Subsistence and Foodways: Domestication (Other Keyword)

1-25 (65 Records)

The Agricultural Lexicon of Western Indo-European: Crop Names (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Weiss.

This is an abstract from the "Wheels, Horses, Babies and Bathwaters: Celebrating the Impact of David W. Anthony on the Study of Prehistory" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The first speakers of Indo-European languages who entered Europe brought with them a fairly coherent agro-technological package. This is clear from the significant agreements that can be shown to exist in the lexicon describing the ard and its subparts among the Western...


An Agroecological Perspective on Crop Domestication in Western Asia (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Charles. Charlotte Diffey. Laura Green. Amy Bogaard.

This is an abstract from the "Questioning the Fundamentals of Plant and Animal Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Domestication has been discussed inter alia as a syndrome, a case study in niche construction and a reversible process. These perspectives frame new understandings of how management practice shaped domestication processes. For plants, recent experimental work has also been important for clarifying the effect of domestication...


Ancestral Pueblo Turkey Management on the Pajarito Plateau (C.E. 1150-1600) (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Cyler Conrad. Sandi Copeland.

This is an abstract from the "Current Research on Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) Domestication, Husbandry and Management in North America and Beyond" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In this paper we use bone apatite and collagen stable isotope analysis to examine long-term Ancestral Pueblo turkey management strategies on the Pajarito Plateau in the northern Rio Grande of New Mexico. Since previous preliminary research within this region identified...


Animal Resources Utilization and Management at the Late Neolithic Dinggong Site, China: Evidences from Stable Isotope Analysis (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Yifan Wang. Yu Dong. Fen Wang. Fengshi Luan.

This is an abstract from the "New Thoughts on Current Research in East Asian Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The long-term excavations at Dinggong, a late Neolithic site in northern China (c. 2600-2000 cal. BC), have uncovered extensive human and faunal remains with clear contextual information. We carried out stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of faunal remains to investigate the animal resources utilization and management of...


Archaeological Evidence of Multiple Domestication of Rice (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Yunfei Zheng. Haibin Gu.

The first domestication of rice in the Yangtze river valley in China is recently informed by genetic, archaeological, palaeoenvironmental, and archaeobotanical data. Archaeological sites where rice remains between 10000 and 4000 BP have been unearthed are concentrated in the middle and the lower Yangtze valley, a distance of over 1000 km apart. This study focuses on the morphological and histological features of spikelet bases of rice between 8300 and 4800 BP found in the Liyang Plain of the...


Archaeological Maize: Does It Vary across Space and Time? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Caitlin Clark. Linda Scott Cummings.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Recovery of maize cobs as part of the archaeological record yields a rich potential for discerning connections between people, places, and through time. Started almost three decades ago, the study of maize cob phytolith morphometrics has now produced a sufficient dataset for comparison of phytoliths from reference cobs spanning ancient varieties and more...


The Archaeology and Ancient Genomics of Early Horse Domestication: Not as Simple as Once Thought! (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alan Outram. Ludovic Orlando.

This is an abstract from the "Questioning the Fundamentals of Plant and Animal Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The earliest unambiguous evidence for equine husbandry relates to the Eneolithic Botai Culture of Northern Kazakhstan, circa. 5,500 years ago. However, whilst recent archaeological investigations and ancient genomics have added further weight to the case for domesticity and husbandry, it is now apparent that Botai horses are...


Bread, Apples, and Cereal Grains: Analyzing a Collection of Carbonized Food from Robenhausen, Switzerland (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann Eberwein.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper presents the results of research on a collection of food from Robenhausen, a lake-dwelling site southeast of Zurich. These specimens are part of a larger collection that was recovered in the late 19th century and is housed at the Milwaukee Public Museum. The material includes thirteen bread fragments, seventy-five apple pieces, and thousands of...


Captive Birds and Pet Keeping in Ancient Mesoamerica: The Case of Scarlet Macaws from Vista Hermosa (Tamaulipas, Mexico, 1300–1500 AD) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Aurelie Manin. Camilla Speller. Gregory Pereira. Christine Lefèvre.

In Mesoamerica, the tropical colourful birds were highly valued for their feathers. Among them, the scarlet macaw (Ara macao) provided bright red, blue and yellow feathers that were traded to the Central Mexican Highlands and, beyond Mesoamerica, until the American Southwest. As suggested by ethnohistoric records, some birds may have been maintained in captivity and harvested to supply the demand in feathers. In spite of examples of large-scale macaw management in the American Southwest, there...


Cause and Effect: Human-Animal Relationships and Zoonotic Brucellosis in Long Term Perspective (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robin Bendrey. Guillaume Fournié.

This is an abstract from the "HumAnE Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Zoonotic diseases remain a persistent global challenge, with some 60% of human pathogens of zoonotic origin. They disproportionately impact the world’s most vulnerable populations, particularly those living in close proximity with their animals and who have less access to health information and care. Archaeology’s cultural and biological datasets have the potential to...


Comparing Starch Granules from Wild and Cultivated Solanum jamesii to Determine the Effects of Domestication (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicole Herzog. Lisbeth Louderback. Bruce Pavlik.

The processes, antecedents, and outcomes associated with plant domestication have been central themes in archaeological and interdisciplinary research for the last century. While domesticates can often be readily distinguished from their wild progenitors both genetically and morphologically, the steps leading to domestication (transport, selective harvest, deliberate seed dispersal, active plant management, i.e. cultivation) can be difficult to track archaeologically. Techniques for identifying...


Context and Age of Early Maize (Zea mays) in the Central Plains (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary Adair.

This is an abstract from the "New and Ongoing Research on the North American Plains and Rocky Mountains" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Maize, or corn, was one of the dominate crops to many North American Plains tribes, contributing beyond subsistence to origin beliefs, rituals, ceremonies, and trade. Given this, archaeologists seek to recreate the evolutionary processes by which maize became an important element in the economy of Plains...


Divergence of Domestic Dog Morphology through Deep Time (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Keith Dobney. Ardern Hulme-Beaman. Carly Ameen. Allowen Evin. Thomas Cucchi.

The modern domestic dog is behaviourally and morphologically far removed from its ancient counterpart. Increasingly, research has demonstrated that using modern comparative collections for identifying domestic animals in archaeological contexts is problematic. This is likely the result of the intensive breeding that modern animals have undergone in at least the last two centuries. It is unclear how far back the current modern morphology of dogs goes, or how different ancient dogs were from their...


Diverse Genetic Resources Facilitated Chenopodium Domestication (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel Williams.

This is an abstract from the "Frontiers of Plant Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The prehistoric domesticate C. berlandieri var. jonesianum is well documented in the archaeobotanical record of eastern North America from ca. 3,800 BP to European contact when it fell out of use. The seed morphology of the domesticate resembles other new world Chenopodium domesticates (C. quinoa and C. berlandieri subsp. nuttalliae) and is distinct from...


Domesticating the Mosaic: Stable Isotope Approaches to Agroecologies in South Asia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ayushi Nayak. Michael Petraglia. Nicole Boivin. Patrick Roberts.

The origin of agriculture is a long-standing and pivotal point of archaeological research. The focus, however, has predominantly been on the earliest instances of crop domestication, whereas less is known about the nature of early farming. South Asia with its mosaic of environments and early farming strategies demonstrates the need for nuanced attention to aspects of early agro-ecologies such as manuring, water management strategies, and animal husbandry. Stable isotope analysis of botanical,...


Domestication and Management of Indigenous Plants in the U.S. Southwest: Case Studies of Little Barley (Hordeum pusillum Nutt.) and a Wild Potato (Solanum Jamesii) (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Adams. Anna Graham.

This is an abstract from the "Frontiers of Plant Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Although the histories of major New World plant domestications of beans, corn, squash, gourd, and tobacco are well-known, histories of regional plant domestications from local wild plants are not. In the pre-Hispanic U.S. Southwest, a wild late winter/early spring-ripening annual grass known as Little Barley (Hordeum pusillum Nutt.) became a crop of...


Domestication and the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Natalie Mueller.

This is an abstract from the "Frontiers of Plant Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In the past decade, a growing group of biologists, ecologists, and anthropologists have proposed a paradigm-shifting revision to the modern synthesis of evolutionary theory: the extended evolutionary synthesis (EES). The EES seeks to foreground developmental plasticity, epigenomics, and niche construction as evolutionary drivers. The EES is helping...


Domestication of the Cochineal (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren Clark. Meradeth Snow. Mark MacKenzie.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Identifying the specifics of location and time of the cultivation and domestication of the cochineal beetle (Dactylopius coccus) in the New World has eluded archaeologists and ecologists for decades. The cochineal’s production of red dye from its rich storage of carminic acid has made this insect a notable element in the lives of pre-contact Mesoamerican and...


Early Subsistence and Settlement in the Basin of Mexico: Preceramic and Pre-Urban Indicators (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily McClung De Tapia. Guillermo Acosta-Ochoa.

The race to stay ahead of modern human impact on preceramic and early ceramic sites in the Basin of Mexico is particularly dramatic. Recent investigations at sites located in three sectors of the Basin of Mexico, all of which are threatened to some degree, contribute to a broader understanding of the kinds of communities that anticipated increased complexity in social, economic and political spheres that ultimately developed into early urban centers such as Cuicuilco and Teotihuacan. ...


The Environmental and Cultural Context of North American Turkey Domestication (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin Thornton. Kitty Emery. Camilla Speller.

This is an abstract from the "Questioning the Fundamentals of Plant and Animal Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) is the only native vertebrate animal domesticated in North America. As such, the history, timing and process of its domestication is critical to our understanding of past human-animal relationships in the ancient Americas. This paper summarizes recent advancements in reconstructing the...


Evaluating Turkey Wellness and Treatment in the Maya World (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Randee Fladeboe. Kitty Emery. Erin Thornton. Lori Phillips.

This is an abstract from the "Current Research on Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) Domestication, Husbandry and Management in North America and Beyond" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. As the primary domesticated animal in prehistoric Mesoamerica, the turkey occupied a prominent and multivalent role in society, as a food source, a feather provider, and a subject of ritual sacrifice. The preponderance of turkey remains across the archaeological record of...


The Evolution of Domestication in Cassava Unraveled through Historical Genomics and Archaeobotany (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Logan Kistler. Fabio de Oliveira Freitas. Marcelo Simon. Robin Allaby.

This is an abstract from the "Frontiers of Plant Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Cassava (‘manioc' or ‘yuca' regionally) is a staple food for 800 million people worldwide. It was domesticated in the southwestern Amazon ~7,000 years ago, and archaeobotanical evidence suggests that it dispersed widely, including through Central America, shortly thereafter. In the present day, it is most widely grown in Brazil and throughout sub-Saharan...


An Examination of Circum-Alpine Lake Dwelling Botanicals at the Milwaukee Public Museum (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann Eberwein.

The lake dwelling sites of circum-Alpine Europe were discovered by the archaeological community in the mid-19th century and their artifacts were dispersed to museum collections in the United States and Europe. The Milwaukee Public Museum houses one such collection, which includes zoological material, textile fragments, tools, and carbonized botanicals and food. This paper focuses on the collection of plants and food, which come from Robenhausen, a lake-dwelling site south of Zurich. In studying...


Examining the Bread-Basket Model: Puuc Intra and Inter-Site Diversity in Plant Foods (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mario Zimmermann.

The Puuc mountains in the northwestern Maya lowlands have proven themselves to be double-faced in regard to pre-Columbian human settlement. On one side, the valleys exhibit the region's most fertile soils. On the other hand, rainfall is scarce and access to the underground water table is comparatively difficult. Nonetheless, authors such as Smyth (1991) have long suggested that the Puuc represented some of the bread-basket for the wider northwestern lowlands. As part of a broader study, in this...


Examining the Shift in Seed-Dispersal Mechanisms During Early Plant Domestication (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Spengler.

This is an abstract from the "Frontiers of Plant Domestication" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Scholarship is reframing the study of plant evolution under cultivation to focus on the effects of complex human harvesting practices (seed predation), increased human population size, and sedentism, while turning away from conscious human selection. Research has pointed out that parallelism in domestication is linked to seed-dispersal mechanisms, but...