WWI (Other Keyword)

1-8 (8 Records)

Application of Alternative Light Source to Identify Painted Markings on a Model 1917 Renault French Tank (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Scott.

A very large battle damaged artifact, a M1917 French Renault tank, at the National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Missouri was subjected to analysis with an ALS (altenative light source) in order to identify and bring out faded painted markings. The ALS aided in identifying the tank as a vehicle assigned to the First French Tank Regiment. Work witht the ALS also helped more clearly identify the tank maintenance crew as Americans mechanic trainees who scratched their names on the inside of...


A Bridge of Ships: The Emergency Fleet Corporation and Texas' WWI Shipbuilding Legacy (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sam M Cuellar. Amy A Borgens.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "The Nuts and Bolts of Ships: The J. Richard Steffy Ship Reconstruction Laboratory and the future of the archaeology of Shipbuilding" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Despite 5,000 miles separation from the battlefields of Europe, Texas waters hide the legacy of at least 32 shipwrecks associated with WWI. To offset Allied merchant losses to German U-boats during the war, the United States Shipping Board...


Camp McCoy: The Archaeology of Enlisted Men Before the Great War, ca. 1905-1910 (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ryan J. Howell.

Test excavations conducted within modern-day Fort McCoy (US Army Installation, Wisconsin) revealed portions of historic Camp McCoy/Camp Emory Upton, two seasonal Army manuever camps occupied sporadically from 1905-1910.  Discovery of what appears to be a Company size bakery, butcher yard and supply station area, along with a period midden allows for a detailed archaeological understanding of the lives, equipment and diet of enlisted soldiers in the early "territorial" U.S Army. This site is...


Investigating the Royal Navy submarine HMS/M A7 lost in Whitsand Bay, Cornwall, in 1914; (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Allen Murray. Mallory Haas.

In 1914 A7 was on a training run and subsequently began her training dive, she was unable to surface again. Attempts were made to relocate her, but by that time all hands were lost, a total of 11 lives.  The Royal Navy was then unable to recover her, and she was abandoned.  Forgotten till sports divers relocated her in the 1970’s, then in 2001 A7 was designated a Controlled Site, under the Protection of Military Remains Act. Little was known of the wreck site due to a lack of monitoring of its...


Landscape of a Shootout: A Reexamination of the National Register Nomination for the Power Cabin (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Maxwell Forton.

This is a paper/report submission presented at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Rattlesnake Canyon in the Galiuro Mountains harbors a historic cabin at the center of one of Arizona’s most infamous shootouts. In 1918 four men were killed in a confrontation between local law enforcement and members of the Power family. The infamy surrounding this shootout and ensuing manhunt secured the site of the Power Cabin a place on the National Register of Historic Places....


Mallows Bay, The Ghost Fleet and Beyond (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Susan Langley.

The remains of nearly 100 WWl-era wooden steamships fill the waters of a half-mile wide embayment on the Potomac River and downstream singly and in clusters.  The maritime cultural landscape exhibits many other elements related to the original placement of the vessels in the bay, shipbreaking efforts during the Depression, and renewed scrapping endeavors during WWII.  In 2014, the State of Maryland created the Mallows Bay-Widewater Historical and Archaeological National Register District that...


Rediscovering USS San Diego: 100 Years from the U-boat Attack (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexis Catsambis. Art Trembanis.

In the fall of 2017, the Naval History and Heritage Command, the University Delaware, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock and partners conducted a cursory site assessment of the wreck of USS San Diego. Armored cruiser San Diego, launched in 1899, was the only major warship lost by the U.S. Navy during the Great War. Sunk by German U-boat in July 1918, the war grave came to rest just a few miles south of Long Island, where her story has continued to fascinate the public since that time. With...


WWI Concrete Shipwrecks in Texas (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dorothy Rowland.

During World War I, raw material supply shortages in the United States caused many manufacturing innovations to be made, including the use of concrete for the hulls of merchant ships. Concrete ships were manufactured by both the US government and private companies, but few were ready in time to contribute to the war effort. These ships were unique in their design, sailing capabilities, and working lifespan. There are four recorded archeological examples of concrete oil tankers in Texas, wrecked...