diaspora (Other Keyword)

1-22 (22 Records)

Acadian Adaptations in North and South America (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Steven R. Pendery.

The tragedy of the deportation of the Acadians from their homeland by the British in the 1750s was compounded by their exploitation by the French government at the conclusion of the Seven Years War. French imperial policy focused on settling and developing portions of tropical colonies such as French Guiana with Acadians and Europeans in order to minimize slave labor.  Although more than 9,000 colonists perished upon their arrival in La Guyane, a few hundred Acadians survived in extended coastal...


American Made: The Development of Ethnic Identities, Racism, and Economic Growth of the Young American Republic (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordon Loucks.

Ethnic identification in the archaeological record is fraught with pitfalls. The application of ethnic divisions on populations that helped construct the industrial arteries of New York State are a popular lens to view history through. The immigrant populations that gave life and limb to construct the Erie Canal and the New York Railroad system paved the way for the development of the industrial Northeast. This study hopes to evaluate the efficacy of ethnic identification of the archaeological...


The Archaeology of Cassipora Creek: Exploratory Investigations of a 17th-Century Jewish Settlement in Suriname (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Simon Goldstone. David M. Markus.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeologies of Contact and Colonialism" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In the 17th-century, Jewish migrants from Europe began settling in Suriname, where they were granted unprecedented autonomy in governing their community and openly practicing their religion. In 1665, these Jewish settlers established their first synagogue and cemetery along the Cassipora Creek, which would become the namesake of their...


Between Continents, Between Cities: Chinese Diaspora Archaeology in Stanford, California (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Lowman.

Archaeology of the nineteenth century Chinese diaspora in the western United States has revealed networks of travel and trade between urban centers and rural living sites on both sides of the Pacific. Examining sites located between urban and rural settings highlights the frequent trade and travel made by individuals between dispersed communities. A combination of oral history and archaeology uncovers the ties between a late nineteenth-century Chinese community at Stanford, California, to...


Bringing It All Back Home: The Archaeology of Diasporic Homelands (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephen A. Brighton.

In the context of modern history, diaspora is traditionally defined as a reluctant scattering of a large number of people to two or more international locations.  Most studies in the social sciences and humanities have concentrated efforts towards understanding how new experiences and contacts have shaped diasporic groups once away from their homelands. In essence, most studies are structured by the culture continuity/cultural change dynamic in new places of settlement. The established focus of...


Building Diaspora: Surviving and Thriving in the Shadow of Imperialism (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kelly Fong.

In the aftermath of mid-19th century Western imperialist and capitalist expansion in China, the Chinese Diaspora grew beyond Southeast Asia as migrants left southern China for Australia, North America, and South America.  Despite being separated by the Pacific Ocean, these Chinese communities in the United States did not live in isolation.  Instead, they remained highly connected to their home villages and districts in southern China as well as communities throughout the Diaspora through the...


Burying the Sons of Israel in America: Jewish Cemeteries as the Focal Point of Diasporic Community Development (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Simon Goldstone. David M Markus.

Cemeteries are a means of tethering a community to a geographic location. Often this process of placemaking results in the development of a community comprised of a meshwork of individuals from throughout a diaspora. In the case of Jewish populations the establishment of burial grounds are often the first in creating a community that comes together as a result of outside force or lack of a homeland. The commonalities of their religion and shared experiences, both real and imagined, make the...


Casting a Net into the Chinese Diaspora of the Bay Area (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Laurie A. Wilkie.

Until recently, the archaeology of Chinese immigrants and their descendants has been under-theorized and too often, consciously/unconsciously shaped by contemporary racialized discourses.  In this paper, following the lead of historical archaeologist Kelly Fong, this paper will draw upon bodies of theorizing developed in the fields of Ethnic and Critical Race studies to examine the experiences of diaspora among a community of Chinese and Chinese American shrimp fishermen who worked the waters of...


Colonial Impact on Kanaka Maoli Diaspora and Dispersal (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kirsten Vacca.

Hawaiians were historically a mobile population. Their Polynesian ancestors crossed the wide expanse of the Pacific Ocean to settle the Hawaiian archipelago, and the Kanaka Maoli descendants that worked and lived on the land continued this diasporic tradition. By the 17th century, Kanaka Maoli lived in or utilized the many varied ecosystems available to them. Within the moku political districts, the Kanaka Maoli remained highly mobile—moving between the highlands and the lowlands for resources....


Corkonians And Fardowners: Irish Activity And Identity In The Rural American South, 1850-1860 (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amanda B Johnson.

During the 1850s, the Blue Ridge Mountain Railroad Company recruited 2,000 Irish immigrants to work an area 20 miles west of Charlottesville, Virginia, carving out tunnels and cuts for an emerging rail line. The grueling and dangerous work transformed the physical landscape and turned a transient immigrant population into a vibrant semi-settled community. This paper explores the identities of the two groups of Irish laborers involved with the construction of the Blue Ridge Railroad Tunnel, the...


Diasporic Flows and "Dwelling-in-Travel" in Southeastern North America (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles Cobb. Chester B. DePratter.

The establishment of the Carolina colony in AD 1670 prompted a series of population movements toward Charleston among numerous Native American peoples eager to exchange slaves and hides with English colonials. In microcosm, this is a precursor and embodiment of the population flows associated with globalization today. We consider how diasporic movements between Indigenous home territories and the Carolina frontier established a pattern of what James Clifford has referred to as...


Ethnic Markers and Comparative Approaches to the Asian Diaspora (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Ross.

Direct comparisons between Chinese and non-Chinese sites go back decades. However, most current Asian diaspora archaeology focuses on single-household or single-community case studies, with comparative work limited to using ethnically-linked artifacts to explore patterns of cultural persistence and change or present evidence for interethnic interaction with neighboring communities. Here, I argue that we need to spend more time conducting direct and detailed comparisons between households and...


Finding a Home in the Global Shtetl: The Archaeology of Jewish Placemaking in the Diaspora (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David M Markus.

Jews in the 17th - 19th Centuries lived perpetual ‘others,’ their lives typified by displacement, often through forced exile or social and economic ostracization. These individuals exemplified life in the Diaspora, defining their experience in juxtaposition to the regions where they lived. They marked their identity as being members of a global Jewish community all the while assimilating to the societal norms of their temporary homelands. The archaeology of the Jewish communities in North...


Freedom in Florida: Maroons Making Do in the Colonial Borderland (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary Elizabeth Ibarrola.

We define Maroons by their overt resistance; theirs was one of the most extreme forms of anti-slavery resistance in the Americas and for many scholars is representative of the human desire to be free. Maroons removed themselves from the places in which they were enslaved and created new places apart from this brutal existence. However, reducing our understanding of Maroon life to a history of domination and resistance limits the scope of Maroon agency and values certain forms of action, such as...


Genealogical Approaches to Acadian Diaspora Ethnoarchaeology (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Steven R. Pendery.

The Acadian diaspora began in 1755 and involved the sudden deportation of about 6,500 Acadian men, women and children from their homeland in what is now Nova Scotia, Canada. Of these, about 2,650 eventually found their way to Louisiana. Central to the retention of an Acadian identity was the tracking of family genealogies as members became dispersed across three continents. Today, four  Acadian study centers conbtribute to managing this robust literature. However, our understanding of the...


"I Don't Know Where I'm a-Gonna Go When the Volcano Blow": Resettlement, Diaspora, and the Landscapes of Montserrat’s Volcanic Exclusion Zone (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Miriam A. W. Rothenberg.

On July 18th, 1995, after centuries of relative quiet, Montserrat's Soufrière Hills volcano suddenly and violently sprang to life. The months that followed saw a series of evacuations of the southern portions of the island due to the volcanic threat, rendering this landscape—including the capital town of Plymouth—an abandoned 'Exclusion Zone'. By 2000, the majority of the island's population had left more or less permanently, many for the United Kingdom. Those who stayed faced the challenge of...


Indigeneity and Diaspora: Colonialism and the Classification of Displacement (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katherine Hayes.

The terms of indigeneity and diaspora are fixtures in scholarly discussion of colonialism, referring to different sets of relations between "homeland" and identity challenged by colonization.  The two sets of concepts might also be thought of as maintaining incommensurate statuses for American Indians and African Americans, implying radically different historical experiences.  This distinction unfortunately contributes to unhelpful disciplinary and racialized distinctions.  In this paper I...


Locked Up: Archaeological Indications of Immigrant Experience on New York's Canals (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordon Loucks.

This study focuses on the archaeological correlates of the lived experience of immigrant communities that worked along New York's canal systems during the nineteenth century. A part of ongoing dissertation research, this poster is meant to illustrate case studies of the events and pressures of immigrant labor with the goal of fostering a better understanding of New York's industrial, political, and social history. Issues involved in this complex topic include trade agreements and cost...


Moving beyond Cowboys and Indians: Rethinking Colonial Dichotomies into Messy "Frontiers" (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Agha. Jon Marcoux.

As part of its etymological "baggage," the term "frontier" evokes thoughts of action and excitement, conquering the unknown, and transforming the untamed and uncivilized into the managed and controlled. In North American colonial contexts this perspective privileges the experiences of European, colonizers at the interpretive expense of the multitude of other social actors (e.g., enslaved Africans, women, Native Americans) whose practices equally constituted the colonial project. In our paper, we...


On Cudjo’s Pipe: Smoking Dialogs in Diasporic Space (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Neil Norman.

As a survivor of the last slaver to make the Atlantic crossing and a community leader in the Jim Crow-era American South of Mobile Alabama, Cudjo Lewis stands as an iconic diasporic figure.  We know of Cudjo’s life on both sides of the Atlantic from extensive interviews by Zora Neale Hurston, local historians, and reporters from the New York Times.  These reports describe a sullen patriarchal figure who spent the last years of his life morning the death of his children and the impossibility of...


The Quandary Of Diaspora: Folk Culture And African And Scottish Interactions At The Kingsley Plantation (1814-1839), Fort George Island, Florida (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Davidson.

Recognizing ethnic identities through materiality has long been a goal of American historical archaeology, in particular within the African Diaspora.  The ability to identify and interpret archaeologically the material residues of these past social behaviors has most successfully relied upon exclusive contexts of interaction and access; African customs may be "recognized" in slave cabins, while European customs and beliefs may manifest materially within predominately or exclusively Euroamerican...


What Have We Done, What Are We Doing, and Where Are We Going with Overseas Chinese Archaeology? (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Ross.

According to this session’s organizers there is no dominant Overseas Chinese narrative, but rather one characterized by diversity. They perceive this diversity as a strength and seek to highlight the range of both Chinese experiences and recent archaeological approaches to their lives. Papers address topics ranging from lifeways of urban merchants to healthcare practices of rural railroad workers, consumer habits of Chinatown residents, and the role of burned sites in creating highly politicized...