Domesticity (Other Keyword)

1-10 (10 Records)

Beyond Domesticity: Material and Spatial Expressions of Gender Systems in Deerfield, Massachusetts (2003)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Deborah L. Rotman.

This presentation was part of the symposium "Memory, Power, and the Archaeology of Rural New England" at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology in Providence, Rhode Island. The paper focuses on the cult of domesticity and how it has been the most widely studied of all gender systems. However, additional ideologies – such as equal rights feminism, domestic reform, and others – also shaped gender relations during the second half of the eighteenth through the early twentieth...


Class, Ethnicity, and Ceramic Consumption in a Boston Tenement (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Webster.

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Boston’s North End became home to thousands of European immigrants, mostly from Ireland and Italy. The majority of these immigrant families lived in crowded tenement apartments and earned their wages from low-paying jobs such as manual laborers or store clerks. The Ebenezer Clough House, which was originally built as a single-family colonial home in the early eighteenth century, was repurposed as a tenement in the nineteenth century, becoming...


Drawing From The Well: The Life Of A Founding Family, Boise, Idaho, 1864-1907 (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica L Goodwin.

In 2012, an abandoned well was discovered beneath the porch at the Cyrus Jacobs-Uberuaga House in Boise, Idaho. The house, now a part of the Basque Museum and Cultural Center, is already a cultural and historical landmark, both for its importance to Boise’s early history and its Basque population. The nearly 16,000 artifacts recovered in 2012 shed light on the house’s earliest occupation by the Jacobs family, from 1864-1907. The Jacobs were one of the founding families of Boise and helped shape...


In Small Things Collected: Domesticity in World War Two Era Flagstaff (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily Dale.

This is an abstract from the "Historical Archaeologies of the American Southwest, 1800 to Today" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. From the 1980s to 1990s, Northern Arizona University ethnomusicologist Joann Kealiinohomoku collected artifacts she found in the backyard of her Flagstaff home and kept them in a variety of food jars. While Dr. Kealiinohomoku had no discernible methodology in collecting the artifacts and left behind no notes or evidence...


Living in Work Spaces and Working in Living Spaces: Intersections of Labor and Domesticity in the Enslaved Community at Montpelier. (2015)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Eric Schweickart.

The lives of the members of the enslaved community at James Madison’s plantation in Virginia, Montpelier, were shaped by the types of work they were expected to do in order to keep the president’s mansion and farm running smoothly.  Archaeological excavations at several different early 19th century enslaved households at Montpelier reveal the way their inhabitant’s labors influenced the domestic activities which took place within and around these structures.  By comparing and contrasting the...


Sacred Dinners and Secular Teas: Constructing Domesticity in Mid-19th Century New York (1991)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Diana DiZerega Wall.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


"Several Paradise Ladies Are Visiting in Town": Gender Strategies In the Early Industrial West (1991)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Purser.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Soldier's Exemption: Post-War Domestic Consumption in Flagstaff, Arizona (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rachael E. O'Hara. Emily Dale.

This is a poster submission presented at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. With the impact of World War II and the development of Route 66, Flagstaff, Arizona grew exponentially from the 1940s to the 1960s. This growth is seen through a series of domestic artifacts collected at a home in Flagstaff’s Southside Historic District. Due to a lack of archaeological context, in this poster, we explore the items through the history of the Carrenos, a Hispanic family who...


To Possess the Cultural Capital to Carve Dolomite Marbles and Exchange Blue Beads: Constructing Community and Creating Spaces of Multicultural Encounters on the Nineteenth Century Wisconsin Frontier (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dana Olesch. Guido Pezzarossi.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Considering Frontiers Beyond the Romantic: Spaces of Encroachment, Innovation, and Far Reaching Entanglements" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The midwestern “frontier” of the United States formed and was transformed by the lead mining rush of the nineteenth century. Dependent on the volatile market for and production of lead and shaped by the diversely positioned tastes, practices and motivations of the...


‘The True Spirit of Service’: Toys as Tools of Ideology at the Dorchester Industrial School for Girls (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Johnson.

This paper examines the role of ceramics, as both teaching tools and toys, in identity formation at the Industrial School for Girls in Dorchester, Massachusetts. The School, which opened in Dorchester in 1859, had the goal of training girls from impoverished backgrounds to be domestic servants, and as such, the material culture at the School would have been important in reinforcing or contradicting the social roles that these girls were being taught to inhabit. Using adult and doll scale...