Dogs (Other Keyword)

1-25 (28 Records)

Ancient Dogs of the Tennessee River Valley (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Meagan Dennison.

Skeletal remains of domestic dogs, particularly dog burials, are common from prehistoric archaeological sites in the Southeastern United States. Efforts to describe these ancient canines have traditionally focused on body size and cranial morphology, however, more recently paleopathology has played a key role in understanding ancient canine lifeways and the interactions between humans and domestic dogs. Mortuary analysis can also bolster interpretations of life histories and dogs’ roles within...


Beyond bones: Non-faunal evidence for the role of dogs in Anglo-Saxon society (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Pam Crabtree.

Zooarchaeological data have provided much new information on Anglo-Saxon dogs including information on animal sizes, ages at death, paleopathology, and evidence for the treatment/mistreatment of dogs. However, many aspects of the relationship between humans and dogs in the Anglo-Saxon period cannot be understood on the basis of animal bones alone. This paper will explore the non-archaeozoological evidence for human-dog relationships in the Anglo-Saxon period drawing on evidence from literature...


The Bridge River Dogs: A Comprehensive interpretation of aDNA and stable isotopes analysis obtained from dog remains (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emilia Tifental. Anna Marie Prentiss. Meradeth Snow.

Excavations at the Bridge River site have been on-going since 2003, increasing our understanding of the communities that inhabited the Middle Fraser Canyon, British Columbia, over 1,000 years ago. The most recent excavation at Housepit 54 in the summer of 2014 supplied further data regarding relationships between people and their dogs. Dogs are well documented in the Middle Fraser Canyon through both archaeological excavations and traditional knowledge. A household's possession of a dog has been...


The Canids of Arroyo Hondo: a reanalysis (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Victoria Bowler. Emily Jones. Cyler Conrad.

Domestic dogs were an important part of human cultures in the prehistoric American Southwest; the significance of these animals is apparent from ceramic decorations and clay figurines, as well as faunal remains. But how these animals functioned within Southwestern cultures is less well-understood. Prehistoric dogs’ roles in some cases seem to have been similar to those of modern dogs: protector, worker, and pet. However, zooarchaeological data have shown that dogs, like turkeys, were also used...


Cats and Dogs in Late 18th Century Philadelphia Society (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Marie Pipes.

This is an abstract from the "Zooarchaeology, Faunal, and Foodways Studies" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Cats and dogs have lived with humans for thousands of years. Our relationship with both species evolved and changed over time as their social importance in Euromerican culture shifted from being working animals to status symbols, especially during the 18th century. Unlike other domesticated species, their remains tend to be poorly...


Chien Opératoire: Dogs as Technological Systems in the Northern Great Plains (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kacy Hollenback. Abigail Fisher.

In the past, like today, dogs (Canis familiaris) were not only human companions, they were also tools, beasts of burden, alarm systems, sources of food, and ritual elements. Since first domesticated, humans have shaped dogs physically and behaviorally, and they have, in turn, shaped our societies. As such, domesticated canines can be treated as a form of technology, regardless of their own forms of agency. By technology we refer to objects (i.e., dogs and linked artifacts), related practices,...


Connecticut Indian Burials (1963)
DOCUMENT Citation Only C. C. Coffin.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Crab Orchard Site, Tazewell County, Virginia (1980)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Howard A. MacCord, Sr.. William T. Buchanan, Jr..

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Do dingoes hold the key to understanding human behavioural change in ancient Australia? (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melanie Fillios.

Archaeological evidence suggests dingos were brought to Australia sometime during the mid-Holocene (c. 5,000-3,500 years ago). Their introduction coincides with significant changes in human behaviour, specifically in technology, settlement patterns and diet. While their relationship with Aboriginal people is commonly held to have been commensal, this interesting amalgamation of changes certainly begs the question of whether there may be a dingo ‘signature’ in the archaeological record....


Dog 6: The Life and Death of A Good Boy in Eighteenth-Century Virginia (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dessa E. Lightfoot.

This is an abstract from the "Burial, Space, and Memory of Unusual Death" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Colonial Williamsburg archaeologists encountered a series of dog burials during an excavation of the eighteenth-century Public Armoury site in Colonial Williamsburg. Among these already uncommon eighteenth-century burials, one dog in particular stood out: Dog 6, an elderly male with evidence of multiple healed injuries, unusual skeletal...


Dogs as Weapon Technology: Their Role in Prehistoric Hunting Groups (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Angela Perri.

Dogs have played a variety of roles in ancient and modern groups, including hunting companions. This role is often suggested as an impetus for domestication or one of the dog’s earliest functions. Though advantageous in some cases, the hunting dog’s effectiveness (or inefficiency) is linked to external factors, such as environment, prey species, and hunting method. Under optimal conditions, dogs can act as the primary tool in capturing prey, often proving critical to hunting success. In other...


Domesticated Animals as a Source of Cultural Change during the Contact Period on the Northwestern Plains (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brandi Bethke.

Despite functioning as pack animals, guards, religious figures, and even companions, dogs were never as integral to Blackfoot culture as the horse became. To date, researchers have most often characterized the relationship of Blackfoot people and their horses by framing the horse as an "upgraded model"—a "new and improved" dog. While prior experience with domesticated dogs did facilitate the incorporation of horses into the daily lives of Blackfoot people, this paper argues that the fundamental...


The earliest domesticated dogs in the Midcontinent: Chronology, Morphology, and Paleopathology (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chris Widga. Dennis Lawler.

The Midwest has the earliest and possibly richest record of dog burials in North America. New direct AMS 14C dates on Archaic-period canids from the region confirms this pattern (Koster Horizon XI, 10,130-9680 cal BP; Stilwell II, 10,200-9630 cal BP; Rodgers Shelter, 9000-8600 cal BP; Rodgers Shelter 8560-8210 cal BP). We use 2D and 3D geometric morphometrics to assess variability in the morphology of wild and domesticated Canidae from midwestern Archaic assemblages (10,000-6000 cal BP). Health...


Examining the Dietary Ecology of Ancient Channel Island Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and Island Foxes (Urocyon littoralis) Through Compound Specific Isotope Analysis of 13C and 15N from Bone Collagen (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea Smith. Chris Yarnes.

Advancements in gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) have allowed researchers to examine isotopic compositions for individual amino acids (AAs) comprising protein-based tissues. This method, known as Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA), has the potential to overcome certain limitations associated with bulk tissue (e.g., bone collagen) isotopic analysis. Specifically, CSIA allows information about organismal ecology to be generated from discrete samples...


Food or Fur: Dog Butchery on Kodiak Island, Alaska (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Melyssa Huston. Christine Mikeska. Catherine F. West.

Archaeological evidence suggests that domesticated dogs (Canis familiaris) have been in the Kodiak Archipelago of Alaska for at least 7000 years. Despite their lengthy presence, little is known about their relationship with Kodiak’s human inhabitants. Based on both western assumption and the limited ethnohistoric record for this region, it is commonly assumed that people simply kept dogs as pets. However, previous studies of dog remains from the Uyak site on Kodiak Island note the presence of...


Friends in High Places. An Integrated Examination of the Long-Term Relationship between Humans and Dogs in Arctic Prehistory (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carly Ameen. Anna Linderholm. Ellen McManus-Fry. Kate Britton. Keith Dobney.

Dogs are arguably the most significant domestic species in the circumpolar North, in both their universal importance to life-ways and their near-uniqueness as a regional domesticate. The Arctic was the gateway for at least 4 independent waves of migration of dogs into the Americas, beginning as early as ~17,500-13,000 years ago, making this region particularly important for investigating not only the cultural and technological functions of Arctic dogs, but also the impact of successive...


Happy Hollow Rock Shelter (1967)
DOCUMENT Citation Only L. C. Steege.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Happy Hollow Rock Shelter (1967)
DOCUMENT Citation Only L. C. Steege.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Hard Fare: Investigating Dog Teeth to Interpret the Value of a Dog among Northwestern Plains and Rocky Mountains (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amanda Burtt.

In this paper, Dental Microwear Texture Analysis is used to evaluate the teeth of dogs recovered from Late Prehistoric sites to investigate the idea that these animals had their natural diets modified by their human counterparts. This study compares microwear from wolves (Canis lupus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) to that of archaeological dogs recovered from various sites that represent human mobile groups of the Northwestern Plains and Rocky Mountains. Varied practices have been described in the...


Identifying Canid Tooth Modification: A Side-by-side Comparison of 3D Imaging Techniques (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amanda Burtt. Alex Badillo. Lindsey Kitchell. Gary Motz.

In this paper, we evaluate the efficacy of two methods, namely photogrammetry and 3-D laser scanning, for the purpose of identifying cultural modification of bone, specifically canid teeth. Instances of dogs with altered canine and carnassial teeth have been observed in Plains Native American archaeological assemblages as well as in the ethnographic record of the Late Prehistoric era. The identification of this type of cultural modification will help interpret ways in which animal and human...


Living with People can be Bad for your Health: Tooth Loss and Trauma in Northern Wolves and Dogs (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Losey.

Humans and dogs have long engaged in complex relationships, ranging from loving and intimate, to extremely violent and exploitive. Archaeology has tended to focus on the former, mostly ignoring the sometimes-ample evidence for trauma and tooth loss in remains of ancient dogs. Inferring the causes of such lesions on ancient dog remains has proven difficult, in part because of the lack of comparative data for canids living outside of the human niche. This paper compares patterns of cranial trauma...


An osteometric analysis of some aboriginal dogs (1948)
DOCUMENT Citation Only William George Haag.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


An osteometric analysis of some aboriginal dogs (1948)
DOCUMENT Citation Only William George Haag.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Raising Dogs for Meat and Sacrifice: A Comparative Study of Classic Period Sites in Oaxaca, Mexico (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather Lapham. Gary M. Feinman. Linda M. Nicholas.

The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) became a staple in the meat diet of Zapotec peoples during the Formative period (1500 BC – AD 200) in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, and continued to be increasingly important in subsistence and ritual into the Classic and Postclassic periods. Recent zooarchaeological research has identified low-intensity household management/production of animals and animal by-products at sites throughout the valley, with each settlement marked by its own unique signature of...


Shippe Canyon Site (1973)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dennis C. Joyes.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.