' enthusiast, expert about dead people and dead societies. Poor understanding breeds scatter shot ideas about the 'values' of archeological sites for science, history, or heritage. In Arkansas, hands-on collaboration showing how archeologists learn things, and how ancient people made a living, tried out with replicas of archeological specimens,...


Mercy in a Town Without: Catholic Nurses and their Medical Care in a Frontier Town (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Breanna M Wilbanks.

From Ireland to Fort Smith, the Sisters of Mercy parish was established by Bishop Andrew Byrne, along with five devout female recruits, to support the Church of Immaculate Conception which would be the first Catholic place of worship in what was considered the "wild" westernmost portion of the United States.The Sisters of Mercy site, (3SB1083) was occupied from its establishment in 1853 up to present day, where it hosts several schools, outbuildings, and a cathedral and acts still today as a...


"Old Al's Going To Get It," At Least For A While: Recent Riverine Archaeology in Arkansas (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Leslie C. Stewart-Abernathy.

To understand Arkansas history, it is constructive to study the use of the extensive network of navigable waterways in and near the State. In the last 30 years, archaeologists have documented recovered Native American canoes, as well as researched vessels employed from the Trail of Tears in the 1830s to the end of the Wooden Age in the 1930s. A major step was at West Memphis on the Mississippi in 1988, when record low water permitted professionals and amateurs to use dry-land field techniques to...


Sultana: Greatest Maritime Tragedy in United States History: A Nation's Best Kept Secret (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lindsay S Scott.

The disaster of Sultana has been recognized as the greatest maritime tragedy in United States history.  The wreck has little notoriety, despite its significance, due to historical overshadowing and a terminal resting place in the landlocked state of Arkansas.  Efforts for salvage were immediate, but archaeological undertakings have been cautious and sporadic.  An unwelcoming landscape and lack of interest and funding have consorted so that as we approach the sesquicentennial anniversary of...


Toward an Archaeology of French Settlement in the Arkansas River Valley: Chasing the Arkansas Post in the Documentary and Archaeological Records. (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Beaupre.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Comparative Perspectives on European Colonization in the Americas: Papers in Honor of Réginald Auger" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In 1686, while in an attempt to rendezvous with René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, Henri de Tonti established the "Poste de Arkansea" at the Quapaw village of Osotouy. Garrisoned by a handful of adventurers, the Arkansas Post was the first ‘semi-permanent’ French...