Forensic (Other Keyword)

1-11 (11 Records)

Forensic Archaeological Field Training: Pedagogy and Practice (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Cheryl Johnston. Paul Martin. John Schweikart. Lucas Rolleri. Jane Brown.

In the discipline of archaeology the field school experience is considered the fundamental training that all archaeologists will experience along their educational pathway. These trainings are designed to teach the basic methods and critical thinking skills that are needed to conduct archaeological investigations. Within the realm of forensic anthropology and forensic archaeology an additional set of field school experiences have been developed to address the recovery of human remains and...


Forensic Archaeology: a ten year retrospective (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kimberlee Moran.

In 2004 the first symposium dedicated to forensic archaeology was organized at the Society for American Archaeology’s annual meeting. At that time, forensic archaeology was struggling to be defined within the archaeological community and was mostly non-existent to forensic practitioners in the USA. The events of 9/11, several domestic high profile mass casualty events, missing persons and some homicide investigations began a gradual momentum towards the recognition of archaeology’s use within...


Forensic Techniques to Investigate Museum and Archaeological Samples (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shanan S. Tobe. Courtney Mower. Anna Dhody. Carolyn Rando. Kimberlee S. Moran.

Forensic biologists utilize the latest DNA technologies to deal with low level, difficult, and degraded samples on a regular basis. In fact, forensic testing is specifically designed and validated to be robust under conditions that would cause most other genetic testing to fail. It is therefore no surprise that forensic genetic techniques can assist museums with research questions regarding their collections. Here we discuss how, using forensic techniques and testing, we were able to analyze...


Further Defining the Role of the Forensic Archaeologist (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eric E. Young.

As the use of archaeologists in forensic matters grows, it is important to define the role the archaeologist ought to play in such situations. Archaeologists should educate law enforcement personnel as to their utility in investigations. It is important that archaeologists understand their usefulness in criminal matters, and even more importantly, archaeologists should understand their limitations in investigations. There is a need to establish guidelines as to what archaeologists should/should...


Human Identification: Case Studies In Forensic Anthropology (1984)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ted A. Rathbun. Jane E. Buikstra.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Human Skeleton in Forensic Medicine (1962)
DOCUMENT Citation Only W. M. Krogman.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


An Overview of Forensic Trophy Skull Analysis in Montana (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katherine Baca.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Retaining a skeletal element, especially a skull, whether it be for ancestor veneration, social memory, or as a trophy, is a common practice throughout human history. Keeping a cranium can reflect a lot of information about cultural beliefs concerning death, war, and victory at specific points in time. It is more common than one might think to come across...


Put ‘em to Work! The Transition from the Classroom to the Field. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dana Kollmann.

Many students eager to begin a career in the forensic sciences have never been on a crime scene and it is even more unlikely that they have ever had the opportunity to process one. This paper details the unusual circumstances that enabled Towson University students to partner with law enforcement and work on both active and cold cases that have necessitated the search for human remains and associated evidence. SAA 2015 abstracts made available in tDAR courtesy of the Society for American...


Searching for Standards: Federal Efforts Regarding Crime Scene Investigation with Input from Archaeology (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kimberlee S. Moran.

In 2009 the National Research Council released a damning report on the state of forensic science in the United States. The end result has been a six year mission to develop national standards and best practice for the myriad of forensic specialties. Coordinated by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), scientific working groups (SWGs) brought together practitioners, academics, and other stakeholders from around the country to draft documents outlining standard terminology...


The Value of Forensic Archaeology Training for All Law Enforcement Officers: A Case Example (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Martin McAllister. Brent Kober.

Law enforcement officers working for agencies not directly involved in land management, such as county sheriff’s departments, traditionally have not been trained to recognize evidence of crimes related to resource protection, for example, artifacts and human remains stolen in the commission of archaeological crimes. In a recent class presented by our firm and cohosted by the Lake County, California Sheriff’s Department and two California tribes, sheriff’s deputies and evidence technicians...


Who Holds Your Light? Revealing relationships through a forensic approach to Upper Paleolithic cave art (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Leslie Van Gelder.

The study of finger flutings, lines drawn with fingers in the soft surfaces of cave walls and ceilings, allows for the identification of unique individuals within a cave’s context. In early years of research we were able to identify men, women, and children in some of the 15 caves which have been studied. These led to discoveries as to which individuals which were often found together in their movement through the caves. The intimacy of cave spaces with artists working side by side, sometimes in...