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Race (Other Keyword)

1-25 (36 Records)

"Africa" in Connecticut (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433905] Sarah Croucher.

In this paper I discuss how archaeological interpretations of nineteenth century free black communities can be strengthened when Africa as a discursive concept is included alongside our analyses of race. In the southern U.S. historical archaeologists have long been attuned to the tangible material presence of enslaved Africans and their descendants. I address the question of "Africa" in relation to nineteenth century free communities of color in Connecticut, arguing that the discursive nature of...


Archeology and Race In the American Indian (1952)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 50066] Georg K. Neumann.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Black Toys, White Children: The Socialization of Children into Race and Racism, 1865-1940. (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434517] Christopher P. Barton.

Race and racism are learned. While there has existed a myriad of social practices that have been used to socialize individuals into ideologies of race, this paper details the use of material culture directed at children, that is automata, costumes, games and toys. This paper focuses on material culture from the 1860s-1940s depicting Africans/African Americans. These objects produced, advertised and purchased by adults from children’s play served three purposes; 1) to cultivate ideologies of race...


Caring Forthe Future With Archaeology (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435150] Christopher Matthews.

Historical archaeology is a useful method for discovering silenced and hidden pasts that force reconsideration of how the present came to be and at what and who’s expense. This impulse regularly generates deeper appreciations for the power of the past in and over the present. Yet, archaeologists less often move their results forward to engage with the futures that contemporary people, such as descendant and local communities, can make with new archaeological knowledge. This is surprising since a...


Communities in Conflict: Racialized Violence During Gradual Emancipation on Long Island (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434547] Meg Gorsline.

From New Amsterdam to Seneca Village, Diana diZerega Wall has examined the often-conflicting interactions of communities living in close relation.  In the early nineteenth century, the nearly 30-year process of Gradual Emancipation slowly dismantled the system of slavery in New York State, but it also created the conditions for the perpetuation of inequality among closely intertwined peoples: the black and white inhabitants of eastern Long Island. Inspired by Wall’s ability to uncover the...


The Embodiment of Identity: an Archaeological Perspective on Race and Self-Representation in18th -century Virginia (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435293] J. Hope Smith.

Institutionalized slavery helped to create the concept of race in the American mind and forced people into new social categories based on superficial bodily characteristics. These new social categories resulted in the formation of identities that were continuously negotiated, reinforced or challenged through daily bodily practices of self-presentation that included ways of dress, adornment and physical action. Because slavery was defined on the body, an embodiment approach to plantation...


Empowering Social Justice And Equality By Making Minority Sites And Intersecting Power Dynamics Visible (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435291] Suzanne Spencer-Wood.

Feminist critical intersectional theory emancipates constructions of the past from the symbolic violence of minority group exclusion perpetrated by historical narratives and archaeologies focused on the dominant social group of elite white men. Social justice and equality are empowered by historical markers, districts, heritage trails, statues, conferences, and K-college lesson plans that bring to light historic sites, experiences, and voices of minorities and women who were lost to history....


An Ethno-Atlas (1956)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 240908] Robert F. Spencer.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Everyone Was Black in the Mines: Exploring the Reasons for Relaxed Racial Tensions in Early West Virginia Coal Company Towns. (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433755] Robert DeMuth.

While racial inequality was frequently the norm in many early 20th century communities, several historians have noted that many central Appalachian coal mining ‘company towns’ tended toward more equitable white/black race relations.  The progressive nature of these histories is opposed to our modern stereotypes of the region, and may provide and important outlet for positive narratives of Appalachia.  This paper draws largely on oral histories and documentary evidence to understand the processes...


From Field to Faubourg: Race, Labor, and Craft Economies in Nineteenth-Century Creole New Orleans (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435139] Christopher M. Grant.

The effects of the Haitian Revolution on the city of New Orleans have been the subject of historical inquiry for several decades. Scholars have detailed the political and cultural transformations that were set into motion when some 10,000 refugees arrived in the port city from the Saint-Domingue. While it is acknowledged that they contributed heavily to everyday practices in New Orleans, the extent to which the refugees - and free people of color in particular - actively sought to preserve the...


Geographically and Socially on the Periphery: People of Color and their Role in Social Life in Nantucket, Massachusetts (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434142] Hannah C Desmarais.

The Boston-Higginbotham House, located on the island of Nantucket, Massachusetts, was constructed by Seneca Boston, an African-American former slave, and his native Wampanoag wife Thankful Micah in the 18th century.  The couple's descendants continued to own and inhabit the home for more than a century until it passed to the Boston Museum of African American History.  Archaeological excavations conducted by the University of Massachusetts Boston at the home in 2008 shed light on the ways...


Human Variation: An Introduction to Physical Anthropology (1969)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 255883] James F. Downs. Hermann K. Bleibtreu.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


"…in a few years by death and removes they were all gone…": Forced Relocation as Racial Violence (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434321] Mark S. Tweedie. Allison J.M. McGovern.

Indigenous dispossession and forced relocation remain central features of historical narratives, as they are used to explain the seemingly "natural" cultural loss and subsequent disappearance of Native peoples. However, these occurrences are less frequently remembered as acts of violence that supported privilege and cultural hegemony. In this paper, documentary and archaeological evidence are used to highlight instances of indigenous removals on eastern Long Island in the post-contact era, and...


Indian Villages in Pennsylvania

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 118496] Anonymous.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Intersecting Histories: The Beman Triangle and Wesleyan University (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428246] Sarah Croucher.

This paper discusses preliminary archaeological investigation of the Beman Triangle, CT. From the mid- to late-19th century, the Beman Triangle was a community of property owning African Americans, closely allied with one of the first AME Zion Churches in the US. As a community archaeology project, partnering between the AME Zion Church and Wesleyan University, the archaeological investigations of the site have been driven by multiple intersections. Questions from the working group have...


An Intersectional Study of Authorship and Citation in American Antiquity, Latin American Antiquity, and Advances in Archaeological Practice (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 431958] Laura Heath-Stout.

Over the last thirty years, archaeologists studying identity in the past have also examined archaeologists in the present. Feminist archaeologists of the 1990s examined gender inequities among archaeologists using a wide variety of metrics. Since NAGPRA passed in 1991, many have written about the roles of Native Americans and other people of color in archaeological research. Yet there are no studies of how sexism, racism, and heterosexism work together in our field. I will examine patterns of...


Intersectionality and Health Consumerism in Antebellum Virginia (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 431956] Lori Lee.

This presentation explores intersectionality in the context of health consumerism in antebellum central Virginia. Health consumerism incorporates the modern sense of patients’ involvement in their own health care decisions and the degree of access enslaved African Americans had to resources that shaped their health and well-being experiences. To emphasize the multilayered nature of health and illness, this analysis engages Margaret Lock and Nancy Scheper-Hughes "three bodies model." The three...


An Introduction to Anthropology (1953)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 219562] Ralph L. Beals. Harry Hoijer.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Landscapes of Desire: Mapping the Brothels of 1880s Washington, DC (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434956] Jennifer A. Porter-Lupu.

From 1860-1915, brothels were prominantly loaced within Washington, DC’s urban landscape. This paper focuses on brothels in 1880s Washington, examining the spatial dynamics of the main brothel neighborhood, the Hooker’s Division. I argue that experiences of Hooker’s Division brothels were shaped by the space within the city that the neighborhood occupied, and simultaneously, Washington’s sex workers contested social norms thereby changing the symbolic implications and tangible reality of the...


The Living Races of Man (1965)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 256373] Carleton S. Coon. Edward E. Hunt, Jr..

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Mankind So Far (1944)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 277686] William Howells.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Melvina Massey: Fargo's Most Famous Madam (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434962] Angela J. Smith.

In my work as a professor and public historian, research material often unfolds from teaching. In my Spring 2013 Introduction to Museum Studies class at North Dakota State University, students conducting primary source research on early Fargo discovered a will and probate records for Melvina Massey. The records show that she was an African American and ran a brothel in Fargo for more than 20 years. The course concluded with an exhibit, "Taboo: Fargo-Moorhead, An Unmentioned History," and one of...


Nineteenth Century Race, Gender, and Consumerism in Virginia (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 405384] Lori Lee.

This paper uses historical and archaeological evidence to which consumer goods were available to enslaved men and women in nineteenth century Virginia. At the scale of local markets and stores, supply and variable adherence to laws constrained which goods were available to slaves who were able to purchase or trade for them. By comparing purchases of enslaved African Americans with purchases of whites at the same store, I assess which goods were accessible to each group. I use archaeological data...


No Longer "Playin’ the Lady": Examining Black Women’s Consumption at the Ransom and Sarah Williams Farmstead (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435290] Nedra K. Lee.

Archaeological studies of race and consumption have linked black consumer behavior to the negotiation of social and economic exclusion.  While these studies have highlighted blacks’ efforts to define themselves after slavery, they have overlooked black women and how they used consumer goods to aspire towards gendered notions of racial uplift and respectability.  This paper examines the Ransom and Sarah Williams Farmstead, a historic freedman’s site in Travis County, Texas, to describe the nature...


Overcoming the Silence: Uncomfortable Racial History, Dissonant Heritage, and Public Archaeology at Virginia’s Contested Sites (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434913] Rebecca Schumann.

This paper explores the use public historical archaeology at contested sites as means of, and discussing uncomfortable racial histories with multiple communities. Virginian’s colonial and Early Republic heritage struggle with giving a voice to non-Euro-Americans, acknowledge racial inequality, and attracting tourists. This struggle often results in silences that perpetuate structural inequalities from the past in the present. Drawing from my own research and experiences in Virginia, I argue that...

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America