place (Other Keyword)

1-10 (10 Records)

Beyond the Overseer’s House: Centering the Stories of the Enslaved Community at White Hill Plantation (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexis Morris. Julia Steele.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Northeast Region National Park Service Archeological Landscapes and the Stories They Tell" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Of the larger 18th century plantations overlooking the Appomattox River, White Hill was positioned on the edge of the city of Petersburg, Virginia. The preservation and interpretation of White Hill Plantation is on the fringes of the enabling legislation that established Petersburg...


Finding a Home in the Global Shtetl: The Archaeology of Jewish Placemaking in the Diaspora (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David M Markus.

Jews in the 17th - 19th Centuries lived perpetual ‘others,’ their lives typified by displacement, often through forced exile or social and economic ostracization. These individuals exemplified life in the Diaspora, defining their experience in juxtaposition to the regions where they lived. They marked their identity as being members of a global Jewish community all the while assimilating to the societal norms of their temporary homelands. The archaeology of the Jewish communities in North...


Nets of Memory (Líonta na Cuimhne): Islander Mediations of Remembrance and Belonging (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ian Kuijt. William Donaruma.

Migration is, above all else, a dissociative event that fundamentally challenges an individuals sense of home and identity. To a 19th century Irish islander living in America, a fishing net was not just an economic tool, or object, or asset; rather it provided a point of entry into the emotional landscape of memory, belonging, and place. Emigrates from rural settings traveled to America to establish better lives for themselves, their relatives, and their future offspring, often in new and very...


Placemaking in Southwestern Oregon (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily Helmer.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This study takes a Geographic Information Systems approach to understanding the role of place in determining settlement patterns in southwestern Oregon. Persistent use of settlement locations transforms these spaces to places, or locations where memory and identity become embedded. In order to test how this phenomena influences settlement location, a site...


Reclaiming Memory of Those Unknown: An Archaeological Study of the African-American Cemetery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph A. Downer.

This paper discusses the ongoing archaeological survey of the African-American Cemetery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon. Ultimately, this project was designed to bring about a better understanding of this space on the plantation landscape and to honor those unknown who call this spot their final resting place. Through the use of this space, it is believed that a portion of Mount Vernon’s enslaved population was able to culturally resist their imposed social position through the reinforcement...


Sacrificial Landscapes and the Anatomy of Moche Biopolitics (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Edward Swenson.

Power in Moche society was fundamentally biopolitical, expressed through the violent deconstruction and reconstruction of bodies, including animate places. An examination of Moche architecture reveals that North Coast populations envisioned built environments as living organisms that were biologically dependent on human communities. The erection and renovation of Moche ceremonial architecture played an instrumental role in the generation of life and the harnessing of vital forces. Therefore,...


Sisneros and Cisneros: Place-Based Community Development Among Hispanic Homesteaders in Northeast New Mexico (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin Hegberg.

In 2016 the Office of Contract Archeology surveyed 9,466 acres of private land in northeast New Mexico. The block survey included several entire homestead allotments belonging to Hispanic families between 1900 and 1940. Due to their location on private land, many of the sites are in relatively pristine condition. Analysis of the sites, architecture, and archival documents was a unique opportunity to understand how these dispersed Hispanic homesteaders relied on each other and organized into a...


Trade and Mobility in the Late Eighteenth-Century River World of the Western Great Lakes: the Case of Réaume’s Leaf River Post (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amelie Allard.

This paper examines the lived experiences of French Canadian fur traders in the late eighteenth-century western Great Lakes region. Even as they labored under – sometimes actively resisted - the Anglo-Scot masters of the trade, a life of travel away from colonial centers provided an arena for voyageurs to enact and reproduce distinct sets of fur trade practices through the transmission of knowledge on the spot, as well as create a place for themselves at the intersection of British colonial...


The view from above: changing experiences of the built environment during the Andean Late Intermediate Period (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Guengerich.

The highland Andes underwent major transformations in settlement organization between AD1000-1300, in the first half of the Late Intermediate Period. Settlement patterning shifted to higher altitudes, and in some areas, new sites were accompanied by defensive features. Most research has focused on the structural pressures that led to these changes, such as an increase of violence in the wake of Middle Horizon polity collapse, or a shift to pastoralism as a result of climate change. This paper...


What if the place is gone? Reinvigorating Place, Memory, and Identity through New Media (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chris Merritt.

While Utah is not known for its mining heritage, the Bingham Copper MIne located west of Salt Lake City is one of the few human manifestations visible from space. While the massive open-pit is a testament to human engineering, fortitude, and profit, the copper extracted from its stony core brought thousands of immigrants to Utah during the 19th and 20th centuries. These immigrants created places, communities, and a cohesive social identity. The same mines that created their community in the late...