Dna (Other Keyword)

1-8 (8 Records)

American Indian DNAs Have Rare Asian Mutations. Draft for Review For Publication in American Journal of Human Genetics (1987)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Theodore Schurr. Scott W. Ballinger. Yik-Yuen Gan. Judith A. Hodge. D. Andrew Merriwether. Dale N. Lawrence. William C. Knowler.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Body in the Bog but No DNA (1986)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret H. Hughes. David S. Jones. Robert C. Connolly.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


DNA Identification of Prehistoric Puebloan Quids (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Terence Murphy. Karen R. Adams. Keith L Johnson.

Quids are small wads of fiber that were chewed or sucked by prehistoric Native Americans and then spit out. To identify the plants used for making a selection of quids from Antelope Cave, we extracted DNA from 10 quids, used polymerase chain reaction to amplify a 250-base section near the chloroplast trnL gene, and determined the sequence of the amplified fragment. DNAs from the 10 quids had identical base sequences, and these matched corresponding sequences from authentic samples of Yucca ...


Eight years of partnership with Coast Tsimshian First Nations on genomic research (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ripan Malhi. Jerome Cybulski. John Lindo. Michael DeGiorgio. Joycelynn Mitchell.

In 2008 a partnership was established with the Coast Tsimshian to use genomics as a novel avenue of research to learn about the population and evolutionary history of these First Nations. Community based research methods were used as a way to establish research goals that were respectful and mutually beneficial to all parties. Through this partnership we have been able to gain insight into the present-day and ancestral Coast Tsimshian genetic structure. Specifically, we have demonstrated a close...


Forensic Techniques to Investigate Museum and Archaeological Samples (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shanan S. Tobe. Courtney Mower. Anna Dhody. Carolyn Rando. Kimberlee S. Moran.

Forensic biologists utilize the latest DNA technologies to deal with low level, difficult, and degraded samples on a regular basis. In fact, forensic testing is specifically designed and validated to be robust under conditions that would cause most other genetic testing to fail. It is therefore no surprise that forensic genetic techniques can assist museums with research questions regarding their collections. Here we discuss how, using forensic techniques and testing, we were able to analyze...


Integrating archaeological and genetic data (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only K. Ann Horsburgh.

Over the span of his career, Jim O’Connell has shown us by example how advances in genetics can help us better model prehistory when considered alongside archaeological evidence. In this paper I reflect on his career to highlight the way in which science currently considers genetic and archaeological evidence together to (1) create or refine culture historical models of population movement and demography, and (2) to develop insight in to the relationship between hunter-gatherers and their food...


Lives Wrought in the Furnace: New Research on the Labor Force at Catoctin Furnace (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth A. Comer.

Starting in 1776, Catoctin Furnace was a thriving iron-making community at the base of the Catoctin Mountains in northern Frederick County, Maryland. Enslaved blacks and European immigrants comprised the labor force. The growth of large iron-making corporations ultimately doomed this rural industrial complex, and it ceased operation in 1903. We know much about the owners of the complex. However, the story of the laborers is only beginning to emerge. Several archaeological reports and a recent...


Lost Legacy: The Search for a Descendant Community (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth A. Comer.

Catoctin Furnace is a community at the base of the Catoctin Mountains in Frederick County, Maryland, that descends from a thriving iron-working village. From the furnace’s foundation in 1776, European immigrants and enslaved African-Americans comprised its labor force, producing the iron tools and armaments that powered a growing nation until the furnace’s demise in 1903. From the Revolution until the mid-19th century, the iron furnace and associated agrarian enterprises relied primarily on the...