Ironclad (Other Keyword)

1-9 (9 Records)

CSS Georgia And Research That Preceded Mitigation (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gordon Watts. Martin Dean.

The Savannah District USACE and the Georgia Ports Authority are partnering to deepen and widen various portions of the Savannah River. As part of the associated permitting process, numerous archaeological investigations have been carried out by the District. A series of investigations of the remains of the ironclad CSS Georgia began following dredge impacts to the wreck in 1968. The following year Navy divers carried out an initial assessment of the wreck and in 1979 archaeologists from Texas...


CSS Huntsville and CSS Tuscaloosa Project, Mobile River, Alabama (1985)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Allen R. Saltus. Sidney H. Schell.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Data Recovery of the CSS Georgia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephen James.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, in partnership with the Georgia Ports Authority, is proposing to expand the Savannah Harbor navigation channel on the Savannah River.  As designed, the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP) will consist of deepening and widening various portions of the harbor. Previous surveys identified the remains of the CSS Georgia, a Civil War ironclad within the Area of Potential Effect, and as proposed, the SHEP would adversely affect this National...


GIS and the CSS Georgia Recovery Project (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only William J. Wilson.

Visualizing the distribution of artifacts at the CSS Georgia site was a challenge due to the vast amount of material recorded and recovered. To assist in this, a GIS was created which incorporated data gathered from diver reconnaissance and recovery operations. First, unit sketches and notes were scanned and georectified. Later, artifacts positioned from the sketches and ultra-short baseline (USBL) readings were digitized and organized according to type. This allowed the archaeologists to...


The Pewter Assemblage from the Site of CSS Georgia (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Martindale.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Current Research at the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. CSS Georgia had been in service for nearly 20 months when Sherman’s March to the Sea prompted Confederate forces to scuttle the ironclad to prevent the ship’s capture. Given the Confederate forces had time to remove supplies from the ship, salvage efforts shortly following the American Civil...


Preliminary Results Of The Data Recovery Project of the CSS Georgia (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephen James. Gordon Watts.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, in partnership with the Georgia Ports Authority, is proposing to expand the Savannah Harbor navigation channel on the Savannah River.  As designed, the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP) will consist of deepening and widening various portions of the harbor. Previous surveys identified the remains of the CSS Georgia, a Civil War ironclad-ram within the Area of Potential Effect, and as proposed, the SHEP would adversely affect this...


Remote Sensing Investigations of Civil War Era Shipwrecks in the Vicinity of Fort St. Philip, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jack B. Irion. David V. Beard. Paul V. Heinrich.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


"Up Pops The Monitor": The Battle Of Hampton Roads In Popular Culture (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna G Holloway.

On March 9, 1862 in the placid waters of Hampton Roads in Virginia, the Union steam-battery Monitor met the Confederate ram Virginia (née Merrimack) in battle. Though this first clash of ironclads was technically a draw, it helped to usher in a new era in naval warfare. It also ushered in over 150 years of popular music, poetry, artwork, alcohol, clothing, sports teams, farm equipment, and home appliances inspired by the meeting of these two vessels. Interest in the Monitor in the 20th and 21st...


Why we conserve artifacts, the CSS Georgia Story. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jim Jobling.

As part of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, the USACE, Savannah District, tasked Panamerican Consultants with archaeologically recording and systematically recovering the artifacts from the wreck of the CSS Georgia.  More than 125 tons of material was recovered, which created a few interesting challenges for the field crew and the Conservation Research Lab.  What artifacts does one conserve, and what do we document and rebury.  This paper presents a number of ways that a well-equipped...