Archaeological Ethics (Other Keyword)

1-7 (7 Records)

Archaeological Ethics (1996)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen D. Vitelli.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Archaeology and the Interested Layman or What You Always Wanted to Know About Archaeology but Didn't Know Where to Ask (1972)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hester A. Davis.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


DINAA Means "Everybody Can Be a Digital Curator": Community-Powered Disciplinary Curational Behaviors with the Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA) (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Joshua Wells. Eric Kansa. Sarah Kansa. David Anderson. Stephen Yerka.

This is a pdf copy of the PPT slides used for this presentation at the SAA symposium. The Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA) has a massive compilation of archaeological site data. This paper presents recent findings from development of DINAA’s site database, efforts to link DINAA with mined references from digital literature, and efforts to prepare DINAA for future crowd-sourced professional data citations. The continental United States spans eight million square kilometers,...


Ethics in American Archaeology (2002)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark J. Lynott. Alison Wylie.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Ethics in American Archaeology: Challenges for the 1990s (1995)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark J. Lynott. Alison Wylie.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Lessons from the Classroom: A Teacher’s Suggestions for Improving K-12 Archaeology Outreach (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Theresa McReynolds Shebalin.

Archaeologists committed to public outreach are typically motivated by the hope that helping individuals appreciate how archaeology contributes to understanding the past will in turn encourage citizen stewardship of the archaeological record. Archaeologists working with children in particular have the best chance of making an impact in this area since their audiences can in turn act upon and help spread messages of site preservation and other matters of archaeological ethics for many years to...


Unethical Pasts, Uncertain Presents, and Potential Futures: The Evolution of Archaeological Representation in Video Games (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only L. Meghan Dennis.

Since the late 1970s, archaeology and archaeologists have appeared within games presented on every major video game and console format. From the earliest depictions as treasure hunters within games such as the Atari 2600’s temple crawler, Quest for Quintana Roo, to more nuanced portrayals within PC gaming’s recent field school simulator, C14 Dating, changes to how the public privileges and disregards the reality of archaeological practice can be traced through how the discipline is represented...