Atlantic World (Other Keyword)

1-11 (11 Records)

Becoming the ‘other’?: Exploring mimetic practice in the Ulster Plantation (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Audrey Horning.

Mimesis involves the interpretation and imitation of behaviour. Crucially, it is a strategy employed not only by the ‘colonised other’, but also by those in authority engaging with and endeavouring to understand the behaviour of those over whom they wielded power. Far from settling an unpopulated colonial wilderness, those few planters who made their way to Ulster in the early seventeenth century were thrust into a populated Gaelic world where their survival depended upon a process of...


Daniel Gookin’s Atlantic World: Comparative Archaeological Landscapes in Ireland and Virginia. (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Luke J. Pecoraro.

This poster illustrates an enhanced comparative approach to understanding colonial projects by using the archaeological biography of Daniel Gookin Jr. (1612-1685), an important but relatively unknown figure involved in English plantation projects in Ireland, Virginia, Maryland, and Massachusetts.  The study of individual biography provides a framework from which to better situate archaeological sites of the seventeenth-century Chesapeake in the greater Atlantic world.  Through creating a broader...


From Beaver Pelt to Hatters' Felt: The Use and Impact of Canadian Beaver on Britain (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael C Bumsted.

Historians and archaeologists in North America have expended much energy studying the fur trade.  The role which beaver played in this is especially well discussed, and the importance that it had to European expansion into the North American interior has been thoroughly examined.  The same cannot be said for what happened to the goods Europeans acquired once they took them back to Europe.  Beaver, and the other Hudson’s Bay Company imports, had social and economic impacts on the British end of...


From Cedar to Stone: Urban Life in Transition in Early Modern Bermuda (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brent Fortenberry.

The town of St. George's served as Bermuda's colonial capital from 1612 to 1815. Over nearly three hundred years, the town flourished as Bermuda transitioned from a restrictive agriculture economy under the Somers Island Company to a powerful maritime economy under the Crown during the Free Holding period. In this paper I explore the changing urban landscape of St. George's from 1684 to 1730 as the town underwent a dramatic rebuilding when the Somers Island Company was dissolved and the town...


Galleons for a Transatlantic World (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jon Adams.

Galleons for a Transatlantic World The late 16th and early 17th centuries was a period in which English shipping saw the emergence of what might be termed a second generation of carvel construction in which the ‘galleon’ was developed from the carrack derivatives and galleases of Henry VIII’s time. Nowhere are these more beautifully portrayed than in Matthew Baker’s Fragments of Ancient English Shipwrightry preserved in the Pepys Library, Magdalene College, Cambridge. But astonishingly the...


Heavy Metal: The Arrival of English Lead Glass in the Chesapeake (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Esther Rimer.

Almost immediately after the perfection of English lead glass in 1676, lead glass appeared on the tables of British colonists, including Chesapeake settlers. The durability and beauty of English lead glass made it a consumer amenity that became a regular sight in upper and middle-class homes and taverns throughout the 18th-century Atlantic World. This paper will compare evidence of lead glass found at pre-1700 and early 18th-century plantations between Maryland and the James River to assess...


Interpreting West Ashcom: Drones, artifacts and archives (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Liza Gijanto.

Archaeology from St. Mary’s College of Maryland began looking for the former homestead of West Ashcom in the Spring of 2012. West Ashcom was established on the south bank of the Patuxent River in what is now St. Mary’s County, MD by John Ashcom in 1651. At its height in the early 18th century it contained a manor house, kitchen, dairy, orchard, port, haberdashery, and various other barns and dependencies. Using traditional sources such as archives and methods like pedestrian surveys and...


New Methods for Comparing Consumer Behavior across Space and Time in the Early Modern Atlantic World (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jillian Galle.

Unlike primary sources, archaeological assemblages can be used to estimate per-capita discard rates that reveal the flow of goods through time and the complexity of purchasing patterns on a range of sites.  In addition to filling these gaps, the archaeological record provides data on individuals and groups not represented in probate inventories and wills, two document types most often used to track consumer habits on both the small and large scale.  Unfortunately measuring and comparing...


Public Spaces For The People: A Preliminary Investigation Of Colonial Taverns And Markets In Charleston, South Carolina (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nathan G.W. Allison.

Early modern British Atlantic world colonial port cities of North America were filled with a diverse cast of individuals and groups. Public space in port cities provided an area for the masses to interact and participate in a variety of activities. This poster will look at public space in Charleston, South Carolina during the long eighteenth-century. As part of a larger project, this analysis will look at taverns and markets, providing a window into the diverse groups and activities that were...


St. Eustatius--The Nexus for Colonial Caribbean Capitalism (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only R. Grant Gilmore.

As the nexus for international trade in the Atlantic World during the latter 18th and early 19th centuries, St. Eustatius provided the single largest and most efficient conduit for people, news, correspondence and trade items during this time.  The material cultural record in both archaeology and architecture reflect the cosmopolitan society geared toward unfettered capitalism in the first free trading port in modern times.  A mix of nationalities, languages and religions found in few places in...


"There and Back Again": The Atlantic World Concept in Historical Archaeology (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Chesney.

The concept of an "Atlantic World" is a useful one for historical archaeologists because it provides a general geographic starting point for investigations that focus on the transformation of the world and the expansion of European imperial networks but defies strict physical, temporal, and cultural boundaries. As the limits of the known world expanded for Europeans and non-Europeans alike, its mysterious edges contracted, and people and places isolated from outside developments became...