Mortuary Ritual (Other Keyword)

1-7 (7 Records)

Fristoe Burial Complex of Southwestern Missouri (1967)
DOCUMENT Citation Only W. Raymond Wood.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Mingled Bones, Mingled Bodies: Primary and Commingled Burials at Nabataean Petra, Jordan (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Megan Perry. Anna Osterholtz.

Although bioarchaeologists have recently developed best practices for the analysis of commingled samples, few scholars have theorized the significance of communal, commingled burial. In many cases, the practice of commingling skeletal remains is but one possible variant in the mortuary process. Numerous societies, including the Nabataeans at Petra, utilize collective burial in addition to primary inhumation within the overall mortuary program. The actual practice of commingling, such as when and...


Overby's Headless Burial (24SH615) (1984)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dennis C. Joyes. Peggy McCallum. Tom Jerde.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Pots with Purpose: Examining Mortuary Craft Specialization on the Late Woodland Gulf Coast (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only C. Trevor Duke. Neill J. Wallis. Ann S. Cordell.

This is an abstract from the "Cross-Cultural Petrographic Studies of Ceramic Traditions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Extant models of craft specialization often assume that craft production served to instantiate or reify existing social relationships. By this line of reasoning, pots must have played only a passive role at communal gatherings and mortuary rituals. If pots were merely the accoutrements of specialists, the symbols of lineages, or...


Shifting Practices: Materiality and Mortuary Ritual at Early Classic Charco Redondo (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle Butler.

This paper explores the relationships between the people, objects and practices that created an Early Classic communal mortuary space at the site of Charco Redondo in the lower Río Verde Valley of Oaxaca. The Early Classic follows the collapse of the first Rio Viejo polity, and significant differences in mortuary practices may signify a transformation in how power and authority were constituted. While communal internment continued, burials were generally undisturbed by later internments and...


The Treatment of the Dead in the Mid-Chincha Valley, Peru (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jacob Bongers. Brittany Jackson. Terrah Jones. Susanna Seidensticker. Charles Stanish.

This paper investigates post-mortem human body manipulation associated with above-ground and semi-subterranean tombs known as chullpas, which date from the Late Intermediate Period (A.D. 1000-1476) to the Late Horizon (A.D. 1400-1532) in the mid-Chincha Valley, Peru. Mortuary rituals are cross-cultural social processes that comprise a range of practices. One such practice is the treatment of deceased bodies which varies across time, space, and social organization. A 2013 survey of the...


Where's your Mummy? The Business of Mummification in Late and Roman Period Egypt (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica Kaiser.

It is often said that the practice of mummification became a veritable business during the Late and Roman periods, when it was extended to include not only the elite, but also those on the lower end of the status scale. The increase in the number of bodies being embalmed led to the widespread adoption of more expeditious techniques, sometimes resulting in mummies that, though outwardly pleasing in appearance, concealed nothing but a jumbled mess of bones beneath their wrappings. The non-elite...