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Jordan's Journey (44PG302) (Site Name Keyword)

1-25 (66 Records)

An Analysis of Marked and Decorated White Clay Tobacco Pipes from the Lower Patuxent Drainage (2004)

DOCUMENT Katherine D. Cavallo.

This paper examines the types, quantities, and distributions of marked and decorated white clay tobacco pipes from four 17th century archaeological sites located along the lower Patuxent River in southern Maryland. Although marked pipes often account for a relatively small percentage of total pipe assemblages, important patterns in both their temporal and spatial distribution are clearly evident. For example, even though records indicate that Bristol pipemaker Llewellin Evans was working from...


Archaeological Excavations at Jordan's Point: Sites 44PG151, 44PG300, 44PG302, 44PG303, 44PG315, 44PG333 (1995)

DOCUMENT Tim Morgan. Nicholas M. Luccketti. Beverly Straube. S. Fiona Bessey. Annette Loomis. Charles Hodges.

This volume is a technical report on the excavations of six archaeological sites at Jordan's Point: 44PG151, 44PG300, 44PG302, 44PG303, 44PG315, and 44PG333. It is the fourth in a series of reports on archaeological investigations at Jordan's Point sponsored primarily by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (VDHR) Threatened Sites Program. The first three volumes were written by the Virginia Commonwealth University Archaeological Research Center (VCU-ARC) on excavations conducted by...


Archaeological Indicators of Native American Influences on English Life in the Colonial Chesapeake (2005)

DOCUMENT Edward E. Chaney.

All too often, archaeological studies of the Contact Period, as it occurred in the Chesapeake Bay region, have focused on the European impact on Native American life. The opposite side of this interaction—the effects Indians had on colonial life—has been downplayed. Indian-made artifacts found on colonial sites are often seen as little more than indicators of “trade.” However, a closer examination of the evidence suggests that the Native impact on English settlers was more profound. Using data...


An Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture

PROJECT Julia King.

Using detailed comparisons of the archaeological assemblages from 18 early sites in the Chesapeake, this project explores the material conditions of culture contact, plantation development and organization, the rise of slavery, and consumer behavior. Comparable artifact databases have been created for the 18 sites, and analysis of artifact distributions has provided great insight into differences and similarities.


Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture, Coding Conventions for Comprehensive Artifact Catalog (2004)

DATASET Gregory Brown.

Coding Conventions for the use of the comprehensive artifact catalog associated with the Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture project. Also linked to the Manual for the comprehensive artifact catalog.


Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture, Comprehensive Artifact Catalog (2004)

DATASET Gregory Brown.

Comprehensive artifact catalog for the Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture project, an NEH-funded comparative analysis of 18 early seventeenth-century archaeological sites in the Chesapeake region. The artifact catalog, composed of about 186,000 records, was created from the individual artifact catalogs for the 18 sites, combined and standardized into a single MS Access database. The associated manual and coding conventions documents (below) explain in detail how to use the...


Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture, Manual for Comprehensive Artifact Catalog (2004)

DOCUMENT Gregory Brown.

Manual for the use of the comprehensive artifact catalog associated with the Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture project. Also linked to the Coding Conventions for the comprehensive artifact catalog.


Artifact Distribution Maps from Jordan's Journey (2004)

DOCUMENT Catherine Alston.

Artifact distribution maps produced for the Comparative Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture project


Artifact Images from Jordan's Journey (2004)

DOCUMENT Catherine Alston.

Artifact images produced for the Comparative Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture project


Beef, Venison, and Imported Haddock in Colonial Virginia: A Report on the Analysis of Faunal Remains from Jordan's Journey (1996)

DOCUMENT Joanne Bowen.

In 1984, Henry Miller completed his synthesis of dietary patterns in the Chesapeake, beginning with the first years of settlement as the colonists began to establish plantations and following with how dietary patterns changed as the plantation economy evolved. In this very important piece of work, Miller observed that wildlife helped to sustain the colonists through the early years. On the average, wildlife (excepting oysters and crabs) provided up to 30% of all meat consumed. Only later,...


A Comparative Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture: Project Update (2004)

DOCUMENT Catherine Alston.

In 2003, a consortium of researchers at various institutions undertook the project, ‘A Comparative Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture,’ funded by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Virginia Department of Historic Resources. This project is designed to document and interpret the interactions between the multiple groups that made up the Chesapeake society by comparing material culture recovered from various colonial sites in Maryland and Virginia. The...


Digital Technology in Comparative Studies (2005)

DOCUMENT Catherine Alston.

Conducting comparative archaeological studies is a trend that has developed over the past few decades, and with each project the concept and methodologies become more and more robust. In doing such comparative projects, digital technologies are essential for a successful study. Due to a comprehensive database set and the ability to spatially map the material culture recovered at the sites, the project “A Comparative Archaeological Study of Colonial Chesapeake Culture” is proving to be a powerful...


An Enigmatic Monarch: The Biography of a Headless, Mold-made, White Pipe Clay Pipe King Recovered in 17th Century Maryland (2007)

DOCUMENT Anne Dowling Grulich.

This article follows a diminutive, headless, seventeenth century pipe clay figurine of a king from its conception in post-medieval Europe through its use, interment, and rebirth three centuries later in southern Maryland, USA. It is not so much the monarch it represents or the historical figure who owned it, but the meanings embodied by the artifact and our role in that process that this biography develops. This battered 300 year old figurine beckons us with its props and its demeanor. ...


The Importance of Plow Zone Archaeology (2004)

DOCUMENT Julia King.

In the last 25 years, a number of studies have emerged demonstrating that, while vertical stratigraphy is indeed destroyed by plowing, the horizontal or spatial distribution of materials is affected only minimally. Artifacts recovered from plow zone contexts are usually found close to where they were both used and discarded, with important implications for examining the spatial layout of archaeological sites. Distributions of plow zone artifacts and soil chemicals have been used to identify room...


JJ-90-JordansJourney.tif

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

no description provided


JJ-93-JordansJourneyDrawing.TIF

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

no description provided


Jordan's Journey (44PG302)

PROJECT Uploaded by: Gregory Brown

The sites associated with the early 17th-century settlement known as Jordan’s Journey were located at Jordan’s Point near the confluence of the James and Appomatox rivers in Prince George’s County, Virginia. The property was initially occupied by Weyanoke Indians, one of the groups that formed the Powhatan chiefdom. About 1620, Samuel Jordan, his wife, Cecily, her two daughters, and their adult male servants took up residence at Jordan’s Point; this occupation is probably archaeological site...


Jordan's Journey: A Preliminary Report on Archaeology at Site 44Pg302, Prince George County, Virginia, 1990-1991 (1992)

DOCUMENT L. Daniel Mouer. Douglas C. McLearen. R. Taft Kiser. Christopher P. Egghart. Beverly Binns. Dane Magoon.

Archaeological site 44Pg302 comprises the remains of the household complex founded by Samuel Jordan, his wife Cicely, her daughters, and their adult male servants. For present purposes, we have estimated the dates of occupation of the site as encompassing the fifteen-year period between ca. 1620 and ca. 1635. In the 1620's, the new settlement of Jordan's Journey was one of the largest English enclaves in what was then referred to as "the upper parts" of James River, and was included within...


Jordan's Journey: A Preliminary Report on the 1992 Excavations at Archaeological Sites 44PG302, 44PG303, and 44PG315 (1993)

DOCUMENT Douglas C. McLearen. L. Daniel Mouer. Donna M. Boyd. Douglas W. Owsley. Bertita Compton.

This report presents technical information and preliminary interpretations of the results of archaeological studies conducted during the period March 1992-October 1993 at three sites on Jordan’s Point, Prince George County, Virginia. The studies were conducted as part of an on-going effort to rescue vital archaeological materials and data threatened by development on the Point. Four sites received considerable attention this year, but one of those — 44PG307 — will be the subject of a separate...


Jordan’s Journey (44PG302): Artifact Distributions, Terra Cotta Pipes (2004)

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

Artifact distribution map, terra cotta pipes


Jordan’s Journey (44PG302): Artifact Distributions, Tin-Glazed Earthenware (2004)

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

Artifact distribution map, tin-glazed earthenware


Jordan’s Journey (44PG302): Artifact Distributions, White Clay Tobacco Pipes (2004)

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

Artifact distribution map, white clay tobacco pipes


Jordan’s Journey (44PG302): Axe Head (2004)

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

Representative artifacts: Axe head


Jordan’s Journey (44PG302): Bale Seal (2004)

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

Representative artifacts: Bale seal


Jordan’s Journey (44PG302): Bartmann Jug (2004)

IMAGE Catherine Alston.

Representative artifacts: Bartmann jug

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America