Quantitative and Spatial Analysis (Other Keyword)

1-25 (117 Records)

A 3D Geometric Morphometric Comparison of Bone Surface Modifications on Proboscidean Assemblages from the Western Great Lakes (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carolina Gonzalez. Jake Harris. Curtis Marean. Daniel Joyce. Erik Otárola-Castillo.

This is an abstract from the "Novel Statistical Techniques in Archaeology I (QUANTARCH I)" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Currently, an alarming number of plants and animals are on the brink of extinction due to habitat loss caused by human activities and climate change. Though numerically unprecedented, this may not be the first instance of a human-driven mass extinction. For decades, scholars have hypothesized that human predation led to the...


Abu Shusha: Integrating and Correlating Surface Features with Magnetic Susceptibility (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Seth Price.

This research looks at Tel Abu Shusha in the Jezreel Valley of Israel, an understudied site in a strategically important Levantine area with potential evidence of Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman settlements. Surface survey was completed in nine square kilometers around the Tel, resulting in ceramic density data as well as over 2,500 mapped surface features in GIS, such as quarries, wine presses, and architecture. Additionally, four magnetic susceptibility grids were taken in this area, each one...


Aerial Imaging Using UAVs (Drones) in Chihuahua and Nayarit, Mexico, to Map and Archive Archaeological Sites (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Searcy. Scott Ure. Michael Mathiowetz. Jaclyn Eckersley. Haylie Ferguson.

In 2017, we used UAVs (drones) to record eight archaeological sites from the air. As this type of technology becomes more refined, we have found that it is especially useful in carrying out three specific tasks: contour mapping, archiving site conditions, and identifying architecture. This paper reports our findings resulting from aerial images captured while flying archaeological sites in Nayarit and Chihuahua, Mexico.


Analyzing Similarity of Animal Style Art in Iron Age North Central Eurasia: A New Way to Study Continental Expression of Religious Symbolism (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kathryn MacFarland.

This is an abstract from the "Novel Statistical Techniques in Archaeology I (QUANTARCH I)" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Animal Style Art (ASA), an iconographic style expressed on monuments and material culture, is a geographically widespread phenomenon in north central Eurasia during the Iron Age (ca. 1,000 BCE – 100 CE). ASA analyses usually focus on stylistic difference or similarity. This poster reports an artifact-focused macro-scale...


Apotguan Revisited: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Latte Period Burials from Guam (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rona Ikehara-Quebral. Judith McNeill. Michele Toomay Douglas. Michael Pietrusewsky.

This is an abstract from the "Research and CRM Are Not Mutually Exclusive: J. Stephen Athens—Forty Years and Counting" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Cultural Resources Management studies in the Mariana Islands have consistently expanded opportunities for in-depth bioarchaeological research. Burial assemblages originating from historic preservation compliance obligations generally derive from one of three contexts: displaced fragmentary remains;...


Applicability of Maxent Predictive Modeling in Locating Pre-Hispanic Quarries in the Callejón de Huaylas, Peru (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melissa Litschi.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Stone in the Andes is an integral component of both the natural landscape and of the material expressions of cultural beliefs and practices. Growing evidence from multiple cultures indicates preferences for stone materials from certain sources, which held political, symbolic, and ideological importance. Determining quarry locations is a vital step in analyses...


An Approximation Towards the Function of Candeleros in the Plaza of the Columns Complex, Teotihuacan (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Yolanda Peláez Castellanos. Nawa Sugiyama. Agustín Ortíz.

Candeleros are ceramic artifacts that are almost exclusively found at Teotihuacan and appear in the archaeological record during the Late Tlamimilolpa, Xolalpan and Metepec phases. Their unconventional shape led scholars to propose different hypotheses regarding their specific function (i.e. "candle holders", incense burners, lighting devices, domestic ritual paraphernalia). This paper studies 368 candeleros (fragments and complete pieces) recovered from the 2015 and 2016 excavations carried out...


Archaeo-rover: A Low-Cost Robotic System for the Collection of Geophysical Data (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Austin Hill. Jesse Casana. Elise Jakoby Laugier.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Conventional methods for collection of ground penetrating radar (GPR), magnetic gradiometry, and other archaeo-geophysical data generally require precise grid layout ahead of surveys and significant labor to set up and move survey ropes, slowing data collection and creating a hurdle to larger, landscape-scale investigations. Although some commercial systems...


Archaeological Prospection Using Aerial Thermography and Quantitative Image Processing Methods (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel Levin. May Yuan. Michael Adler.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper explores new methods and developments in thermal remote sensing, aerial thermography, for archaeological research. These methods are applied in a pilot study at Picuris Pueblo, NM. Principles of thermal remote sensing that enable subsurface prospection are considered, along with previous investigations in this arena. Expanding upon existing...


Archaeology in 3D: Exploring Differences in Photogrammetric Models Created with Popular Structure-from-Motion (SfM) Archaeological Software from both Drone and Terrestrial Photography (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christine Jones. Elizabeth Church.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In this study, Structure-from-Motion(SfM) photogrammetric 3D models were created of mid- 19th century historic house ruins. Tyler house (Mound, TX) and Eyrie house (Holyoke, MA) have similar stone construction but dramatically different environmental contexts. The aim of this study was to compare point-cloud differences in, and the benefits and drawbacks of,...


Are Inka Khipu Knots Anything More than Numbers?: A Computational Investigation (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jon Clindaniel.

Inka khipus--the knot and cord recording devices of the Andes--have been said to have recorded everything from accounting, to histories and songs. Leland Locke demonstrated in the 1920s that Inka khipu knots often have standard numerical values. However, non-numerical Inka khipu signs remain elusive and undeciphered. Recent work by Gary Urton, however, has identified Inka khipus and individual khipu cords with knots that do not obey the standard numerical rules Locke identified. May Inka khipu...


Assessing Classic Maya Intermediate Elite Political Strategies through Multivariate Statistical Manipulation of Settlement Pattern Data (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Walden. Claire Ebert. Julie Hoggarth. Shane Montgomery. Jaime Awe.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Intermediate elites played pivotal roles in the politics of ancient complex societies across the world. In the Classic period (AD 250-900/1000) Maya lowlands, intermediate elites acted as intercessors between apical rulers and commoners. These intermediate elites and the political strategies they employed, however, have rarely taken center stage in...


Assessment of Late Quaternary Bison Diminution Using Linear Discriminant Analysis (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel Dalmas. Matthew G. Hill.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The proximate cause of reduction in the overall size of late Quaternary bison is the focus of continued debate. Some researchers contend that size reduction did not occur despite well-documented changes in climate and vegetation, while others link directional change in body size to changes in forage quality and availability or human predation. Historically,...


Aurignacian Projectile Points Do Not Represent a Proxy for the Initial Dispersal of Homo sapiens into Europe: Insights from Geometric Morphometrics (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Luc Doyon.

It has been argued that Aurignacian projectile points made of antler, bone, or ivory represent a proxy for the initial dispersal of Homo sapiens into Europe. Our research reassesses this claim by using geometric morphometric analysis to study 547 Aurignacian osseous implements recovered from 49 European sites. This approach allowed the identification of eight volumetric templates reproduced by Aurignacian artisans during the manufacture of split-based points. Two templates were identified for...


Beneath the Surface: A Ground-Penetrating Radar Study at the Mary Rinn Site (36IN29) (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessie Hoover.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Little is known about the Mary Rinn Site’s cultural affiliation. The site is surrounded by better defined cultural groups such as the Monongahela and the Fishbasket complex. Limited excavations and research revealed evidence of possible housing structures and the trace of a stockade line. Surface collected materials from the Boyer Collection, and field school...


Challenges and Prospects of Richness and Diversity Measures in Paleoethnobotany (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alan Farahani. Reuven Sinensky.

This is an abstract from the "Defining and Measuring Diversity in Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The measurement of the richness and diversity of archaeological plant remains recovered from sites is an essential, if not always explicitly recognized, aspect of paleoethnobotanical practice and interpretation. The range of different recovered plant taxa can be indicative of routes of taphonomic entry, diet breadth, local responses to...


Chincha Mercantilism: A Preliminary Investigation into Chincha Valley Economic Organization during the Late Intermediate Period and Late Horizon (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer Larios. Jacob Bongers. Jordan Dalton. Jo Osborn. Camille Weinberg.

This is an abstract from the "From the Paracas Culture to the Inca Empire: Recent Archaeological Research in the Chincha Valley, Peru" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Chincha Kingdom is widely recognized as one of the few cases in which 10,000 merchants are said to have existed in the Late Horizon non-market Inca economy. This paper seeks to investigate Chincha economic organization by analyzing the distribution of pottery from various sites in...


Chipping Away through Space and Time: A Macroevolutionary Approach to Household Spatial Organization (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ethan Ryan.

Archaeological investigations at Housepit 54 within the Bridge River site have exposed seventeen discreet floors primarily dating to ca. 1500-1000 cal. B.P. In this poster, we draw data from a subset of the site’s floors in order to address questions about the potential spatial and temporal relationships between the patterning of hearth-centered activity areas by primarily examining variability in lithic artifacts. Faunal remains and other features will also be included in analysis. Using the...


The Chronology of Goat-Springs Pueblo (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Evan Giomi.

The site of Goat Springs Pueblo, in Socorro County, NM, is unusual for a relatively low density of artifacts compared to a large investment in architecture at the site. Consequently, the development of a site chronology is necessary to establish whether the low density of artifacts is attributable to a short period of occupation (or series of short occupations) - despite the considerable investment in architecture - or if another explanation is necessary. Complicating the construction of a...


Climate Change, Economies of Scale, and Population Growth in Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Societies: A Case Study from Southwestern Wyoming (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erick Robinson. Jacob Freeman. David A. Byers. Spencer R. Pelton. Robert L. Kelly.

Increasing energy consumption returns, or economies of scale, have been illustrated similarly for modern urban societies and ancient complex societies. However, the relationship between underlying scaling relationships and the development and decline of population and social complexity over the long-term are yet to be investigated. This poster addresses their role in hunter-gatherer societies. Using formal mathematical models from macroeconomics, we examine the long-term variability of economies...


Comparing the Performance of Machine Learning and Traditional Approaches to Archaeological Site Modeling and Prediction (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ben Schiery. Paul Burnett. Lawrence C. Todd. Erik Otárola-Castillo. Benjamin Schiery.

This is an abstract from the "Novel Statistical Techniques in Archaeology II (QUANTARCH II)" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Site prediction models have helped archaeological resource management in site prospecting, impact mitigation, and information recovery. Beginning in 2009, we developed probability models for the Shoshone National Forest (SNF). These models helped to prioritize inventory of areas burned in wildfires, to rapidly appraise...


Contextual Taphonomy in Zooarchaeology: From Refuse Behavior to Site-Occupation Intensity in Levantine Epipaleolithic Camps (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Reuven Yeshurun.

In zooarchaeology, Contextual Taphonomy means the integration of the stratigraphic and contextual data with zooarchaeological and taphonomic data, to clarify the 'life history' of a faunal sub-assemblage in a given context. The approach uses animal remains to explain variability among site features by looking into the differential taphonomic histories of the bones, most importantly in the post-discard stage. Archaeofaunal remains are normally ubiquitous in foragers’ camps and their histories are...


Coverage-Based Rarefaction in Zooarchaeology: Potential and Pitfalls (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tyler Faith. Andrew Du.

This is an abstract from the "Defining and Measuring Diversity in Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Zooarchaeologists routinely measure the taxonomic richness of faunal assemblages in order to explore questions related to human subsistence behavior or paleoenvironmental change. A common solution to the well-known sampling issues that attend such analysis is rarefaction, whereby sample size is standardized by rarefying larger assemblages...


Dig Until You Find Blood: A Spatial Investigation of Menstrual Seclusion Practice at Deir el-Medina (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne Sherfield.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Ethnographic investigations into menstrual seclusion practices worldwide show that investigating these behaviors is not only fruitful, but also integral in understanding a community’s ideology and social structuring. Texts dating to the New Kingdom and Demotic periods suggest that ancient Egyptians engaged in a menstrual seclusion practice that included a...


Digital Deforestation: DTM Generation with Agisoft Photoscan (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Howland. Thomas Levy.

This is an abstract from the "Towards a Standardization of Photogrammetric Methods in Archaeology: A Conversation about 'Best Practices' in An Emerging Methodology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Applying digital photogrammetry to archaeological sites is a well-known approach. Also fairly common is photogrammetry’s combination with low-altitude aerial photography (LAAP) in order to generate three-dimensional data and produce GIS outputs such as...